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Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 30, 2019

[Sequential therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma]

TORDAY László

[The incidence of renal carcinoma is on the rise in developed countries, with the tumor being among the 10 most common malignancies. However, the survival of patients with irresecable renal carcinoma has improved signifi cantly in recent years, mainly due to signifi cant advances in oncology treatment. The use of agents acting on the VEGF and mTOR signaling pathways is widespread and has become a standard clinical practice in fi rst and later line therapy. Recent clinical trials have provided many new drugs with new targets (cMET and AXL, FGFR, PD-1/PD-L1, CTLA-4) and combinations thereof, and have completely redrawn the treatment landscape of metastatic renal carcinoma and signifi cantly improved clinical results. This report reviews data on targeted drug therapy of renal cell carcinoma and discusses the therapeutic position of various drugs and combinations to our knowledge.]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 24, 2020

[Treatment of hypertension in patients with chronic renal failure]

SZLOVÁK Edina, SZILVESZTER Dolgos

[The prevalence of chronic renal failure and hypertension is steadily increasing worldwide. The risk of possible cardiovascular death in patient with advanced renal failure is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage renal failure. Therefore treating and achieving target blood pressure is important in order to slow renal function decline in parallel with cardiovascular risk reduction. However, guidelines do not specify a single blood pressure target to be achieved in patients with renal failure, but suggest evidence based, reno- and cardioprotective therapy. This paper summarizes the clinical practice of treating hypertension (drug and nondrug treatment, therapeutic algorithm, target value, effectiveness of therapy) in patients with chronic renal failure.]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 24, 2020

[Covid-19 and the kidney]

PATÓ Éva, DEÁK György

[Covid-19 pandemy has emerged from Wuhan, China in December 2019. The infection affects not only the lung but other organs such as the kidney, as well. The relation between Covid-19 infection and the kidney is bidirectional. On one hand, Covid-19 infection may cause kidney damage in 50-75% of the cases resulting in proteinuria, haematuria and acute kidney injury (AKI). The etiology of AKI is multifactorial. Main pathogenic mechanisms are direct proximal tubular cell damage, sepsis-related haemodinamic derangement, citokine storm and hypercoagulability. The virus enters proximal tubular cells and podocytes via the ACE2 receptor followed by multiplication in the lysomes and consequential cell lesion. Histopathology shows acute tubular necrosis and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. AKI is a strong predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. On the other hand, the risk of Covid-19 infection and mortality is substantially increased in patients with chronic kidney disease – especially in those with a kidney transplant or on dialysis – due to their immunocompromised status. Among haemodialysis patients, infection may spread very easily due to the possibility of getting contacted in the ambulance car or at the dialysis unit. The mortality rate of patients on renal replacement therapy with Covid-19 infection is 20-35%. In order to avoid mass infection it is obligatory to employ preventive measures and implement restricions along with (cohors) isolation of infected patients. In Hungary, every dialysis or kidney transplant patient with Covid-19 infection should be admitted to dedicated Covid-19 wards.]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 24, 2020

[Not all young, athletic university students have optimal blood pressure. Results of the May 2019 Measurement Month (MMM19)]

PATÓ Anna, NÉMETH Zoltán, JÁRAI Zoltán, KOLLER Ákos

[For about 100 years, it has been known that persistently high blood pressure (hypertension) is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease deaths, such as major risk factors for heart failure, myocardial infarction, stroke, kidney and eye disease. Unfortunately, one of the characteristics of hypertension is that it remains undetected for a long time until damage to one or more organs has already occurred. Therefore, it is very important that systemic blood pressure is monitored from time to time, especially above 45 years of age. The prevalence of hypertension is more than 35% in the Hungarian population. Recent data have pointed out that hypertension may occur at a younger age, although at a lower frequency. Our studies were conducted in the context of the May 2019 Measurement Month (MMM19), an international campaign that draws attention to hypertension and the lack of systematic screening at population level. We hypothesized that hypertension may occur in young, apparently healthy university students. The studies were conducted among students of the University of Physical Education (n = 33; 25 males, 8 females). The mean age was 24.3 years (20–34 years). To measure blood pressure, an automatic blood pressure monitor (Omron MIT5) was used, placed on individuals’ upper arms, as specified in the guidelines, in a relaxed, sitting position. The measurements were repeated three times at one-minute intervals and the average of the three measurements was statistically analyzed. Blood pressure values (mean ± SEM, averaged over 3 measurements) in the student population were systolic 121.9 ± 14.4 mmHg, diastolic 75.1 ± 9.1 mmHg, mean 90.7 ± 10.9 mmHg, and heart rate: 46.8 ± 5.3 mmHg. Although mean blood pressure was within the normal range, higher values were also found in some individuals. Systolic blood pressure fell by 33% due to elevated normal blood pressure, respectively of Grade 1 hypertension. These data confirmed our hypothesis that hypertension may occur at a young age, despite the fact that members of the study population exercise regularly, which is an important preventive factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. These results underscore the importance of regular blood pressure measurement in adolescents, which may reduce the global spread of hypertension and prevent the development of a number of cardiovascular diseases, including stroke, heart attack, renal failure and mental decline.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Polycystic kidney]

