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Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[Covid-19 associated neurological disorders]

SZÔTS Mónika, PÉTERFI Anna, GERÖLY Júlia, NAGY Ferenc

[The clinical signs of SARS-CoV-2 infection has become more recognisable in recent times. In addition to common symptoms such as fever, cough, dyspnea, pneumonia and ageusia, less common complications can be identified, including many neurological manifestations. In this paper, we discuss three Covid-19 associated neurological disorders (Case 1: Covid-19 encephalitis, Case 2: Covid-19 organic headache, Case 3: SARS-CoV-2-infection and ischaemic stroke). We emphasize in our multiple case study that during the present pandemic, it is especially important for neurologists to be aware of the nervous system complications of the virus infection, thus saving unnecessary examinations and reducing the frequency of patients’ contact with health care personnel. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 18, 2020

[Digitally-assisted treatment planning in precision oncology]

PETÁK István, VÁLYI-NAGY István

[The progress of molecular information based on personalized precision medicine has reached a new milestone. Actually, about 6 million mutations of 600 genes may be related to the development of cancer, and on average, 3-4 of these “driver” mutations are present in each patient. Due to the progress in molecular diagnostics, we can now routinely identify the molecular profile of tumors in clinical settings. By clinical translation, there are actually available more than 125 targeted pharmaceuticals and hundreds of such therapies are under clinical trial. As a result, we have many first-line and licenced treatment options to be elected by molecular information as the optimal one for every patient. There is an increasing need for complex informatics solutions by medical software. Geneticists, molecular biologists, molecular pathologists, molecular pharmacologists are already using bioinformatics and interpretation software on their daily work. Today, online digital tools of artificial intelligence are also available for physicians for assisted treatment planning. Telemedicine, videoconferencing provide solutions for interdisciplinary virtual molecular tumor boards, which democratizes the access to precision oncology for all doctors and patients. ]

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 28, 2020

[The treatment of the locally advanced and the metastatic gastric cancer]

SIPŐCZ István

[Although signifi cant progress has been made in the treatment of stomach cancer recently, survival results are still quite modest. The purpose of this overview is to take a look into the history of the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic stomach cancer and to present the current treatment standards. It focuses on recent changes in perioperative treatment, as well as the changing of treatment of metastatic patients. The use of multiple line of palliative chemotherapy and the place of the available targeted treatments in metastatic tumours will be analysed in detail. The increasing use and the future possibilities of immunocheckpoint inhibitors will also be discussed. Molecular subtypes of gastric cancer are also mentioned as possible indicators of the choice of therapy. Finally, it intends to give therapeutic proposals to make recommendations to treat the disease taking into account the opportunities in Hungary.]

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 28, 2020

[Treatment sequencing in metastatic colorectal cancer]

MODEST D. P., PANT S., SARTORE-BIANCHI A.

[Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) remains incurable in most cases, but survival has improved with advances in cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted agents. However, the optimal use and sequencing of these agents across multiple lines of treatment is unclear. Here, we review current treatment approaches and optimal treatment sequencing across the fi rst-, second- and third-line settings in mCRC, including biological aspects affecting sequencing and rechallenge. Effective fi rst-line therapy is a key determinant of treatment outcomes and should be selected after considering both clinical factors and biological markers, notably RAS and BRAF. The second-line regimen choice depends on the systemic therapies given in fi rst-line. Anti-angiogenic agents (e.g. bevacizumab, ramucirumab and afl ibercept) are indicated for most patients, whereas epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors do not improve survival in the second-line setting. Molecular profi ling is important in thirdline treatment, with options in RAS wild-type patients including EGFR inhibitors (cetuximab or panitumumab), regorafenib and trifl uridine/tipiracil. Immunotherapy with pembrolizumab or nivolumab ± ipilimumab may be considered for patients with high microsatellite instability disease. Targeting HER2/neu amplifi cation shows promise for the subset of CRC tumours displaying this abnormality. Sequencing decisions are complicated by the potential for any treatment break or de-escalation to evoke a distinct clinical progression type. Ongoing trials are investigating the optimal sequencing and timing of therapies for mCRC. Molecular profi ling has established new targets, and increasing knowledge of tumour evolution under drug pressure will possibly impact on sequencing.]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 30, 2019

[Treatment of cholangiocellular carcinoma]

ANDRÁS Csilla, ÁRKOSY Péter

[Tumors of the biliary tract are a rare entity, at the time of diagnosis most of the patients are in advanced stage and operation can’t be effectuated. After operation the risk of recurrence is high. The standard adjuvant therapy is capecitabin based on the results of BILCAP study. In advanced stage or in the presence of metastates the standard fi rst line treatment is gemcitabine and cisplatin therapy, there are noninferiority results from a Japan study with gemcitabin and S1 combination therapy. There was no evidence of second line treatment possibilities after gemcitabine and cisplatin therapy until 2019, but based on the results of ABC-06 study mFOLFOX could be the choice in the future. In the case of MSI-H/dMMR tumors immuntherapy should be considered. Personalised medicine with matched molecular targeted therapy is a new option. There are 2 new molecular targets, FGFR and IDH, the preliminary result are very promising.]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 30, 2019

[Targeted and immune therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma: Predictions for 2019 and beyond]

