Clinical Neuroscience

[Before setout...]

Z. I.

MARCH 23, 1950

Clinical Neuroscience - 1950;3(01)

[The first psychiatric and neurological journal in Hungary is now launched. The support of the Academy of Sciences and the Medical-Health Trade Union made it possible to make up for the omission made by the pseudo-scientific cultural policy of the reactionary period. It has already happened in the past that Hungarian medicine started to flourish. Developments in the fields of neurophysiology, neurology and psychiatry began in the second half of the last century, during which Hungarian researchers were connected to the leading medical discoveries of the time in the world.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[The value of newer liver function tests in cases of alcoholism chronicus ]

CSORBA Antal , LÁNG Sándor

[In mild cases of chronic alcoholism with newer liver function tests for liver damage can be detected in approx. 50%, in more severe clinical cases in 90%. In mild cases there is no globulin proliferation, in more severe cases it is most often.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Hydrocephalus-induced ventricular diverticulum in the cistern ambiens]

KAJTOR Ferenc, HABERLAND Katalin

[The authors report 5 cases of cerebral ventricular dysfunction developed as a result of occlusive hydrocephalus, 3 of which with one or both lateral chambers and 2 traveling with the III. chamber. Clinical, pneumographic, macroscopic, and microscopic autopsy findings and the likely mechanism of diverticulum formation are described. It is found that the detection of a significant size diverticulum by pneumography is a well-marketed diagnostic and prognostic physiologically very favorable, although not easy, surgical solution.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Influence of blood glucose balance with ergotamine content (Gynergen)]

ZÁDOR Imre, KOVÁCS M. Erzsébet

[A review of the literature in recent years found no report on the effects of ergotamine (Gynergen) on blood glucose, but 20 years ago, Hetényi reported essentially similar results based on studies in two patients. He stressed that in all likelihood, Ergotamine does not delay intestinal absorption.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[New aspects of Friedreich's disease]

LEHOCZKY Tibor, NÉMETH Jenő

[4 clinical observations of Friedreich's disease. 3 male, 1 female: three "pure" forms, one with amyotrophic lat. sclerosis. Heredofamilial trait in 3 cases: two patients had pes excavatus in the brother, the second patient had Dupuytren's contacture of the little finger. The 3rd case had a marked myocardial laesio; this was absent in the others. This therefore does not support the hypothesis that myocarditis and neurological lesions are caused by a common toxic agent.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Familiaris myasthenia]

CSORBA Antal

[The significantly higher prevalence of the pathology among women, menstruation, natural or artificial menopause, the undoubted influence of pregnancy, persistent thymus, etc., demonstrate the aetiological importance of endocrine factors. It is probable that the so-called constitutional factor is nothing more than an as yet unknown disorder of the endocrine system and that it forms the basis of the chemical mediator disorder.]

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Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Acute transverse myelitis after inactivated COVID-19 vaccine

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ERDEM Şimşek Nazan, DEMIRCI Seden, ÖZEL Tuğba , MAMADOVA Khalida, KARAALI Kamil , ÇELIK Tuğba Havva , ÖZKAYNAK Sibel Sehür

Vaccines against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have been rapidly developed to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. There is increasing safety concerns regarding COVID-19 vaccines. We report a 78-year old woman who was presented with tetraparesis, paresthesias of bilateral upper extremities, and urinary retention of one-day duration. Three weeks before these symptoms, she was vaccinated with CoronaVAC vaccine (Sinovac Life Sciences, China). Spine magnetic resonance imaging showed longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (TM) from the C1 to the T3 spinal cord segment. An extensive diagnostic workup was performed to exclude other possible causes of TM. We suggest that longitudinally extensive TM may be associated with COVID-19 vaccination in this case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of longitudinally extensive TM developing after CoronaVac vaccination. Clinicians should be aware of neurological symptoms after vaccination of COVID-19.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

FOLYOVICH András, BERECZKI Dániel, VÁRALLYAY György, BAKOS Mária, BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Clinical Neuroscience

Effects of valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam on Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio

