Clinical Neuroscience

[Emotion-related brain regions (in English language)]

SZILY Erika, KÉRI Szabolcs

MARCH 30, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(03-04)

[Converging data from human functional imaging in healthy subjects, neuropsychological studies of brain-damaged patients, and non-human neurophysiology indicate that emotional processing is linked to anatomically distinct and well-defined brain regions. A main characteristic of emotion-related brain regions (orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulated cortex, amygdala, insula) is their reciprocal anatomical connectivity with each other as well as with neuromodulatory systems (e.g., serotonergic dorsal raphe, cholinergic nucleus basalis of Meynert, and dopaminergic ventral tegmentum) and with other brain areas involved in sensory, motor, and cognitive functions. These structures mediate the representation of stimulus values, the affectleaden enhancement of sensory processing, and the predictions of values associated with actions in order to bias decision-making in uncertain situations. In this review, we discuss new results from the functional neuroanatomy of these brain circuits and outline their significance in the emergence of various psychopathological phenomena.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[József Czopf MD, professor]

KOMOLY Sámuel, ILLÉS Zsolt, KONDÁKOR István

Clinical Neuroscience

[Evidence for the expression of parathyroid hormone 2 receptor in the human brainstem (in English language)]

BAGÓ Attila G., PALKOVITS Miklós, TED B. Usdin, SERESS László, DOBOLYI Árpád

[Background and purpose - The parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is a G protein coupled receptor. Pharmacological and anatomical evidence suggests that the recently identified tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues is, and parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptide are not, its endogenous ligand. Initial functional studies suggest that the PTH2R is involved in the regulation of viscerosensory information processing. As a first step towards clinical applications, herein we describe the presence of the PTH2R in the human brainstem. Material and methods - Total RNA was isolated from postmortem human cortical and brainstem samples for RT-PCR. Good quality RNA, as assessed on formaldehyde gel, was reverse transcribed. The combined cDNA products were used as template in PCR reactions with primer pairs specific for the human PTH2R. In addition, PTH2R immunolabelling was performed on free floating sections of the human medulla oblongata using fluorescent amplification immunochemistry. Results - Specific bands in the RT-PCR experiments and sequencing of PCR products demonstrated the expression of PTH2R mRNA in the human brainstem. A high density of PTH2R-immunoreactive fibers was found in brain regions of the medulla oblongata including the nucleus of the solitary tract, the spinal trigeminal nucleus, and the dorsal reticular nucleus of the medulla. Conclusion - Independent demonstration of the presence of PTH2R mRNA and immunoreactivity supports the specific expression of the PTH2R in the human brainstem. The distribution of PTH2R-immunoreactive fibers in viscerosensory brain regions is similar to that reported in mouse and rat suggesting a similar role of the PTH2R in human as in rodents. This finding will have important implications when experimental data obtained on the function of the TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system in rodents are to be utilized in human.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Prevalence of stroke/cardiovascular risk factors in rural Hungary - A cross-sectional descriptive study (in English language)]

BODO Michael, THURÓCZY György, PÁNCZÉL Gyula, SIPOS Kornél, ILIÁS Lajos, SZÕNYI Péter, MIKE Bodó Jr, NEBELLA Tamás, BÁNYÁSZ Attila, NAGY Zoltán

[A multi-faceted survey was conducted in 1992-94 to ascertain the somatic, mental and socio-economic conditions of the residents of a village in eastern Hungary. Here we report data on prevalence of somatic disorders from the survey. Objectives - a) To collect and compare prevalence of known cardiovascular disease, including stroke risk factors, in a specific population (a Hungarian village); b) to test a computer-based mass screening device ("Cerberus") designed to identify individuals in the test population at high risk for stroke; c) to compare results obtained with Cerberus with known stroke risk/cardiovascular disease factors and traditional medical records. Methods - A cross-sectional survey (546 subjects) was conducted in Csengersima in the early 1990s, using the Cerberus screening system, which includes: 1. a questionnaire addressing the risk factors for stroke/cardiovascular disease; 2. amplifiers to record the pulse waves of cerebral (rheoencephalography) and peripheral arteries, electrocardiogram and electroencephalogram. Additionally, subjects were measured for carotid stenosis by Doppler ultrasound and 12-lead electrocardiogram; they were also screened for blood cholesterol, glucose, and triglyceride levels. Findings - Prevalence of the following stroke risk factors was identified: overweight, 63.25%; sclerotic brain arteries by rheoencephalogram, 54.29%; heart disease, 37.92%; pathologic carotid flow, 34.24%; smoking, 30.55%; high blood cholesterol, 28.70%; hypertension, 27.83%; high triglyceride, 24.35%; abnormality of electrocardiogram, 20%; high glucose, 15.95%; symptoms of transient ischemic attack, 16.07%; alcohol abuse, 6.74%; and diabetes, 4.53%. Conclusion - The study demonstrates a possible model for primary cardiovascular disease/stroke prevention. The simple, noninvasive test uses the bioimpedance method of measurement. This method offers a standardizable, costeffective, practical technique for mass screenings by identifying the population at high risk for cardiovascular disturbances, especially cerebrovascular disease. In this model, the rheoencephalogram can detect cerebrovascular arteriosclerosis in the susceptibility/presymptomatic phase, earlier than the Doppler ultrasound technique. The method also provides a model for storing analog physiological signals in a computer-based medical record and the first steps of turning it into an expert system also tested.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Risk of mental disorders, their changes and somatic consideration in rural Hungary (in English language)]

