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Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 10, 2018

[Prognostic role of arterial stiffness in IgA nephropathy]

SÁGI Balázs, KÉSŐI István, VAS Tibor, CSIKY Botond, KOVÁCS Tibor, NAGY Judit

[Background: Arterial stiffness has a prognostic role in chronic cardiovascular diseases. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) determined by the carotid-femoral pulse detection is accepted as a gold standard method. Further diagnostic procedures are in use to assess the arterial stiffness including the finger photoplethysmography. The prognostic role of this method is limited in chronic renal diseases. The goal of our investigation was to determine the prognostic significance of the stiffness index (SIDVP) measured by the photoplethysmographic method in IgA nephropathy. Patients and methods: One hundred and three histologically proved IgA nephropathy patients with chronic kidney disease stage 1-4 were investigated (67 male, 36 female, 45 ± 11 years) and followed for an average 65 (6-107) months. The stiffness index was determined by the volume alteration of the digital artery during the cardiac cycle (Pulse Trace system, Micro Medical, Gilingham, Kent, UK). The primary combined end point was total mortality, major cardiovascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction or cardiovascular procedure, for example revascularisation) plus achieving end stage renal disease. The secondary end points were cardiovascular and renal end points alone. Results: The patients with increased stiffness index (> 10 m/s) had significantly more combined primary end point events (10/60 vs. 19/43, P = 0.015). In case of the secondary end points the renal end points were significantly more frequent in patients with higher stiffness index. Stiffness index has also proved to be an independent predictor on survival from other cardiovascular risk factors (age, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, lipid disturbances and decrease of renal function) using the Cox regression model in IgA nephropathy. Every 1 m/s increase in stiffness index resulted a 17% gain in the occurrence of the combined primary end point. Conclusions: Stiffness index determined by finger photoplethysmography is an eligible parameter to assess the prognosis in IgA nephropathy. Increased stiffness index in IgA nephropathy seems to be a good prognostic tool for identification of higher risk patients.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 20, 2018

[Does venous congestion decrease renal function - fiction or real?]

KOPITKÓ Csaba, MEDVE László, GONDOS Tibor

[Venous congestion can result in dysfunction of several organs. Although experimental data on renal dysfunction caused by venous congestion were already published about 90 years ago, those were difficult to extrapolate to humans, due to significant interracial differences. Acute pre-renal, or volume-sensitive kidney injury might respond to volume replacement; however, overt fluid resuscitation with or without right ventricular dysfunction can result in elevated central venous pressure. The glomerular capillary blood pressure, i. e. net filtration pressure in a single glomerulus is about 10 mmHg. Kidney dysfunction can both increase intra-abdominal pressure or elevate central venous pressure with or without decreased mean arterial pressure, can lead to renal dysfunction. In studies among patients with heart failure, or after cardiac or abdominal surgery, the increase of central venous pressure or intra-abdominal pressure above 8 mmHg resulted in impaired kidney function. This review summarizes both pre-clinical and clinical data on the role of intra-abdominal hypertension and venous congestion in the development of acute kidney injury.]

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 20, 2018

[Hungarian Vasculitis Registry – results of the first five years]

HARIS Ágnes, TISLÉR András, ONDRIK Zoltán, FILE Ibolya, MÁTYUS János, ZSARGÓ Eszter, DEÁK György, AMBRUS Csaba

