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Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2020

[Diseases with peripheral motor symptoms ]

DELI Gabriella, KOMÁROMY Hedvig, PÁL Endre, PFUND Zoltán

[Diseases with peripheral motor symptoms are a rare, but important subgroup of the all peripheral neuropathies, radiculopathies and neuronopathies. In these mostly progressive neuropathies, the clinical features include pure motor symptoms with weakness and wasting of the striated muscles. The differentiation of these diseases is frequently a challenge for qualified clinical neurologists. A careful history taking, the disease time course, the findings of routine clinical physical examination and the electrophysiological studies are all necessary in the diagnostic procedure. The aim of this publication is to overview the clinical characteristics of the pure motor peripheral neuropathies, to consider the diagnostic steps and the differential diagnosis, and finally to summarize the treatment options. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2019

Acute bilateral drop foot as a complication of prolonged squatting due to haemorrhoid

KOKSAL Ayhan, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye

Drop foot is defined as difficulty of dorsiflexion of the foot and ankle due to weak anterior tibial, extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Cauda equina syndrome, local peroneal nerve damage due to trauma, nerve entrapment, compartment syndrome and tumors are common etiologies. A 32-year-old male patient was applied with difficulty in dorsiflexion of both of his toes, feet and ankles after he had squatted in toilette for 6-7 hours (because of his haemorrhoid) after intense alcohol intake 2 weeks before. Acute, partial, demyelinating lesion in head of fibula segment of peroneal nerves was diagnosed by electromyography. This case was reported since prolonged squatting is an extremely rare cause of acute bilateral peroneal neuropathy. This type of neuropathy is mostly demyelination and has good prognosis with physical therapy and mechanical devices, but surgical intervention may be required due to axonal damage. People such as workers and farmers working in the squatting position for long hours should be advised to change their position as soon as the compression symptoms (numbness, tingling) appear.

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2019

[Severe polymyositis associated with multiplex pulmonary abscesses]

SZABÓ Katalin, VINCZE Anett, NAGY-VINCZE Melinda, DANKÓ Katalin, GRIGER Zoltán

[INTRODUCTION – Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are heterogeneous autoimmune diseases characterized by immune mediated inflammation of the skeletal muscles. CASE REPORT – A case of a 62-year-old male patient with severe proximal muscle weakness, elevated creatine kinase and swallowing difficulity is presented. Electromyography showed myogenic pattern, thus probable polymyositis was diagnosed. Radiological examination has confirmed bilateral multiplex lung lesions, which were caused by the possibility of tumor, tuberculosis, vasculitis and abscess as well. The condition of the patient deteriorated, nasogastric feeding, high dose steroid treatment was initiated, which reduced the patient's creatinine kinase values, but muscle strength was not changed. Based on the results of various investigations, the condition of the patient was finally confirmed by the development of myositis, resulting dysphagia, chronic aspiration, and multiplex lung abscess. Antibiotic therapy, steroid treatment was continued and finally intravenous immunoglobulin treatment was administered. The condition of the patient gradually improved, the swallowing dysfunction disappeared, and the lung abscesses were resolved. As a result of physiotherapy and rehabilitation treatment, the patient could walk again. CONCLUSIONS – Nasogastric feeding is recommended to prevent aspiration in the case of myositis-associated dysphagia. In case of steroid refractory therapy, the use of intravenous immunoglobulin may be effective. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2019

A case report of Morvan syndrome

AYTAC Emrah, ACAR Türkan

Morvan syndrome is a rare disease characterized by peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, encephalopathy, dys­autonomia and significant insomnia. The patient, who was included in the present study, was followed-up at our clinics for confusion, myokymia, hyperhidrosis, epileptic seizures, tachycardia, agitation, hypokalemia, and hyponatremia. The cranial MRI of the patient demonstrated hyperintensities at the T2 and FLAIR sections of the medial temporal lobe and insular lobes. Electromyography and neurotransmission examination results were concordant with peripheral nerve hyperreactivity. Contactin-associated protein-like 2 antibodies and leucine-rich glioma inactivated protein 1 antibodies were detected as positive. The patient was diagnosed with Morvan syndrome; intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroid treatment was started. Almost full remission was achieved. This very rare syndrome implies challenges in diagnosis and treatment; however, remission can be achieved during the follow-up. In addition, caution is needed in the long-term follow-up of these patients regarding the development of malignancies.