SIPOS Kornél, BODO Michael, MAY Zsolt, LENDVAI Balázs, PIROS Andrea, SPITZER Nóra, PATAKY Ilona, NAGY Zoltán, BÁNYÁSZ Attila

[Objective - Although the primary purpose of the study reported here was to identify stroke risk factors among the residents of a village in eastern Hungary, the study also included a multi-faceted survey conducted in 1992-94 to ascertain the somatic, mental and socio-economic conditions of the residents. Here we report data from the survey on prevalence of mental disorders (a cross-sectional descriptive study). Method - The screenings included the following tests administered to 535 subjects: anxiety, depression, dementia, neurosis were measured; recent medical records were compared to survey data for 330 of the same subjects. Findings - The summary of prevalence of mental disorders measured in this study was as follows: anxiety 34.7% (severe), dementia 44.68% (mild), depression 66% (mild), 15.94% (medium), 7.88% (severe), neurosis 66.73% (mild, medium, and severe). Medical records maintained by village physicians since 1960 differed from the results obtained in the present study. A treatment gap was observed between mental health treatment for neurosis, as indicated by medical records, and the diagnostic prevalence of neurosis as measured by the survey instruments: there were three times as many people diagnosed as neurotic in the survey as had been noted in village medical records. Additionally, the unique position of cerebrovascular alteration was established between the mental and somatic factors. Conclusion - The study demonstrates the successful simultaneous collection of a wide spectrum of data on somatic conditions, mental disorders, and socio-economic status of the subjects. The study showed that 1. patientcentered medical care can simultaneously address both somatic and mental factors; 2. it is possible to decrease the treatment gap in mental health; 3. there is value in systematic collection of data in order to optimize the planning of prevention, health care costs and decision making.]

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[Chosen, possessed, epileptic]

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Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

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[From life events to symptoms of anxiety and depression: the role of dysfunctional attitudes and coping]

MÉSZÁROS Veronika, AJTAY Gyöngyi, FODOR Kinga, KOMLÓSI Sarolta, BOROSS Viktor, BARNA Csilla, UDVARDY-MÉSZÁROS Ágnes, PERCZEL Forintos Dóra

[The aim of the present study was a systematic path-analytical investigation between the effects of life events, dysfunctional attitudes and coping strategies in relation with the exhibited depressive and anxiety symptoms in patients with mental disorders. Methods - Self-report data of 234 patients from our outpatient psychotherapy unit were analyzed. Life events, dysfunctional attitudes, coping strategies as well as symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed by self-administerd questionnaires. Statistical methods included structural equation modelling, which enables the estimation of the magnitude and strength of individual variables within an overarching casual model, thus yielding a complex view on the possible processes underlying the development of the clinical symptoms of anxiety and depression. Results - Our findings indicate that both the number of negative life events and their subjectively experienced intensity contributed to the increase of dysfunctional attitudes. The presence of dysfunctional attitudes decreased the use of problem-focused coping strategies and increased the use of emotion-focused coping strategies. The use of problem-focused coping decreased symptom occurrence and emotion-focused coping strategies increased the frequency of symptoms of anxiety and depression. Our findings suggest that dysfunctional need for achievement and perfectionism directly increase the probability of depressive symptom manifestation. The attitude of external locus of control showed a significant relationship with anxiety symptoms through emotion-focused coping strategies and directly as well. Conclusion - Restructuring dysfunctional attitudes and developing problem-focused coping strategies are an important part of psychotherapeutic interventions aiming to decrease anxiety and depressive symptoms.]