[Launching the Hungarian Vasculitis Registry aimed to collect information about prevalence and outcome of our patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis, and treatment protocols of the disease. The on-line data collection has been developing dynamically since its initiation five years ago, presently 278 patients’ files are available. Patients’ mean age is 58.2±14.5 years, 62% are women; their disease is associated with c-ANCA positivity in 51% and p-ANCA in 49%. At diagnosis GFR was 24.6±21.6 ml/min/1,73 m2, that time 29%, during the total follow up 39% of the registered subjects needed dialysis. Renal replacement therapy could be discontinued in 23% of them. In cases with focal histological changes, also with upper respiratory tract and skin involvement dialysis was significantly less frequently necessary, which underlines the importance of early diagnosis. In induction therapy steroid was administered for 94% of the patients, 85% of them got cyclophosphamide, 59% was treated by plasmapheresis, 11% got rituximab. Maintenance treat ment contained steroid in 80%, per os cyclophosphamide in 23%, parenteral cyclophosphamide in 22%, furthermore 40% of the patients got azathioprin, 8 subjects got mycophenolate and 6 got methotrexate. Median follow up was 30 months (IQR 6-78), during which period 20% of the patients died, 5% got kidney transplantation, and 5% were lost to follow up. Median survival was 14.8 years, five years survival was 85%, and ten years survival was 70%. Long term survival in patients with c-ANCA vasculitis seemed better comparing to p-ANCA vasculitis, but when correcting by age this difference disappeared. Predictors of death were age and dialysis dependent renal failure. Relapses developed in 27% of patients, 28% of them presented in the first year, 21% suffered it after five years of care. Collected data by the Hungarian Vasculitis Registry shows our society’s successful professional activity. Our results are comparable to the published data in the literature, yet there are several areas in our care where further improvements are warranted in order to increase our patient’s survival and quality of life.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018

[Differential diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia]

NÉMETH Zsófia, DEÁK György

[Hyponatraemia (serum sodium concentration < 136 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality that inceases the risk of both in-hospital, and outpatient mortality. Antidiuretic hormone action or low glomerular fitration rate or low excretable osmoles or their combination are involved in its pathogenesis. Differential diagnosis is based on medical and medication histories, serum- and urine osmolality and urine sodium concentration. Measurement of fractional excretions of urea and uric acid help identifying low effective circulting volume, renal hypoperfusion. Symptomatic hyponatraemia or an acute decrease of serum sodium concentration exceeding 10 mmol/l should be treated with 3% NaCl to avoid impending threat to life. The principles of the treatment of chronic hyponatraemia are restriction of water intake and elimination of etiologic factor(s) (eg. medications - most often thiazides). In case of contracted axtracellular volume, isotonic saline should be given. In case of euvolaemia, restriciton of water intake is fundamental. In case of expanded extracellular volume, (heart failure, liver cirrhosis, nephrosis), water and NaCl intake should be restricted along with aldosteron antagonist and loop diuretic therapy. In chronic hyponatraemia, the rise of serum sodium concentration should not exceed 10 mmol/l during the first 24 hours and 8 mmol/l/day thereafter. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

A rare condition mimicking stroke: Diabetic uremic encephalopathy

TEKESIN Aysel, ERDAL Yuksel, MAHMUTOGLU Soydan Abdullah, HAKYEMEZ Ahmet, EMRE Ufuk

Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a metabolic disorder associated with acute or chronic renal failure. It is characterized by the acute or subacute onset of reversible neurological symptoms and specific imaging findings. It is uncommon for uremic encephalopathy to be associated with acute bilateral lesions of the basal ganglia in diabetic uremic patients, and this can be seen most often in Asian patients. Here, we report a patient with diabetic uremic encephalopathy and bilateral basal ganglia lesions who developed acute onset dysarthria. The clinical and magnetic resonance brain imaging findings resolved after hemodialysis treatment.

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 14, 2018

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 14, 2018

[Role of ketoanalogue amino acids and diet in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease]

KISS István, HARIS Ágnes, DEÁK György

[Low protein diet is an important component of the non-pharmacological treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Along with the diet it is important to maintain appropriate energy intake to avoid malnutrition. It is recommended to supplement low protein diet (0.6-0.7 g protein/kg body weight/day) with essential amino acids and their ketoanalogues (ketoacids) in a dose of 1 tablet/8-10 kg body weight if there is a threat of protein malnutrition (eg. vegan diet). Very low protein diet (0.3-0.4 g protein/kg body weight/day) should be supplemented with ketoacids in a dose of 1 tablet/5 kg body weight. Low protein diet is recommended for patients with CKD stage 3 and progressively declining renal function, or nephrotic syndrome; in diabetic nephropathy; in CKD stage 4 and non-dialyzed CKD stage 5. Nephroprotective effect of very low protein diet is primarily expected is patients with an eGFR below 20-25 ml/min/1.73 m2 and good compliance. Dietary protein restriction may diminish acidosis and proteinuria, slow the progression of CKD and delay initiation of dialysis. Diets reduced in protein supplemented with appropriate energy intake and ketoacids are nutritionally safe. Dietary education and guidance of patients by qualified dietitians are of great importance in nephrology clinics. We illustrate the main points of our review with case reports.]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 12, 2018

