Clinical Neuroscience

[Role of the intraoperative electrical brain stimulation in conserving the speech and language function in neurosurgical operations of awake patients]

ERÕSS Loránd1,2, FEKETE Gábor3, ENTZ László1,4, FABÓ Dániel1,4, BORBÉLY Csaba1, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf5, ANDREJKOVICS Mónika6, CZIRJÁK Sándor1, FEDORCSÁK Imre1,3, NOVÁK László, BOGNÁR László1,3

SEPTEMBER 30, 2012

Clinical Neuroscience - 2012;65(09-10)

[Aim of the study - To summarize the results gained with awake craniotomies, which were performed in either low grade glioma patients or epilepsy surgical patients whose tumor or epileptogenic zone, was in the vicinity of eloquent, mostly language, cortices. Patient selection and methods - In our retrospective study we selected 16 patients who were operated awake between 1999-2011 at the Neurosurgical Department of MÁV Kórház Budapest, or at the National Institute of Neurosciences in Budapest, or at the Neurosurgical Department of the University of Debrecen in Debrecen. In the presurgical evaluation if it was possible we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging, tractography and detailed neuropsychological testing. At the National Institute of Neurosciences all patients were operated with the aid of MR guided neuronavigation. Results - Anesthesia was carried out without complications in all of the 16 cases. Monitoring of sleep deepness has significantly contributed to the safety of anesthesia during the superficial anesthezied states of the operation. The intraoperative neuropsychological tasks used for testing language were sensitive enough to judge the little disturbances in speech during stimulation. Stimulation evoked seizures could be adequately managed during surgery and did not influence the outcome of the procedures. The use of neuronavigation helped significantly by planning the optimal place for the craniotomy and by intraoperative orientation. Conclusions - Awake craniotomies require well practiced surgical teams, which requires the cooperation of neuro-anesthesiologits, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologist and electrophysiologists. It has two goals, first to reduce the time of surgery to minimize surgical complications, secondly the detailed intraoperative mapping of cognitive and motor functions to avoid any neurological deficit. The intraoperative anatomical data provided by the neuronavigation and the functional data provided by awake intraoperative stimulation of the patient together serve the safety of the patient which is essential in the neurologically minimal invasive neurosurgical approach of the 21st century.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Országos Idegtudományi Intézet, Budapest
  2. Pázmány Péter Katolikus Egyetem, Információs Technológiai Kar, Budapest
  3. Debreceni Egyetem, Orvos- és Egészségügyi Centrum, Idegsebészeti Klinika, Debrecen
  4. MTA, Természettudományi Kutatóközpont, Kognitív Idegtudományi és Pszichológiai Intézet, Budapest
  5. Semmelweis Egyetem, MR Kutatóközpont, Budapest
  6. Debreceni Egyetem, Orvos- és Egészségügyi Centrum, Pszichiátriai Tanszék, Debrecen

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[Health status and costs of ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary]

PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, RÓZSA Csilla, SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna, KOMOLY Sámuel, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Data on disease burden of multiple sclerosis from Eastern-Central Europe are very limited. Our aim was to explore the quality of life, resource utilisation and costs of ambulating patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two outpatient neurology centres in 2009. Clinical history, health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed, the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the EQ-5D questionnaires were applied. Cost calculation was conducted from the societal perspective. Results - Sixty-eight patients (female 70.6%) aged 38.0 (SD 9.1) with disease duration of 7.8 (SD 6.7) years were involved. Fifty-five (80.9%) had relapsing-remitting form and 52 (76.5%) were taking immunomodulatory drug. The average scores were: Expanded Disability Status Scale 1.9 (SD 1.7), EQ-5D 0.67 (SD 0.28). Mean total cost amounted to 10 902 Euros/patient/year (direct medical 67%, direct nonmedical 13%, indirect costs 20%). Drugs, disability pension and informal care were the highest cost items. Costs of mild (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-3.5) and moderate (Expanded Disability Status Scale 4.0-6.5) disease were 9 218 and 17 634 Euros/patient/year respectively (p<0.01), that is lower than results from Western European countries. Conclusion - Our study provides current inputs for policy making and contributes to understanding variation of costof- illness of multiple sclerosis in Europe.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Editorial message]

SZOK Délia

[Editorial message 2012;65(09-10)]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Developmental neurology, development of the self-awareness, the communication and the movement Marianne Berényi, Ferenc Katona]

VÉCSEI László

[Developmental neurology, development of the self-awareness, the communication and the movement Marianne Berényi, Ferenc Katona 2012;65(09-10)]

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[Dear Colleagues!]

