Clinical Neuroscience

[Posttraumatic intracerebral pneumocele]

STEPIEN Lucjan1

MARCH 28, 1952

Clinical Neuroscience - 1952;5(01)

[The intracerebral pneumothorax (IP) was first described by Chiari in 1884 (1), and then detected by Luckett (2) in 1913 with rtg. as air trapped in the brain ventricle after a skull fracture. Since that time, numerous publications have discussed the aetiology, symptomatology and treatment of IP; in the Polish literature Chorobski and Tyczka (3), Zawadowski (4), Herman and Spiro (5). There are about 120 publications on the same subject in the literature.]

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  1. Lodzi Egyetem Ideggyógyászati Klinikája Idegsebészeti Osztály

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Clinical significance of abdominal-reflex dissociation]

LEHOCZKY Tibor, FODOR Tamás

[1. The behaviour of the abdominal skin reflex and abdominal muscle reflex was investigated in 500 subjects. Seven pathologies were found to have complete or true abdominal reflex dissociation: myelopathy 86.6%, multiple sclerosis 77%, syringomyelia 75%, tumor spinalis 53.3%, hemiplegia 28.8%, tabes 11.5%, neurolues 9.2%. Partial dissociation was observed in parkinsonism (5%) and neurasthenia (2%), the significance of which is debatable. The number of cases of syringomyelia is too small to draw conclusions. 2. Dissociation is most frequent in the 3 pathologies whose clinical differentiation is particularly difficult (multiple sclerosis, myelopathy, spinal cord tumour). Within these, the percentages for multiple sclerosis and myelopathy are almost identical. 3. Complete or true abdominal reflex dissociation is most often seen in multifocal spinal diseases. It has no pathognomonic value, but it can be evaluated with a 77 and 86.6% probability in clinical symptomatology in multiple sclerosis and myelopathy, respectively. 4. The examination of the abdominal muscle reflex and thus the search for abdominal reflex dissociation is a valuable and important data in organic neurology.]

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[Brain chamber sutures]

ZOLTÁN László

[The author performed stitching of a brain chamber opened during meningocerebral scar excision in six cases. Five patients suffered from post-traumatic epilepsy. Of these, 4 were virtually asymptomatic. The condition of the fifth, whose suture proved inadequate, did not improve. One patient had an abscess at the site of the ventricular suture that did not travel with the ventricle after surgery. Besides the novelty of the surgical technique, for which no equivalent or similar surgical procedure has been found in the literature, the author considers the significance of the method to be that the ventricular suture may play a role in normalising the cerebrospinal fluid balance, in addition to preventing possible postoperative ventricular haemorrhage.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

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[Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome with amitriptyline]

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[Introduction - Complex regional pain syndrome is a di­stressing neuropathic pain condition without known etiology and evidence based treatment. Case presentation - Here a posttraumatic severe case of complex regional pain syndrome is presented, successfully treated by amitriptyline monotherapy. Amitriptyline is one of the most effective evidence based treatments of peri­pheral diabetic neuropathic pain and other neuropathic pain syndromes. Discussion - Amitriptyline seems to be effective to decrease pain, autonomic and motor symptoms in chronic regional pain syndrome. Conclusion - Controlled trials may be warranted to test the effectiveness of amitriptyline in complex regional pain syndrome.]

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[Blood pressure management for stroke prevention and in the acute stroke. The new guideline of European Society of Hypertension (ESH, 2018), European Society of Cardiology and Hungarian Society of Hypertension (HSH, 2018)]