MASATOSHI Kudo

[Systemic therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has markedly advanced since the survival benefi t of a molecular targeted agent, sorafenib, were demonstrated in the SHARP and Asia Pacifi c trials in 2007. Treatment options for patients with advanced HCC increased by sorafenib, and long-term survival for patients with advanced stage HCC has become possible to some extent. However, development of a more potent fi rst-line novel molecular targeted agent replacing sorafenib and a potent second-line agent after disease progression on or intolerant to sorafenib has been warranted because sorafenib lacks tumor shrinking/necrotizing effects and induces relatively severe adverse events such as hand foot skin reaction. Many agents in the 1st line and 2nd line setting were attempted to develop between 2007 and 2016, but all of these clinical trials failed. On the other hand, clinical trials of 4 agents (regorafenib, lenvatinib, cabozantinib, and ramucirumab) succeeded in succession in 2017 and 2018, and their use in clinical practice is possible (regorafenib and lenvatinib) or underway (cabozantinib and ramucirumab). Furthermore, all of 5 clinical trials of combination therapy with transcatheter chemoembolization (TACE) plus a molecular targeted agent failed to date, however, the combination of TACE and sorafenib (TACTICS trials) was reported to be successful and presented at ASCO in 2018. Phase 3 clinical trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors and a combination therapy of immune checkpoint inhibitors and molecular targeted agents are also ongoing, which suggests treatment paradigm of HCC in all stages from early, intermediate and advanced stage, is expected to be changed drastically in the very near future.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[New results of neuroscience research – the background of symptomatological and etiological diversity of mental disorders]

OSVÁTH Péter

[Nowadays, the focus of genetic, neurobiological, neuropsychological and psychosocial research is on a more accurate discovery of the etiology of mental illnesses, especially with regard to the role and complex interactions of certain risk factors. It is increasingly challenging to interpret the results of different aspects and methodologies in a coherent theoretical framework, as this can only lead to a more accurate understanding of the complexity and mechanism of the psychiatric disorders. The main aim of this paper to overview recent studies on etiological background of mental disorders and to present the most important aspects of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) system. Review of reports from comprehensive studies published in the most important psychiatric journals over the past five years summarizing new findings on the etio­logy of mental disorders. Although current classifications indicate that mental disorders are strictly distinct diagnostic categories, new findings suggest that these marked differences in symptomatic, genetic, and neurobiological backgrounds are not detectable, as many mental disorders have been identified as having common molecular genetic risk factors, which may indicate common neurobiological pathomechanisms. Research results support the need for a rethinking of psychiatric nosology on an etiological basis and represent an important step forward in the more accurate exploration of the neurobiological background factors of mental disorders and thus in the development of more targeted therapeutic approaches. The development of the RDoC system can be a great help in this, as this dimensional approach offers the possibility of integrating the - often diffuse or even contradictory - neuroscientific research findings into a unified theoretical framework for the etiology, nosology and treatment of mental disorders. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[The Comprehensive Aphasia Test in Hungarian]

ZAKARIÁS Lilla, RÓZSA Sándor, LUKÁCS Ágnes

[In this paper we present the Comprehensive Aphasia Test-Hungarian (CAT-H; Zakariás and Lukács, in preparation), an assessment tool newly adapted to Hungarian, currently under standardisation. The test is suitable for the assessment of an acquired language disorder, post-stroke aphasia. The aims of this paper are to present 1) the main characteristics of the test, its areas of application, and the process of the Hungarian adaptation and standardisation, 2) the first results from a sample of Hungarian people with aphasia and healthy controls. Ninety-nine people with aphasia, mostly with unilateral, left hemisphere stroke, and 19 neurologically intact control participants were administered the CAT-H. In addition, we developed a questionnaire assessing demographic and clinical information. The CAT-H consists of two parts, a Cognitive Screening Test and a Language Test. People with aphasia performed significantly worse than the control group in all language and almost all cognitive subtests of the CAT-H. Consistent with our expectations, the control group performed close to ceiling in all subtests, whereas people with aphasia exhibited great individual variability both in the language and the cognitive subtests. In addition, we found that age, time post-onset, and type of stroke were associated with cognitive and linguistic abilities measured by the CAT-H. Our results and our experiences clearly show that the CAT-H provides a comprehensive profile of a person’s impaired and intact language abilities and can be used to monitor language recovery as well as to screen for basic cognitive deficits in aphasia. We hope that the CAT-H will be a unique resource for rehabilitation professionals and aphasia researchers in aphasia assessment and diagnostics in Hungary. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

The applications of transcranial Doppler in ischemic stroke

FINNSDÓTTIR Herdis, SZEGEDI István, OLÁH László, CSIBA László

Background: This overview provides a summary of the applications of transcranial Doppler (TCD) in ischemic stroke. Results: A fast-track neurovascular ultrasound protocol has been developed for detecting occlusion or stenosis. The technique is more reliable in the carotid area than in the posterior circulation. By monitoring the pulsatility index the in­crea­sed intracranial pressure can be diagnosed. TIBI score was developed for grading residual flow. TCD has been shown to accurately predict complete or any recanalization. Regarding recanalization, TCD has a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 88%, a positive predictive value of 96%, a negative predictive value of 78% and an overall accuracy of 91%, respectively. Sonothrombolysis seemed to be a promising application but randomized controlled trials have shown that it does not improve clinical outcome. TCD examination can detect microembolic signals (MES) which are associated with an increased risk of stroke. Micro­em­boli were detected in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis and during carotid endarterectomy. The number of microemboli can be decreased by antithrombotic therapy. Contrast en­chan­ced examination and Valsalva maneuver with continuous TCD monitoring can accurately screen for right-to-left shunt.