Clinical Neuroscience

[Prolonged EEG-monitoring]

HALÁSZ Péter

SEPTEMBER 23, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(09-10)

[Prolonged EEG monitoring and video-EEG monitoring are basic methods on the level of epilepsy centers. These methods are able to make differences between epilepsy and non epileptic paroxysmal manifestations like psychogenic non epileptic seizures, parasomniac phenomena, narcolepsy. The application of the method, at least the video-EEG variant, needs team work, high level organisation, highly educated staff and high tech electrographic devices. Running the method even with these requirements is beneficial from the cost-benefit aspect as well.]

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