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2019

Axillary mononeuropathy after herpes zoster infection misdiagnosed as neuropathic pain

GÜL Sinem Sidika, AKARSU Oguz Emel

Zoster-associated extremity paresis is a rare complication of herpes zoster (HZ) and is usually due to zoster-associated mononeuropathy. Complaints of a 77-year-old man started with pain in his right arm and 4 days later he developed itchy red HZ lesions in the same area. One week later, the patient developed weakness in his right arm. The patient was diagnosed with isolated axillary mononeuropathy by physical examination and electromyography. Here, we present a case of axillary mononeuropathy which is a rare complication of HZ infection and needs particular attention.

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2018

Evaluation of symptom severity, functional status and anxiety levels in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome with different electrophysiological stages

SEVINC Gürses Eftal, TEKESIN Aysel, TUNC Abdulkadir

Objective - The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between electrophysiological stage, symptom severity, functional status and anxiety levels in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Materials and methods - This study included 130 patients in the 25-79 age group who were classified as clinically and electrophysiologically idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome in our electromyography (EMG) laboratory. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to assess pain during rest and activity. The Boston Carpal Tunnel Scale (BCTS) was used to evaluate symptom severity and functional status. Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) and Functional Capacity Scale (FCS) were assessed separately as a part of BCTS. Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) was used for anxiety assessment. Results - A total of 130 patients (25 males and 105 females) were enrolled to this prospective study. The mean age of the patients was 46.95 ± 10.57 years. When the electrophysiological stage was increased, it was found that SSS score and FCS score were increased (p <0.001). No significant correlation was detected between electrophysiological stage and VAS or BAI score. There was a positive correlation between VAS scores and SSS, FCS and BAI scores (p <0.001). Symptom severity and functional status were correlated with anxiety scores (p <0.001). SSS and FCS values of stage III and above patients were significantly higher than Stage I and II CTS patients (p <0.01). Conclusion - In conclusion, our study showed a significant correlation between symptom severity, functional status and anxiety in CTS patients. This can be interpreted as the mental deterioration of individuals with more severe symptoms. On the other hand, additional psychiatric support options should be recommended in cases of moderate findings but anxious symptoms. Electrophysiological findings shouldn’t be sufficient to measure the effect of the disease on the person.

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 10, 2004

[Myasthenia in a patient with sarcoidosis and schizophrenia (in English language)]

RÓZSA Csilla, KIS Gábor, KOMOLY Sámuel

[A 44-year-old male patient was hospitalised with paranoid schizophrenia in 1985. Depot neuroleptic treatment was started which successfully prevented further psychotic relapses for the next ten years. His myasthenia gravis started with bulbar signs in 1997 and the symptoms soon became generalized. The diagnosis of myasthenia gravis was confirmed by electromyography, by positive anticholinesterase test and by the detection of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in the serum. Mediastinal CT examination showed enlarged hilar lymph nodes on the left but no thymic pathology was observed. Mediastinoscopy was performed and biopsies were obtained from the affected nodes. Histology revealed sarcoidosis. The patient suffered respiratory crisis following the thoracic intervention (in September 1998). Combined oral corticosteroid (64 mg methylprednisolone/e.o.d.) and azathioprine (150 mg/day) treatment regimen was initiated and complete remission took place in both the myasthenic symptoms and the sarcoidosis. The follow-up CT scans showed no mediastinal pathology (January 2000). During steroid treatment a transient psychotic relapse occured which was successfully managed by supplemental haloperidol medication added to his regular depot neuroleptics. The patient currently takes 150 mg/day azathioprine and receives 40 mg/month flupentixol depot im. His physical and mental status are stable and he has been completely symptome free in the last 24 months. The association of myasthenia gravis and sarcoidosis is very rare. To our best knowledge no case has been reported of a patient suffering from myasthenia gravis, sarcoidosis, and schizophrenia at the same time.]