[Treatment of hypertension in kidney transplant patients]

KOVÁCS Tibor, WAGNER László

[Most of the renal transplant recipients suffer from hypertension. Hypertension substantially contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality in this population. The recommendation of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension and the international guidelines suggest to achieve less than 130/80 mmHg as target blood pressure in these patients. Several factors may be in the background of hypertension after kidney transplantation, which can be summarized as factors from the recipient-side, the donorside and factors provoked by transplantation itself. In most of the cases early after transplantation high doses of immunosuppressive drugs (especially calcineurin inhibitors and steroids) are responsible for the increased blood pressure. There are some further special methods apart from the general recommendations which are needed during the examination of hypertension of kidney transplant patients: e.g. measurement of blood trough-level of immunosuppressive drugs, investigation of bone-mineral disorder, screening for the level and causes of anaemia, check-up of the renal graft circulation. Kidney transplant patients suffering from hypertension usually need more than two antihypertensive drugs beyond the use of non-pharmaceutical antihypertensive methods. In the early posttransplantation period calcium channel blockers are preferred antihypertensive medications, because they counterbalance the vasoconstrictive effect of calcineurin inhibitors. The administration of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors are rather suggested after the stabilization of renal function (from the 1-3 months posttransplantation). When designing antihypertensive strategy, comorbidities and special factors should be regarded as well, especially volume overload, proteinuria, allograft function (GFR), diabetes, other cardiovascular risk factors, previous cardiovascular events. The setup of an individual therapeutical strategy is advised in view of all these factors, which is different according to the timing after transplantation: the perioperative, the early postoperative phases and from 1-3 months after transplantation have special focuses.]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 12, 2018

[Hyperuricemia and cardiovascular risk: new treat to target principle in focus]

ALFÖLDI Sándor

[Hyperuricemia is frequent and its prevalence is increasing as it correlates with obesity and metabolic syndrome by several different mechanisms. Furthermore, recently several data are available for the cardiovascular and renal protective effect of allopurinol in the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. The new European EULAR guidelines suggested treat to target principle in urat lowering therapy of gout. The uric acid target is below 360 µmol/l in mild to moderate gout. The guidelines unequivocally stated, that allopurinol is the first line uric acid lowering drug. Allopurinol treatment should be started immediately at the diagnosis and should be continued lifelong.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2018

Can high uric acid levels be an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke due to large-artery atherosclerosis?

ACAR Türkan, ARAS Guzey Yesim, GÜL Sinem Sidika, ACAR Atılgan Bilgehan

Introduction - Uric acid is a molecule that is known to act as a natural antioxidant in acute oxidative stress conditions such as acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Although there are several studies on the prognostic value of serum uric acid (UA) level, especially the AIS, its importance in ischemic stroke is still controversial. Our aim in this study is to investigate whether the serum UA level is an indicative biomarker in the large-artery atherosclerosis in the AIS etiology. Material and method - Of the patients admitted to Sakarya University Training and Research Hospital Depart-ment of Neurology between January 2017 and November 2017, 91 hospitalized patients, who had AIS diagnosis and had their uric acid levels measured, were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), smoking habit, obesity, gout, hyperlipidemia (HL) and renal failure were excluded from the study. Patients were classified as anterior system and posterior system infarct. Then, patients were divided into two groups, one with internal carotid artery (ICA) > 50% stenosis and the other with ICA < 50% stenosis according to carotid-vertebral artery doppler USG examination performed for etiology. Serum UA, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and indirect bilirubin levels of both groups were statistically compared. Results - In the comparison of serum UA values of ICA>50% stenosis and ICA<50% stenosis group of AIS patients, a statistically significant difference was found between the UA levels (p<0.000), but there was no difference between total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and indirect bilirubin values (p>0.05). Conclusion - High uric acid levels can be considered an independent, indicative risk factor for large-artery disease in AIS.