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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

Review of electrode placement with the Slim Modiolar Electrode: identification and management

DIMAK Balazs, NAGY Roland, PERENYI Adam, JARABIN Andras Janos, SCHULCZ Rebeka, CSANÁDY Miklós, JÓRI József, ROVÓ László, KISS Geza Jozsef

Background - Several cochlear implant recipients experience functionality loss due to electrode array mal-positioning. The application of delicate perimodiolar electrodes has many electrophysiological advantages, however, these profiles may be more susceptible to tip fold-over. Purpose - The prompt realization of such complication following electrode insertion would be auspicious, thus the electrode could be possibly repositioned during the same surgical procedure. Methods - The authors present three tip fold-over cases, experienced throughout their work with Slim Modiolar Electrode implants. Implantations were performed through the round window approach, by a skilled surgeon. Standard intraoperative measurements (electric integrity, neural response telemetry, and electrical stapedial reflex threshold tests) were successfully completed. The electrode position was controlled by conventional radiography on the first postoperative day. Results - Tip fold-over was not tactilely sensated by the surgeon. Our subjects revealed normal intraoperative telemetry measurements, only the postoperative imaging showed the tip fold-over. Due to the emerging adverse perception of constant beeping noise, the device was replaced by a CI512 implant after 6 months in one case. In the two remaining cases, the electrode array was reloaded into a back-up sheath, and reinserted into the scala tympani successfully through an extended round window approach. Discussion - Future additional studies using the spread of excitation or electric field imaging may improve test reliability. As all of these measurements are still carried out following electrode insertion, real-time identification, unfortunately, remains questionable. Conclusion - Tip fold-over could be reliably identified by conventional X-ray imaging. By contrast, intraoperative electrophysiology was not sufficiently sensitive to reveal it.

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

Risk factors related to intracranial infections after transsphenoidal pituitary adenomectomy under endoscope

XU Yifan, HE Yuxin , XU Wu, LU Tianyu, LIANG Weibang, JIN Wei

Background – Up to now, the risk factors related to intracranial infections after transsphenoidal pituitary adenomectomy remain controversial. Purpose – To analyze the risk factors related to intracranial infections after transsphenoidal pituitary adenomectomy under an endoscope, and to provide evidence for preventing and controlling the occurrence and development of infections. A total of 370 patients receiving endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary adenomectomy in our hospital from January 2014 to October 2017 were selected. The risk factors related to postoperative intracranial infections were analyzed. The hospitalization lengths and expenditures of patients with and without intracranial infections were compared. Of the 370 patients, 18 underwent postoperative intracranial infections, with the infection rate of 4.86%. Intraoperative blood loss >120 mL, cerebrospinal leakage, diabetes, preoperative use of hormones, macroadenoma as well as surgical time >4 h all significantly increased the infection rate (P<0.05). Preoperative use of antibacterial agents prevented intracranial infection. Compared with patients without intracranial infections, the infected ones had significantly prolonged hospitalization length and increased expenditure (P<0.05). Discussion – It is of great clinical significance to analyze the risk factors related to intracranial infection after endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary adenomectomy, aiming to prevent and to control the onset and progression of infection. Intracranial infections after endoscopic transsphenoidal pituitary adenomectomy were affected by many risk factors, also influencing the prognosis of patients and the economic burden.

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2020

[Early experiences in surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniation from posterior transdural approach at Neurosurgery Clinic Szeged University]

MÁRKOS-GERGELY Gellérd, WATFA Kerim, BALÁZSFI Márton, SZEGETI Andrea, BARZÓ Pál

[Background – Because of the rare occurrence of thoracic disc herniation and surgery needed treatment the used approaches and their efficiency are still subjects of discussions. In Hungarian practice, the most frequent explorations are costotransversectomy and laminectomy, but there are many other important methods available like thoracoscopic and posterior transdural approaches. This case report will present the benefits and the surgical procedure of posterior transdural sequesterectomy, carry out for the first time in Hungary at the Neurosurgical Department on Szeged University. Case presentation – A 50-year-old female patient with achondroplasic nanism has been operated several times since 2011. She suffered from a progressive, multi-segment affected degenerative discopathy and myelopathy. Finally in the background of the recurrent paraparesis was confirmed thoracic disc herniations at the levels of T8 and T9. The use of intraoperative electrophysiology was not feasable, because the earlier described cervical myelopathy. For this reason we used the posterior transdural approach, as the best and safest, visual control warranted technique. Conclusions – The posterior transdural approach offers an alternative option for experienced surgeons, furthermore in contrast with traditional, technically difficult to implement or special instrumentation demanding approaches this technique seems to be more efficient.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

[The propagation and semiology of focal epileptic seizures. case presentations to the insula. theoretical considerations]

BALOGH Attila, BALOGH Attila ifj.