YASAR Altun, ERDOGAN Yasar

Aim - To evaluate P-wave dispersion before and after antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment as well as to investigate the risk of ventricular repolarization using the Tpeak-Tend (Tp-e) interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with epileptic disorder. Methods - A total of 63 patients receiving AED therapy and 35 healthy adults were included. ECG recordings were obtained before and 3 months after anti-epileptic treatment among patients with epilepsy. For both groups, Tp-e and Tp-e/QT ratio were measured using a 12-lead ECG device. Results - Tp-e interval, Tpe/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were found to be higher in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05, for all), while QTmax ratio was significantly lower in the patient group. After 3 months of AED therapy, significant increases in QT max, QTc max, QTcd, Tp-e, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc were found among the patients (p<0.05). When the arrhythmic effects of the drugs before and after treatment were compared, especially in the valproic acid group, there were significant increases in Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc values after three months of treatment (p<0.05). Carbamazepine and levetiracetam groups were not statistically significant in terms of pre- and post-treatment values. Conclusions - It was concluded that an arrhythmogenic environment may be associated with the disease, and patients who received AED monotherapy may need to be followed up more closely for arrhythmia.

Hypertension and nephrology

[Current evidence on the accuracy and precision of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring]

VÉGH Anna, REUSZ S György

[Purpose of review: Assessing cardiac output (CO) is an important part of monitoring the hemodynamically unstable patients. Different non-invasive CO measurement devices are currently available, that can be useful in various clinical situations. The purpose of this article is to review current literature on commonly employed methods especially regarding their accuracy and precision. Results: Most of the devices, especially the non-invasive ones have the disadvantage of questionable accuracy and precision. Generally speaking, the more a method is based on assumptions and mathematical models, the less precise it will be. There is also significant heterogeneity between individual studies. Clinically it is important to consider the purpose of the measurement before choosing a method. In terms of accuracy the most reliable ones are, the ones that are based on simple physical principles and minimal assumptions, for example transthoracic echocardiography, and thermodilution. Conclusions: To have better comparability between individual studies it would be imperative to have standardized study protocols regarding the number of cardiac cycles assessed, the used method, the clinical environment, the age and clinical condition of the study population.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Sleep habits among preschool- and schoolchildren]

OLÁH András, FUSZ Katalin, RITECZ Bernadett, BALOGH Brigitta, TAKÁCS Krisztina, SOMLAI Eszter, RAPOSA L. Bence

[Objective - Our aim is to evaluate sleep habits, sleep quality and influencing factors among preschool- and schoolchildren. Method - Two questionnaires were recorded. Questionnaire 1 dealt with sleeping habits, breastfeeding and health behavior of preschool children and infant, and it contained the abbreviated version of the Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire. Questionnaire 2 dealt with health behavior and the application of sleep hygiene rules, as well as it contained the Athens Insomnia Scale. Subjects - We assessed a total of 1063 questionnaires: 516 kindergarten children participated in our online survey across the country; 547 primary and secondary school students participated in the 2nd questionnaire survey in Szolnok. Results - Parents’ observation shows that the average nighttime sleeping time of kindergarten children is 10 hours 20 minutes on weekdays and 10 hours 36 minutes on weekends. The most popular sleeping habits in kindergarten age: teal reading (65.1%) and co-sleeping (42.8%). Parents of infants used breastfeeding (50.4%) and rocking (43.2%) most frequently before sleep. Co-sleeping has a positive influence on the length of lactation. Among the preschool sleeping habits we have proved a number of positive effects of teal reading, while watching television have negative effects. The sleep quality of school-age children according to the Athens Insomnia Scale is 6.11 points (SD: 4.11), 19% of the children are insomniac. Their sleep time is 7 hours 31 minutes on weekdays and 9 hours 30 minutes on weekends. The usage of good health behavior and sleep hygiene rules positively influence sleep quality and sleep duration. Conclusions - With our results, we would like to draw the attention of children and parents to the importance of sleeping and using sleep hygiene rules.]