Clinical Neuroscience

[Excerpts of achievements of pharmaceutical cerebro-vascular protection, with especial regard to the statins]

BAJNOK László

MAY 20, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(05-06)

[Despite that hypercholesterinemia is not a risk factor of stroke, treatment with statins is able to reduce these events in a clinically relevant degree. Intervention trials suggest that while for primary prevention, statins are effective in conventional dose, after stroke or TIA this is true only if LDL-cholesterol is reduced below 1,8 mmol/L. To reach this goal, usually intensive antilipid treatment is necessary. There are studies showing beneficial impacts of other lipid drugs, beyond statins, i.e. fibrates and fish oil (among the settings of primary, and secondary preventions, respectively). Against cerebro-vascular events, pleitropic effects of some antihypertensive and antidiabetic medications can also be established.]

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[Neuropsychiatry - in Hungary and other countries]

GYURIS Jenő

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[Practical neurology and neuroanatomy Komoly Sámuel, Palkovits Miklós]

DIÓSZEGHY Péter

Clinical Neuroscience

[Antinociception by endogenous ligands at peripheral level]

HORVÁTH Gyöngyi, MÉCS László

[It is well known that a multitude of ligands and receptors are involved in the nociceptive system, and some of them increase, while others inhibit the pain sensation both peripherally and centrally. These substances, including neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, hormones, cytokines etc., may modify the activity of nerves involved in the pain pathways. It is also well known that the organism can express very effective antinociception in different circumstances, and during such situations the levels of various endogenous ligands change. Accordingly, a very exciting field of pain research relates to the roles of endogenous ligands. The peripheral action may possibly be extremely important, because low doses of the endogenous ligands may reduce pain without disphoric side-effects, and without the abused potential typical of centrally acting ligands. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the endogenous ligands that can induce antinociception, discusses their effects on different receptors and focuses on their action at peripheral level. We found 17 different endogenous ligands which produced antinociception after their topical administration. The results suggest an important direction for the development of pain strategies that focus on the local administrations of different endogenous ligands.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Our clinical experience with zonisamide in resistant generalized epilepsy syndromes]

KELEMEN Anna, RÁSONYI György, NEUWIRTH Magdolna, BARCS Gábor, SZŰCS Anna, JAKUS Rita, FABÓ Dániel, JUHOS Vera, PÁLFY Beatrix, HALÁSZ Péter

[Purpose - Zonisamide is licensed in the European Union for adjunctive therapy for partial epilepsy, but its efficacy in generalized epilepsy was less explored. Methods - This prospective observational study included 47 patients (mean age 29 years, range 3-50) with different resistant generalized epilepsy syndromes: idiopathic generalized syndromes (IGE) 15 patients, (juvenile myoclonic epilepsy four, absence epilepsy four, myoclonic absence two, unclassified IGE five), progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1 (PME1) four, severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) three, borderline SMEI three, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome/secondary generalized epileptic encephalopties 23 patients. All patients were followed up for at least six months. The mean dose given was 367 mg/day (range 100-600 mg/day), the patients received at least one and no more than two concomitant AE. Response was defined as more than 50% seizure reduction or seizure freedom. Results - The best effect was achieved in PME one, all the patients were responders. Myoclonic seizures were reduced 80%, none of the patients had generalized tonic clonic (GTC) seizures. In two of the four patients all other antiepileptics were tapered of (including piracetam), so they were GTC seizure and almost myoclonia free on zonisamide only. Responder rates were in GEFS ± SME 62.5%, in resistant IGE 62.5%, and in epileptic encephalopathies 33.3% patients. Tolerance after initial efficacy developed in six patients. Adverse effects were mild: weight loss, somnolence and confusion were repeatedly reported. Three patients reported cognitive improvement. Conclusion - Clinical benefit of a broad spectrum antiepileptic zonisamide extends across seizure types, ages and epilepsy syndromes. The efficacy in PME proved to be excellent.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[In memoriam Professor Rozália Kálmánchey (1946-2011)]

SZIRMAI Imre

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Hyperhomocysteinemia in female migraineurs of childbearing ages

ALEMDAR Murat, SELEKLER Macit Hamit

Background and purpose - Migraine is a risk factor for ischemic stroke in women of childbearing ages. Previous researches revealed a higher prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia in migraineurs. Possible differences on the frequencies of hyperhomocysteinemia between migraine with aura and migraine without aura could contribute the established variances in stroke risk between these migraine types. Therefore, we aimed to search if the frequency of hyperhomocysteinemia was different between these subtypes of migraine or not. Methods - We analyzed the findings of serum homocysteine levels in female migraineurs of 16-49 years old who admitted to our outpatient clinic. Results - Homocysteine level was elevated in 13.3% of study population. There were not any significant differences on median serum homocysteine levels between migraine with aura (8.0 mikromol/L) and without aura (8.5 mikromol/L). (p=0.426) The frequencies of hyperhomocysteinemia were also similar (9.1% versus 16.7%, respectively; p=0.373). Correlation analyses did not reveal any linear correlation between ages and homocysteine levels either in group of migraine with aura or in group of migraine without aura (p=0.417 and p=0.647, respectively). Similarly, any linear correlation between disease ages and homocysteine levels either in group of migraine with aura or in group of migraine without aura was not detected (p=0.359 and p=0.849, respectively). Conclusion - The median serum homocysteine levels and the frequencies of hyperhomocysteinemia are similar between migraine with aura and without aura in women of childbearing ages. Therefore, the variances on stroke risk ratios between these types of migraine are probably not originated from the differences of serum homocysteine status.