Hungarian Immunology

FEBRUARY 15, 2004

[Diagnostic value of MRI in patients with juvenile dermatomyositis]

CONSTANTIN Tamás, PONYI Andrea, BALÁZS György, SALLAI Ágnes, DANKÓ Katalin, FEKETE György, KARÁDI Zoltán

[Diagnosis of juvenile dermatomyositis is based on the presence of proximal muscle weakness, characteristic skin lesions, muscle enzyme elevation in the serum, and may requires the performance of invasive procedures such as electromyography and/or muscle biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered to be an objective non-invasive tool to detect muscle involvement for diagnosis as well as for follow-up studies. We report a case of a 12 years old girl with definitive juvenile dermatomyositis. She received glucocorticoid therapy and achieved remission of the disease. After a long-term relapse free period, she was presented with severe proximal muscle weakness and normal creatinine kinase levels. The laboratory studies did not reveal acute inflammation or infection. In this case MRI was diagnostic to the relapse of juvenile dermatomyositis, with an increased STIR (short tau inversion recovery) signal of proximal muscles. The muscle involvement detected by MRI correlated with functional ability. After she achieved clinical remission, further follow-up MRI scans demonstrated that the affected muscles had returned to normal signal intensity. Findings of dermatomyositis on MRI scans include increased signal intensity in the affected muscles, perimuscular edema, chemical-shift artifact, and increased signal intensity in subcutaneous tissue. MRI is a sensitive technique and proposed to be a good indicator for an early diagnosis of the disease. MRI may also help to guide the muscle biopsy and may enhance the sensitivity of histological examination. After completion of therapy, MRI may be used for monitoring the progress of the disease as signal intensity of affected muscles returns to normal. MRI is also helpful, if the diagnosis is suspected but has not been formally evaluated.]

Clinical Neuroscience

DECEMBER 20, 2003

[Assessment of motor impairment with electromyography - the kinesiological EMG]

HORVÁTH Mónika, FAZEKAS Gábor

[Kinesiological electromyography means the application of the surface EMG measurement technique during movement and locomotion. The authors investigated the motor impairments of the upper limb of patients with spastic hemiparesis. Surface EMG activity in musculus biceps brachii and musculus triceps brachii were recorded during voluntary elbow flexion and extension movements. In some cases even the raw EMG signals contain the accurate information but more often the recorded signals should further be processed to achieve more valuable data concerning muscle performance. The limitations of the technique underlines the importance of the several steps of the processing. The purpose of this study is to present a systematic description of the methods and the precise application of surface EMG. The authors give a comprehensive view of different processing methods and demonstrate the application areas of the kinesiological EMG.]

Clinical Neuroscience

OCTOBER 20, 2002

[Kennedy’s syndrome - bulbo-spinal muscular atrophy]

SZABÓ Antal, MECHLER Ferenc

[Kennedy syndrome is a late-onset, bulbar-spinal type of muscular atrophy, with X-linked recessive inheritance. The characteristic features of the disease become prominent in the 4-5th decades: proximal muscle wasting and weakness, bulbar signs, fasciculations in skeletal muscles, subtle signs of endocrine dysfunction, such as gynaecomastia or testicular atrophy. The electrophysiological examinations are the keypoint to the diagnosis. Electroneurography shows normal conduction velocity in peripheral nerves, but the sensory nerves usually show axonal degeneration, which causes only very mild or subclinical neurological deficits. Electromyography shows chronic anterior horn cell degeneration in skeletal muscles. Molecular genetic diagnosis was introduced in 1991, when an abnormal expansion of CAG repeat was found in the first exon of the androgen receptor gene on chromosome X with a frequency of 100% in the affected population. Since the progression is very slow and these patients can expect a normal life span, it is essential to distinguish this syndrome from other, often more severe diseases, such as ALS. There is no proven therapy for Kennedy's disease yet. This is the first case of Kennedy's disease published in Hungary.]