[Study objectives – The developing of diagnostical examinations in epileptology provides new challenges in seizure semiology. On the analysis of seizures it is important to examine the mechanisms of their propagation. The brain connectivity (based on the neuroimaging), the shadowing of the movement of excessive neuronal activity (based on computerized EEG and MEG methods), the cognition of the physiological and pathological brain networks are the foot- stone of the epileptic seizure propagation. The investigators prove, by means of case demonstrations of the role of the network nodes and the role of the epileptic hubs in the seizure symptomatology. Methods – The preoperative, intra and postoperative data are analised of three insular and one parietal epileptic patients in point of view of their seizure symptomes. Complex neuroimaging, noninvasive and invasive electrophysiology, intensive long-term video-EEG monitoring, computerized EEG analysis, fuctional mapping, intraoperative corticography were used. The etiology were confirmed with hystology. Results – It is observed that on seizure semiology our patients plays the insula a double role. In some cases, it is the focus of insular seizures with their symptoms difficult to identify. However, in the majority of cases and as a consequence of its rich neural connections, the insula has a peculiar property in the evolution of the symptomatogenic features of seizures. This observations are developing new relationships between the mechanism of seizure propagation and its semiological consequences. Conclusions – On epileptological point of view there are brain structures which has peculiar role in the „designe” of propagation of the epileptic excitement. The numerous new methods in neuroimaging and neurophysiology allowed the connectomical examination of the epileptic networks. The role of the epileptic diathesis is approachable with the metholdology of the brain connectivity. Theoretically the node of the epileptic network consist of the potential pathes where the localised excessive excitement can propagete. The route where the actual seizure can go adhead is determined by the actual edpileptic propensity of the above mentioned potential pathes.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

[Minimally invasive, extrapleural-anterolateral approach to the spine]

SZABÓ Viktor, BÜKI András, DÓCZI Tamás, SCHWARCZ Attila

[In spine surgery, minimally invasive approaches (MIS) are getting accepted and more popular worldwide during the last decades. It is due to the reduced intraoperative blood loss, decreased infection rate, less postoperative pain and earlier discharge from hospital compared to traditional approaches. The present paper puts forward a minimally invasive extrapleural approach to the thoracic spine that is not applied in Hungary. This new approach, in contrast to the standard costotransversectomy, provides direct visual control over the ventral surface of the dural sac. Furthermore, contrary to the transthoracic way, following minimally invasive extrapleural surgery thoracic drainage and intensive care are not necessary. The approach can be applied safely in treatment of ventral or ventrolateral pathologies of the thoracic spine. ]

Clinical Oncology

AUGUST 28, 2020

[Complex treatment of head and neck cancers – overview]

DÁNOS Kornél, TAMÁS László

[Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) is exceptionally complex, requiring the close cooperation of the head and neck surgeon, radiation oncologist and medical oncologist. Excellent tumor control should be our primary goal, however, the selection of treatment should not only be guided by oncologic radicality but by the need of satisfactory quality of life (as most local therapies affect respiratory, swallowing and/or speech function), too. Based on the appropriate diagnostic workup, these cancers are classifi ed into early, locoregionally advanced or recurrent/metastatic stages. Each category requires different treatment modalities, further complicated by the localization of the primary tumor and its metastases, performance status of the patient, comorbidities, and the biology of the lesion. In the present review, the authors summarize the basics of the therapy of head and neck cancers.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2020

Extraskeletal, intradural, non-metastatic Ewing’s sarcoma. Case report

OTTÓFFY Gábor, KOMÁROMY Hedvig

Intracranial localization of Ewing’s sarcoma is considerably very rare. Herein, we present clinical and neuroimaging findings regarding a 4-year-old boy with intracranial Ewing’s sarcoma. He was born prematurely, suffered intraventricular haemorrhage, posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus developed, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted in the newborn period. The patient endured re­gular follow ups, no signs of shunt malfunction nor increased intracranial pressure were observed. The last neuroima­ging examination was performed at 8 months of age. Upon reaching the age of 4 years, repeated vomiting and focal seizures began, and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure were detected. A brain MRI depicted a left frontoparietal space-occupying lesion infiltrating the superior sagittal sinus. The patient underwent a craniotomy resulting in the total excision of the tumour. The histological examination of the tissue revealed a small round blue cell tumour. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of EWSR1 gene translocation with FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). No additional metastases were detected during the staging examinations. The patient was treated in accordance to the EuroEwing 99 protocol. Today, ten years onward, the patient is tumour and seizure free and has a reasonably high quality of life.