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[THE IMPORTANCE OF THE RECOGNITION AND TREATMENT OF LIPID METABOLISM DISORDERS IN THE SECONDARY PREVENTION OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES]

FOLYOVICH András, HORVÁTH Eszter

[The high world prevalence of cerebrovascular diseases, and the particularly bad morbidity rates of Hungary are well known. The physiological properties of the brain make stroke prevention outstandingly important. Effective prevention will be reflected in the reduction of the late complications that are otherwise common and expensive to treat. Because of the common simultaneous development of stroke, cardiovascular and peripheral vascular diseases, overall vascular disease prevention is preferred, even if the various vascular diseases manifest in different degrees in a patient. Hungarian data also indicate the high risk of recurrence of cerebrovascular diseases, therefore, the importance of secondary prevention is obvious. Large international studies have proven the strokepreventing effect, and, by a pleiotropic drug action, additional benefits, of the efficient treatment of blood lipid disorders. Consensus conferences in recent years defined clear and even stricter lipid-lowering target values, mostly to be reached by “double inhibition”, bile acid binding resins, fibrates and nicotinic acid derivatives, beside the most common statin treatment. Neurological and stroke departments and clinics play a pivotal role in vascular prevention.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Thrombolysis in case of ischemic stroke caused by aortic dissection]

LANTOS Judit, NAGY Albert, HEGEDŰS Zoltán, BIHARI Katalin

[Seldom, an acute aortic dissection can be the etiology of an acute ischemic stroke. The aortic dissection typically presents with severe chest pain, but in pain-free dissection, which ranges between 5-15% of the case, the neurological symptoms can obscure the sypmtos of the dissection. By the statistical data, there are 15-20 similar cases in Hungary in a year. In this study we present the case history of an acute ischemic stroke caused by aortic dissection, which is the first hungarian publication in this topic. A 59-year-old man was addmitted with right-gaze-deviation, acute left-sided weakness, left central facial palsy and dysarthric speech. An acute right side ischemic stroke was diagnosed by physical examination without syptoms of acute aortic dissection. Because, according to the protocol it was not contraindicated, a systemic intravenous thrombolysis was performed. The neurological sypmtoms disappeared and there were no complication or hypodensity on the brain computed tomography (CT). 36 hours after the thrombolysis, the patient become restlessness and hypoxic with back pain, without neurological abnormality. A chest CT was performed because of the suspition of the aortic dissection, and a Stanford-A type dissection was verified. After the acute aortic arch reconstruction the patient died, but there was no bleeding complication at the dissection site caused by the thrombolysis. This case report draws attention to the fact that aortic dissection can cause acute ischemic stroke. Although it is difficult to prove it retrospectively, we think the aortic dissection, without causing any symptoms or complain, had already been present before the stroke. In our opinion both the history of our patient and literature reviews confirms that in acute stroke the thrombolysis had no complication effect on the aortic dissection but ceased the neurological symptoms. If the dissection had been diagnosed before the thrombolysis, the aortic arch reconstruction would have been the first step of the treatment, without thrombolysis. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Investigation of insertion/deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene on stroke patients]

PONGRÁCZ Endre, TORDAI Attila, CSORNAI Márta, NAGY Zoltán

[Introduction - This is the first Hungarian paper on the insertion/deletion polymorphism of ACE gene in stroke patients. According to literature data, the role of this polymorphism is controversial in the pathogenesis of stroke. The aim was to study the prevalence of the polymorphism in healthy persons and in stroke patients. Patients and methods - Blood samples from 173 unrelated healthy donors and 253 stroke patients were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Preivous stroke was documented by CT or MRI and CDS. A routine questionnaire was used to study previous vascular events and the risk profile of patients. Results - I/I allele was found in 20%, I/D 52% and D/D 28% in the healthy group. Prevalence of the pathologic D/D allele did not differ between healthy and patients group (28% and 27%, OR: 0.88, and in subgroup age under 50 years OR: 1.00). No correlation was found between D/D and conventional risk profile but a positiv correlation was found in young patients having D/D and hyperlipidemia (p<0.05) and hyperfibrinogenemia (p<0.05). D/D prevalence was found higher in patients with family anamnesis of myocardial infarction (p<0.05). Very low prevalence of D/D allele was found in cardiogen embolic group (p>0.05). Conclusions - The ACE polymorphism does not seem to be an independent risk factor for stroke. However, in young stroke patients with D/D allele, hyperlipidemia and/or hyperfibrinogenemia present very high risk for stroke.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Comparison of hospitalized acute stroke patients’ characteristics using two large central-eastern european databases

ORBÁN-KIS Károly, SZŐCS Ildikó, FEKETE Klára, MIHÁLKA László, CSIBA László, BERECZKI Dániel, SZATMÁRI Szabolcs

Objectives – Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the European region. In spite of a decreasing trend, stroke related mortality remains higher in Hungary and Romania when compared to the EU average. This might be due to higher incidence, increased severity or even less effective care. Methods – In this study we used two large, hospital based databases from Targu Mures (Romania) and Debrecen (Hungary) to compare not only the demographic characteristics of stroke patients from these countries but also the risk factors, as well as stroke severity and short term outcome. Results – The gender related distribution of patients was similar to those found in the European Survey, whereas the mean age of patients at stroke onset was similar in the two countries but lower by four years. Although the length of hospital stay was significantly different in the two countries it was still much shorter (about half) than in most reports from western European countries. The overall fatality rate in both databases, regardless of gender was comparable to averages from Europe and other countries. In both countries we found a high number of risk factors, frequently overlapping. The prevalence of risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidaemia) was higher than those reported in other countries, which can explain the high ratio of recurring stroke. Discussion – In summary, the comparatively analyzed data from the two large databases showed several similarities, especially regarding the high number of modifiable risk factors, and as such further effort is needed regarding primary prevention.