Clinical Neuroscience

[Immunological test for idiopathic inflammatory myopathies]

HORVÁTH Rita1, ALZIRA A S Carvalmo2

MARCH 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(03-04)

[Sceletal muscle biopsy specimens from patients with various inflammatory myopathies – dermatomyositis, polymyositis and inclusion body myositis – have been investigated by immunocytochemical methods with the help of monoclonal antibodies. Conclusions about the pathomechanism of these disorders were saught. In dermatomyositis the humoral immunity and the damage of the small vessels of muscle fibres may play an important role. The appearance of class I MHC antigens on diseased muscle may make the affected tissue a target for cytotoxic T8 cells, and may thus have a role in muscle fibre damage in polymyositis and inclusion body myositis.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Jahn Ferenc Kórház Organikus Ideggyógyászati Osztály, Budapest
  2. Department of Neuropathology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxfordshire Health Authority

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