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

Unanswered questions in the transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment of patients with depression

MORVAI Szabolcs, NAGY Attila, KOVÁCS Attila, MÓRÉ Csaba, BERECZ Roland, FRECSKA Ede

According to the WHO fact sheet depression is a common mental disorder affecting 350 million people of all ages worldwide. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique which allows the investigator to stimulate and study cortical functions in healthy subjects and patients suffering from various mental and neurological disorders. In the early 1990s, studies revealed that it is possible to evoke long term mood changes in healthy volunteers by rapid rate repetitive, TMS (rTMS) over the frontal cortex. Subsequent studies involving depressed patients found frontal cortical rTMS administered daily to be clinically effective. In the past two decades, numerous trials examined the therapeutic potential of rTMS application in the treatment of mood disorders with constantly evolving treatment protocols. The aim of this paper is to review the literature of the past two decades, focusing on trials addressing the efficacy and safety of rTMS in depressed patients. Our primary goal is to evaluate the results in order to direct future studies which may help investigators in the development of treatment protocols suitable in hospital settings. The time is not far when TMS devices will be used routinely by practitioners primarily for therapeutic purpose rather than clinical research. To our knowledge, a widely accepted “gold standard" that would offer the highest efficacy, with the best tolerability has not been established yet. In order to approach this goal, the most important factors to be addressed by further studies are: localization, frequency, intensity, concurrent medication, maintenance treatments, number of pulses, trains, unilateral, or bilateral mode of application.

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

[Correction of the physiological artefacts at pre-surgical clinical functional MR]

KISS Máté, GÁL Andor Viktor, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, MARTOS János, NAGY Zoltán

[Introduction/aim of the study - Pre-surgical functional MRI (fMRI) is an important modality of examinations before brain surgery. There are several artefacts (e.g. motion, susceptibility) which may hinder the evaluation of fMRI data. Physiological artefacts (breathing, pulsation) also affect the sensitivity and specificity of anatomical localization. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the efficiency of physiological artefact identification and removal methods for presurgical evaluation. Materials and methods - Siemens Magnetom Verio 3T MRI scanner was used to collect data. The physiological parameters (breathing, pulse) were recorded with the MRI system’s built-in devices. Data from fourteen patients - with primary brain tumour - were evaluated with SPM12 utilizing the RETROICOR/RVHR tool to detect and decrease the effect of physiological artefacts. We compared the statistical maps obtained with and without the physiological correction using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, and ROI analyses. Results - Significant differences were found in the mean ROI values (p<0.0016) and the extensions of eloquent activations (p<0.0013), when using the physiological correction (RETORICOR/RVHR) based on convolution method. On the other hand, no significant differences were found between the ROIs’ standard deviations (F=0.28). The RETROICOR/ RVHR method helps to define the precise localisation of eloquent areas (p<0.009). The number of irrelevant (non-significant) voxels were increased (p<0.001). Conclusions - Minimising of physiological artefacts in fMRI data calculations, the (RETROICOR/RVHR) method based on convolution has been successfully adapted. This algorithm could be helpful before neurosurgical intervention. The activity pattern became more reliable. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2019

[The red eye]

IMRE László

[Eye redness may be a sign of a variety of eye diseases with different severity. Most often redness is relatively harmless, such as conjunctivitis, but it can be a serious illness with visual impairment and even lasting consequences in the background of redness. It is therefore important for non-ophthalmologists to be informed and to know the basic types of redness of the eye and to recognize typical and characteristic forms of appearance. Based on these, they can decide whether the patient can be treated or forwarded to an ophthalmic institution. In the present continuing education article we try to summarize the causes of the red eye, primarily according to the characteristics of the redness of the eye and the anatomical localization. During the investigation of a patient with red eye, the type of the redness can be determined most by diffuse illumination and by naked eye inspection without any other means. It is important to know the principal features and causes of redness of conjunctival or ciliary or scleral origin, possible other recognizable differences (e.g. conjunctival papillae or follicles or conjunctival chemosis). We have attempted to illustrate these with a number of photographs, starting with a schematic representation of the characteristic features of redness. We tried to emphasize cases suitable for treating by non-ophthalmologists and tried to draw attention to the importance of referral un­clear or complicated cases.]