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[Burning sensation in oral cavity - burning mouth syndrome in everyday medical practice]

GERLINGER Imre

[Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) refers to chronic orofacial pain, unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women. BMS is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, preferably on the tongue or in other areas of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by other sensory disorders such as dry mouth or taste alterations. Probably of multifactorial origin, and often idiopathic, with a still unknown etiopathogenesis in which local, systemic and psychological factors are implicated. Currently there is no consensus on the diagnosis and classification of BMS. This study reviews the literature on this syndrome, with special reference to the etiological factors that may be involved and the clinical aspects they present. The diagnostic criteria that should be followed and the therapeutic management are discussed with reference to the most recent studies.]

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UÇAN TOKUÇ Ezgi Firdevs , FATMA Genç, ABIDIN Erdal, YASEMIN Biçer Gömceli

Many systemic problems arise due to the side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used in epilepsy patients. Among these adverse effects are low bone mineral density and increased fracture risk due to long-term AED use. Although various studies have supported this association with increased risk in recent years, the length of this process has not been precisely defined and there is no clear consensus on bone density scanning, intervals of screening, and the subject of calcium and vitamin D supplementation. In this study, in accordance with the most current recommendations, our applications and data, including the detection of possible bone mineralization disorders, treatment methods, and recommendations to prevent bone mineralization disorders, were evaluated in epilepsy patients who were followed up at our outpatient clinic. It was aimed to draw attention to the significance of management of bone metabolism carried out with appropriate protocols. Epilepsy patients were followed up at the Antalya Training and Research Hospital Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Outpatient Clinic who were at high risk for osteoporosis (use of valproic acid [VPA] and enzyme-inducing drugs, using any AED for over 5 years, and postmenopausal women) and were evaluated using a screening protocol. According to this protocol, a total of 190 patients suspected of osteoporosis risk were retrospectively evaluated. Four patients were excluded from the study due to secondary osteoporosis. Of the 186 patients who were included in the study, 97 (52.2%) were women and 89 (47.8%) were men. Prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) was 42%, in which osteoporosis was detected in 11.8% and osteopenia in 30.6% of the patients. Osteoporosis rate was higher at the young age group (18-45) and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.018). There was no significant difference between male and female sexes according to osteoporosis and osteopenia rates. Patients receiving polytherapy had higher osteoporosis rate and lower BMD compared to patients receiving monotherapy. Comparison of separate drug groups according to osteoporosis rate revealed that osteoporosis rate was highest in patient groups using VPA+ carbamazepine (CBZ) (29.4%) and VPA polytherapy (19.4%). Total of osteopenia and osteoporosis, or low BMD, was highest in VPA polytherapy (VPA+ non-enzyme-inducing AED [NEID]) and CBZ polytherapy (CBZ+NEID) groups, with rates of 58.3% and 55.1%, respectively. In addition, there was no significant difference between drug groups according to bone metabolism markers, vitamin D levels, and osteopenia-osteoporosis rates. Assuming bone health will be affected at an early age in epilepsy patients, providing lifestyle and diet recommendations, avoiding polytherapy including VPA and CBZ when possible, and evaluating bone metabolism at regular intervals are actions that should be applied in routine practice.

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[Functional imaging studies opened a new way to understand the neural activity underlying pain perception and the pathomechanism of chronic pain syndromes. In the last twenty years several results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been published about examining the different aspects of complex pain experience. The aim of these studies is to understand the functioning of the pain control system, the so-called pain matrix, activated by acute nociceptive stimulus. Another important field of pain research is the investigation of neuronal processes underlying chronic pain, since the pathomechanism of this is still unclear. Our review aims to provide insight into the methods of pain research using fMRI and the achievements of the last few years.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Effects of valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam on Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio

YASAR Altun, ERDOGAN Yasar

Aim - To evaluate P-wave dispersion before and after antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment as well as to investigate the risk of ventricular repolarization using the Tpeak-Tend (Tp-e) interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with epileptic disorder. Methods - A total of 63 patients receiving AED therapy and 35 healthy adults were included. ECG recordings were obtained before and 3 months after anti-epileptic treatment among patients with epilepsy. For both groups, Tp-e and Tp-e/QT ratio were measured using a 12-lead ECG device. Results - Tp-e interval, Tpe/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were found to be higher in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05, for all), while QTmax ratio was significantly lower in the patient group. After 3 months of AED therapy, significant increases in QT max, QTc max, QTcd, Tp-e, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc were found among the patients (p<0.05). When the arrhythmic effects of the drugs before and after treatment were compared, especially in the valproic acid group, there were significant increases in Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc values after three months of treatment (p<0.05). Carbamazepine and levetiracetam groups were not statistically significant in terms of pre- and post-treatment values. Conclusions - It was concluded that an arrhythmogenic environment may be associated with the disease, and patients who received AED monotherapy may need to be followed up more closely for arrhythmia.

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