Clinical Neuroscience

[Frontotemporal dementia or frontotemporal lobar degeneration - Overview of a group of proteinopathies]

CATHERINE Haberland

MARCH 24, 2010

Clinical Neuroscience - 2010;63(03-04)

[Frontotemporal dementia is the second most common early onset dementia after Alzheimer disease. Frontotemporal dementias are a complex group of dementias. The clinical diagnosis can be perplexing because of concurring psychiatric and neurologic syndromes. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration, the underlying pathology, represents an emerging group of proteinopathies. Genetic factors play an important part in the etiologies of dementias. This article overviews current defining characteristics of frontotemporal dementias known also as frontotemporal lobar degenerations]

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[In the last 30 years it has been a great development in the understanding and therapy of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Adequate pharmaco- and cognitive-behavior therapies reduce the symptoms in 40-60% of patients, so a remarkable portion of patients still remains refractory to conventional treatment. Neurosurgery - with it’s reversible and irreversible techniques - brought a breakthrough in the therapy of treatment refractory patients. In the present case, we represent a 3 months follow-up of an obsessive-compulsive patient treated by deep brain stimulation. In our case, the stimulation target was the anterior limb of internal capsule. The clinical symptoms were measured by Y-BOCS. In addition various neuropsychological tests were used to monitor patient’s executive functions before and 3 months after the deep brain stimulation. We found that obsessive-compulsive symptoms improved after three months of the stimulation. The neuropsychological tests showed improvement in some executive functions (e.g. fluency, set-shifting, decision making). On the other hand our results revealed severe neurocognitive - mainly attention skill - deficits in a treatment refractory obsessive-compulsive patient.]

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