JENEI Zoltán

[Hypertension is the leading modifiable risk factor for stroke. Its prevalence amongst stroke patient is about 60-70% and the benefit of blood pressure (BP) lowering therapy on stroke risk reduction is well established. However the optimal BP targets for preventing stroke and reducing stroke consequences have been controversial. The new European (ESC/ESH) and Hungarian (HSH) hypertension guideline published in 2018 highlighted the primary and secondary prevention of stroke and the BP management in the acute stroke care as well. According results from ACCORD, SPRINT, HOPE-3, and other metaanalysis the systolic blood pressure (SBP) lowering < 120 mmHg has not favourable effect, thus in hypertensive patients < 65 years the SBP should be lowered to a BP range of 120-129 mmHg. In older patients ≥ 65 years the SBP should be targeted to a BP range of 130-139 mmHg (IA). In patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage careful acute BP lowering with iv. therapy, to <180 mmHg should be considered only in case of SBP ≥ 220 mmHg (IIaB). In patients with acute ischaemic stroke who are eligible for iv. thrombolysis, BP should be carefully lowered and maintained to < 180/105 mmHg for at least the first 24 h after thrombolysis (IIaB). If the patient is not eli gible for lysis and BP ≤ 220/110 mmHg, routine BP lowering drug therapy is not recommended inside 48-72 h (IA). In patients with markedly elevated BP > 220/110 mmHg who do not receive fibrinolysis, drug therapy may be considered, based on clinical judgement, to reduce BP by 15% during the first 24 h after the stroke onset (IIbC). After 72 h of acute stroke in case of hypertensive patients < 65 years the SBP should be lowered to a BP range of 120-129 mmHg (IIaB). In older patients ≥ 65 years the SBP should be targeted to a BP range of 130-139 mmHg (IA). If BP < 140/90 mmHg after stroke, the BP lowering should be considered (IIbA). It is recommended to initiate an antihypertensive treatment with combination, preferably single pill combination of renin-angiotensin system blockers plus a calcium channel blocker and/or a thiazide like diuretics (IA). Lowering SBP < 120 mmHg is not recommended due to advers events regardless of age and type of stroke either in primary or secondary stroke prevention.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Radiosurgery of intracerebral cavernomas - Current Hungarian practice]

FEDORCSÁK Imre, NAGY Gábor, DOBAI József Gábor, MEZEY Géza, BOGNÁR László

[Background and purpose - Radiosurgery is an increasingly popular treatment option especially for deep eloquent intracerebral cavernomas that are often too risky for surgical removal, but their re-bleed carries significant risk for persisting neurological deficit. Gamma-radiation based radiosurgery has been being available since 2007 in Hungary in Debrecen. Our aim is to summarize our experience accumulated during the first five years of treatment and to compare it to the international experience. Patient selection and methods - We retrospectively analyzed 51 cavernomas in 45 patients treated between 2008 and 2012 in terms of localization, natural history, and the effect of radiosurgery on re-bleed risk and epilepsy, and its side effects. Results - We treated 26.5% deep eloquent (brainstem, thalamic/basal ganglia) and 72.5% superficial hemispheric cavernomas. The median presentation age was 25 years (13-60) for deep, and 45 years (6-67) for superficial cavernomas. They were treated median of 1 year after presentation. 64.5% of deep cavernomas bled before treatment, the annual risk of first hemorrhage was 2%/lesion, re-bleed risk 21.7%, with 44% persisting morbidity. 13.5% of superficial cavernomas bled prior to treatment, the risk of first bleed was 0.3%, there was no re-bleed, and 35% caused epilepsy. We used GammaART-6000TM rotating gamma system for treatment, marginal dose was 14 Gy (10-16), and treatment volume 1.38-1.53 cm3. Re-bleed risk of deep eloquent lesions fell to 4% during the first two years after treatment and to 0% thereafter, and no hemorrhage occurred from superficial lesions after treatment. Persisting morbidity in deep lesions came from adverse radiation effect in 7% and from re-bleed in 7%, and there was no persisting side effect in superficial cavernomas. 87.5% of cases of epilepsy resistant to medical therapy improved. Radiological regression was found in 37.5% and progression in 2% after treatment. Conclusions - Radiosurgery of cavernomas is safe and effective. Early preventive treatment for deep cavernomas carrying high surgical risk is justified. Moreover, for superficial lesions that are surgically easily accessible radiosurgery also appears to be an attractive alternative.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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[High resolution ultrasonography is an emerging technique for the investigation of peripheral nerves and is increasingly used worldwide in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders, however, until now it is not widespread in Hungary. According to the literature this method is especially useful in entrapment neuropathies, traumatic peripheral nerve injuries, tumors of the peripheral nerves and sonographically guided interventions. Ultrasonography allows precise morphological analysis and quantitative measurements of the nerves providing useful complementary information to electrodiagnostic data. In entrapment neuropathies ultrasound shows nerve swelling mainly proximal to the sites of compression and a focal change of echotexture. On longitudinal scan, an abrupt caliber change and spindle-like swelling of the compressed nerve segment can be seen. Evaluation of the anatomical background and visualisation of the postoperative and posttraumatic changes provide useful information for planning of the therapy. Ultrasound may be of significant help in localizing the pathological nerve segment when it is at an electrophysiologically inaccessible site or when substantial secondary axonal loss precludes precise electrophysiological localization and it might even show pathological changes when nerve conduction studies are normal. Contrary to electrophysiological investigation ultrasonography might discover neurotmesis in the akute phase of traumatic nerve injuries indicating the necessity of surgical intervention. We provide a summary of the main indications and further application areas of this method.]