Clinical Neuroscience

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HALÁSZ Péter

JULY 30, 2013

Clinical Neuroscience - 2013;66(07-08)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Identification of new biomarkers (translational studies)]

KOMOLY Sámuel, KIEFER Zoltán

Clinical Neuroscience

[Survey of adults with epilepsy in Hungary: health related quality of life and costs]

PÉNTEK Márta, BERECZKI Dániel, GULÁCSI László, MIKUDINA Boglárka, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, JUHOS Vera, BAJI Petra, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Disease burden of epilepsy in Hungary is underexplored. The aim of our study was to assess the quality of life and costs of adults with epilepsy. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two hospital based outpatient neurology centres involving consecutive patients with epilepsy. Demography, clinical characteristics, health status (EQ-5D) and health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed. Cost calculation was performed from the societal perspective. Results - Altogether 100 patients (women 58%) were involved, their mean age was 37.6 (SD=12.5) years. Disease duration was 15.0 (SD=12.1) years on average and 22 (22%) patients were disability pensioners. The EQ- 5D score was mean 0.83 (SD=0.24) which is significantly lower than the age-matched population norm (p=0.017). Pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression are the most problematic health dimensions. The annual cost per patient was mean 2421 (SD=3249) Euros (679 397 SD=911 783 HUF; conversion: 1 Euro=280.6 HUF), distribution between direct medical, direct non-medical and indirect costs was 33%, 18% or 49%. Patients with seizure in the past 12 months have higher cost on avergare than the asymptomatic subsample (3119 vs. 988 Euros/patient/year; 935 481 vs. 277 209 HUF/patient/year). Conclusion - Adults with epilepsy have significantly worse health status by the EQ-5D than the gender and age matched Hungarian general population. Disease related costs are significant especially in cases with seizure, productivity loss related costs are dominant. Our study provides basic data for clinical and sustainable health care financing decisions.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Minor physical anomalies in autism]

TÉNYI Tamás, JEGES Sára, HALMAI Tamás, CSÁBI Györgyi

[Background and purpose - Minor physical anomalies are mild, clinically and cosmetically insignificant errors of morphogenesis which have a prenatal origin and may bear major informational value for diagnostic, prognostic and epidemiological purposes. Since both the central nervous system and the skin are derived from the same ectodermal tissue in utero, minor physical anomalies can be external markers of abnormal brain development and they appear more commonly in neurodevelopmental disorders. In a recently published meta-analysis Ozgen et al. have published the results of seven studies - all have used the Waldrop Scale which contains 18 minor physical anomalies - and reported on the higher prevalence of minor physical anomalies among patients with autism. There are only a very few data on the individual analysis of the prevalence of minor physical anomalies in autism. Methods - In our study we have studied the prevalence of 57 minor physical anomalies in 20 patients with autism and in 20 matched control subjects by the use of the Méhes Scale. Results - The prevalence of minor physical anomalies was significantly higher in the autism group (p<0.001). The individual analysis of the 57 minor physical anomalies showed the significantly more frequent apperance of four signs (primitive shape of ear p=0.047, abnormal philtrum p=0.001, clinodactylia p=0.002, wide distance between toes 1 and 2 p=0.003). No correlation was found between the four significantly more common minor physical anomalies. Conclusion - The higher prevalence of minor physical anomalies in autism supports the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of the disorder and the individual analysis of minor physical anomalies can help to understand the nature of the neurodevelopmental defect.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Shunt insufficiency due to knot formation in the peritoneal catheter]

FEKETE Gábor, NAGY Andrea, PATAKI István, BOGNÁR László, NOVÁK László

[The authors report a rare case of the peripheral obstruction of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Premature baby was operated on hydrocephalus due to germinal matrix bleeding. After two months of implantation of venticuloperitoneal shunt peripheral insufficiency of the system was emerged. During the shunt revision extensive knot formation became visible. We simply cut the catheter above the knot and the working shunt was replaced into the abdominal cavity. The postoperative course was uneventful and the baby was free of complaints for more than one year. The pathomechanism of knot formation is not clear thus the discovery of the problem during the operation is an unexpected event. In our opinion tight knot cannot be spontaneously formed intraabdominally. Loose knots can be developed and can reduce the capacity of liquor flow. We think that the knot tightens during pulling out. Longer peritoneal catheters can precipitate multiple looping and/or axial torquations and increase the peripheral resistance of the shunt. In such cases when the pulling out is challenged conversion to laparotomy is suggested.]

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