DOLGOS Szilveszter, TÁRNOKI Ádám Domonkos, TÁRNOKI Dávid László

[The most common monogenic nephropathy is a congenital, cystic, bulky process in the kidney that leads to a gradual deterioration in renal function. Renal failure is often associated with cystic liver or pancreatic lesions, cerebral artery aneurysm, or mitral prolapse.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Possibilities and limitations. Dietary difficulties of chronic renal failure in childhood]

REUSZ György, SZABÓ Adrienn

[In chronic kidney disease (CKD), the role of the kidney in assuring homeostasis is gradually deteriorating. Besides fluid, electrolyte and hormonal disturbances, detoxification and control of blood pressure is insufficient without external help. In children, in addition to achieving equilibrium it is also essential to ensure optimal physical and cognitive/psychological development. Adequate calorie intake is a major determinant of growth during infancy. Among the therapeutic options it is essential to ensure a proper diet. In addition to reflecting the special needs of renal failure in its composition, it must be palatable for the child. Children with kidney disease should have a normal energy diet. Protein intake should not be reduced from the baseline recommendation, but lower phosphorus and high bioavailability should be preferred. A low sodium and potassium diet is recommended for a significant proportion of patients and is based on dietary advice. Further, diet planning may be problematic if the child has special dietary requirements and is in need of nasogastric tube feeding. Because diet planning is a complex task, it is difficult to achieve optimal protein supply and mineral restriction along with high energy intake. In such cases, enteral nutrition with special formulas/ drinks developed for pediatric nutrition may provide a solution.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Cardiovascular risk assessment in chronic kidney disease, significance of left ventricular myocardial mass index]

SÁGI Balázs, KÉSŐI István, VAS Tibor, CSIKY Botond, NAGY Judit, KOVÁCS Tibor

[Introduction: Earlier studies have shown that cardiovascular (CV) mortality and morbidity in chronic kidney disease (CKD) often exceed their average population, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for CV disease. However, in CKD, the relationship between LVH, arterial stiffness (AS) and renal function has not yet been fully elucidated. Little data is available on their prognostic role. Aims of our study a) cross-sectional examination of the relationship between left ventricular mass index (LVMI), arterial vascular stiffness, and renal function, b) in our follow-up study, clarification of the LVMI, the prognostic role of AS in patients with CKD, IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Methods: In our cross-sectional study, 79 IgAN patients were examined in our clinic. The myocardial mass index (LVMI) was determined using an estimation formula after echocardiographic measurements. Arterial stiffness was measured using a photoplethizmography technique (PulseTrace) and characterized by the stiffness index (SI). The MDRD formula was used to estimate renal function (GFR) (eGFR, ml/min/1.73 m2). In the prognostic study the primary combined endpoint was total mortality, the most important CV events (stroke, myocardial infarction or cardiovascular interventions such as revascularization) and end stage renal disease. Secondary endpoints were CV and renal endpoints separately. Results: Of the 79 patients included in our cross-sectional study, 50 were men, with an average age of 46 ± 11 years. The mean value of LVMI was 106.66 ± 22.98 g/m2. Patients were divided into groups of 115 g/m2 for males considered to be abnormal and 95 g/m2 for women. LVMI is closely correlated with SI and inversely with eGFR (corr. coeff: 0.358; p <0.05 or -0.526; p <0.001). In case of LVH, SI was significantly higher in both sexes (p = 0.005 in males, p = 0.04 in females). In case of higher LVMI, renal function was significantly lower (p = 0.002 in males, p = 0.01 in females). Metabolic syndrome occurred in several cases in both sexes with LVH, but the difference was only significant in male patients (males 6 vs. 10, p = 0.008; females 2 vs. 4, p = 0.29). In our follow-up study, the presence of LVH in men significantly reduced survival in both primary and secondary endpoints, whereas in women there was no significant difference. Conclusion: In IgAN decreasing of renal function is closely related to left ventricular hypertrophy and vascular stiffness, as well as a close relationship was found between LVMI and AS. Reduced renal function is associated with an increase in LVMI and an increase in AS, which may result in a worse prognosis for both CV and renal outcomes. The underlying role of all these can be assumed to be a common vascular and myocardial pathological remodeling.]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[Oncological treatment on certain special cases]

FUTÓ Ildikó, HORVÁTH Dorottya Katalin, LANDHERR László

[Even in the absence of clinically signifi cant co-morbidities, cancer care is a major challenge for both patients and healthcare professionals. Routine anticancer treatment may be complicated by special clinical situations such as pregnancy or organ transplantation. The dosage of certain oncotherapy agents may be further affected by impaired renal and hepatic function or diabetes mellitus. These days, given the improved prognosis of cancerous diseases and increased survival, personalized therapy and prevention of long-term side effects is becoming particularly important, especially in the above-mentioned oncological situations. In this summary, we review the anticancer treatments recommended by ESMO in specifi c clinical situations.]