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Modern health worries in patients with affective disorders. A pilot study

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Background - Modern health worries (MHWs) are asso­ciated with various indicators of negative affect, conspiracy theories, and paranormal beliefs in healthy individuals. Purpose - The current pilot study aimed to assess MHWs and indicators of negative affect in patients with affective disorders (N = 66), as well as the possible associations between MHWs and paranoid and schizophrenic tendencies. Results - Compared to somatic patients, psychiatric patients showed higher levels of MHWs, somatosensory amplification, health anxiety, and somatic symptoms. Medium level associations between MHWs and paranoid (r = 0.35, p < 0.01) and schizophrenic (r = 0.37, p < 0.01) tendencies were also revealed. Somatosensory amplification (β = 0.452, p < 0.001) and paranoia (β = 0.281, p < 0.01) significantly contributed to MHWs in multiple linear regression analysis (R2 = 0.323, p < 0.001). Discussion - High (i.e. pathological) levels of negative affect can impact a number of related characteristics. Non-pathological paranoid tendencies might contribute to MHWs. The identification of paranoid tendencies seems to be relevant for the treatment of psychiatric patients exhibiting MHWs. Conclusion - Patients with affective disorders are characterized by higher levels of modern health worries, health anxiety, and somatosensory amplification. Modern health worries are associated with paranoid tendencies.

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[The changing concept of the metabolic syndrome in the past two decades]

HALMOS Tamás, SUBA Ilona

[The introduction of the concept of the metabolic syndrome (MS) (1988) had a great significance from both a theoretical and a clinical point of view. The concept and the assesment of this syndrome has been widely criticized during the past two decades, however, many new components and even new diseases have been added to its defintion. These significant changes motivated us to complete and modify our previous review on this topic published in this journal more than ten years ago. In addition to the classical concept of MS, we discuss its various definitions, in which no consensus has been reached. Besides the two characteristic features, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism, we discuss the etiological role of endothelial dysfunction, overactivity of the symphato-adrenal system, endocrine activity of the adipose tissue, and low-degree inflammation. We also discuss the roles of the Peroxisome- Proliferator Activated Receptor system and the ubiquitin proteasome system in certain metabolic and inflammatory processes. Recently, the causal unity of the syndrome has been questioned, which has generated an extended and still ongoing debate. For the clinicians, however, the most important fact is that individuals with the characteristic symptoms of the syndrome represent a significant number of the population and are at hight risk of severe cardiovascular conditions. Finally, we outline the newly discovered relationships of the syndrome with other diseases that have a great public health importance, such as cancers, Alzheimer disease, sleep apnoe, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We also discuss the supposed common pathomechanisms of these conditions. These associations further increase the significance of MS in terms of both therapy and prevention.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Risk of mental disorders, their changes and somatic consideration in rural Hungary (in English language)]

SIPOS Kornél, BODO Michael, MAY Zsolt, LENDVAI Balázs, PIROS Andrea, SPITZER Nóra, PATAKY Ilona, NAGY Zoltán, BÁNYÁSZ Attila

[Objective - Although the primary purpose of the study reported here was to identify stroke risk factors among the residents of a village in eastern Hungary, the study also included a multi-faceted survey conducted in 1992-94 to ascertain the somatic, mental and socio-economic conditions of the residents. Here we report data from the survey on prevalence of mental disorders (a cross-sectional descriptive study). Method - The screenings included the following tests administered to 535 subjects: anxiety, depression, dementia, neurosis were measured; recent medical records were compared to survey data for 330 of the same subjects. Findings - The summary of prevalence of mental disorders measured in this study was as follows: anxiety 34.7% (severe), dementia 44.68% (mild), depression 66% (mild), 15.94% (medium), 7.88% (severe), neurosis 66.73% (mild, medium, and severe). Medical records maintained by village physicians since 1960 differed from the results obtained in the present study. A treatment gap was observed between mental health treatment for neurosis, as indicated by medical records, and the diagnostic prevalence of neurosis as measured by the survey instruments: there were three times as many people diagnosed as neurotic in the survey as had been noted in village medical records. Additionally, the unique position of cerebrovascular alteration was established between the mental and somatic factors. Conclusion - The study demonstrates the successful simultaneous collection of a wide spectrum of data on somatic conditions, mental disorders, and socio-economic status of the subjects. The study showed that 1. patientcentered medical care can simultaneously address both somatic and mental factors; 2. it is possible to decrease the treatment gap in mental health; 3. there is value in systematic collection of data in order to optimize the planning of prevention, health care costs and decision making.]