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Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2020

[Recurrent inhibition during Jendrassik maneuver]

LUKÁCS Miklós

[Objective – Conflicting theoretical models exist regarding the mechanism related to the ability of the Jendrassik maneuver to reinforce reflex parameters. Our objective was to investigate if vigorous handgrip would induce changes in recurrent inhibition of soleus motoneurons. Method – Soleus H reflex was evoked by stimulating the tibial nerve at rest and during bilateral vigorous handgrip, alternating single (H1) and paired stimulation (H2). At paired stimulation we used interstimulus intervals of 10, 15, 20 and 25 ms and supramaximal test stimulus. H1- and H2-wave amplitudes were expressed as percentage of maximal M-wave amplitude. Conditioned H2 wave maximal (H2max) and minimal (H2) amplitudes evoked at rest and expressed as a percentage of the unconditioned H1max amplitude were compared with the corresponding values obtained during handgrip by means of paired Student test and Bonferroni correction. Subjects – At the study participated 28 healthy volunteers. Results – The H1max/Mmax × 100 values obtained during handgrip (37.5±10.1) were significantly higher than those obtained at rest (27.1±7.4). The H2max/H1max × 100-va­lues obtained at paired stimulation were significantly higher during handgrip than at rest, while no significant diffe­rence was found between the H2/H1max × 100-values obtained during handgrip and at rest respectively. Discussion – The H2max/H1max is determined by both the excitability of the motoneurons and the recurrent inhibition elicited by the conditioning stimulus, while H2/H1max indicates only the level of recurrent inhibition. According to our results the Renshaw cells retain their inhibitory effect on the soleus alpha motoneurons during remote muscle contraction. Conclusion – Soleus H reflex enhancement during Jendrassik maneuver is not due to decrease of recurrent inhibition. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2020

The etiology and age-related properties of patients with delirium in coronary intensive care unit and its effects on inhospital and follow up prognosis

ALTAY Servet, GÜRDOGAN Muhammet, KAYA Caglar, KARDAS Fatih, ZEYBEY Utku, CAKIR Burcu, EBIK Mustafa, DEMIR Melik

Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 18, 2020

[Interrelations between antidepressants and diabetes]

HARGITTAY Csenge, GONDA Xénia, MÁRKUS Bernadett, VÖRÖS Krisztián, TABÁK Gy. Ádám, KALABAY László, RIHMER Zoltán, TORZSA Péter

[Diabetes and depression are frequent comorbidities. They are a heavy burden by themselves, however, as comorbidities increase additionally the number of diabetes-related complications, morbidity, and mortality. In the background of interrelations, there are both well-known and hypothetical mechanisms. The aim of the present review is to outline these interrelations between antidepressants and diabetes and to discuss the effect of medications on carbohydrate metabolism respectively. Anti­depressant treatment on the one hand may improve mood, cognitive function and medication adherence leading to an improved glucose metabolism, on the other hand through their metabolic side effects, they may worsen carbohydrate metabolism. Concerning metabolic side effects, selec­tive serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the sa­fest, while tricyclic antidepressants and mo­noamine oxidase inhibitors should be administered under close monitoring. Se­rotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors may deteriorate gly­cae­mic control via increased noradre­nergic activation. Novel antidepressants, how­ever, have a neutral or positive impact on gly­caemic measures. Screening for and temporally adjusted treatment of depres­sion may decrease the risk of comorbidities ge­nerated complications. While caring for diabetic patients with depression, one should consider metabolic side effects of antidepressants and close monitoring of carbohydrate metabolism.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

[The therapeutic use of transcranial magnetic stimulation in major depression]

NÉMETH Viola Luca, CSIFCSÁK Gábor, KINCSES Zsigmond Tamás, JANKA Zoltán, MUST Anita

[The antidepressive effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been investigated for almost 20 years now. Several studies have been published aiming to identify the exact and reliable parameters leading to the desired therapeutic effect. However, the related literature shows great variability. The current overview aims to provide a comprehensive overview of factors associated with the therapeutic effect of rTMS in major depression. High frequency stimulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) for 3-6 weeks leads to mood improvement comparable to the effect of antidepressive medications in 35-40% of patients. Pharmacotherapy resistant patients treated with rTMS reach remission for 3 months on average. Low frequency stimulation of the right DLPFC appears to be similarly effective, though much less investigated so far. In addition to the exact delineation of the stimulation area, treatment outcome is also related to stimulation intensity as well as the number of sessions and impulses. Considering the safety and tolerability aspects of rTMS, it might be a significant therapeutic support for therapy resistant patients. Above this, patients diagnosed with major depression might benefit from the additional positive influence of rTMS improving the effect of antidepressive medication. Based on converging research evidence, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) agency approved the use of rTMS as a treatment option for therapy resistant major depression in 2008. So far, in Hungary rTMS is primarily considered as a promising tool in research settings only. Hopefully, patients suffering from major depression will increasingly benefit from the positive therapeutic effect of this intervention.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

The electrophysiological changes after 1 hz RTMS in ALS patients. A pilot study

MAJOR Zsigmond Zoltán, VACARAS Vitalie, MARIS Emilia, CRISAN Ioana, FLOREA Bogdan, MAJOR Andrea Kinga, MURESANU Fior Dafin

Motor neuron diseases are disabling poor prognostic conditions, with no successful treatment. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation might offer a temporary functional improvement. Objective - We intended to evaluate the extent of the functional improvement using electrophysiological and clinical tests. Methods - Patients with motor neuron disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) were included. Muscle strength and respiratory function assessment represents the clinical approach, and central motor conduction time, motor unit number estimation, blink reflex and H-reflex stands for electrophysiology. Two tests were performed using the whole battery prior and after low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, using 1 Hz stimulation frequency for five consecutive days, 20 minutes daily, at 80% of the individual resting motor threshold. Results - Central motor conduction time, muscle strength and pulmonary function showed no statistically significant differences, but a tendency towards improvement. Motor unit number estimation, blink reflex and H-reflex showed a significantly better outcome after the five day repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment. Conclusion - Low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation influences beneficially electrophysiological parameters in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but with little clinical impact; further studies are needed to validate the extent of the effect.

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[Sleep disordered breathing and epilepsy: relationships and therapeutic considerations]

FALUDI Béla, BÓNÉ Beáta, KOMOLY Sámuel, JANSZKY József

[The importance of the sleep related breathing disorders (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, central sleep apnea, and Cheyne-Stokes breathing) in the pathophysiology crebro- and cardiovascular disorders is well known. The relationship of sleep related breathing abnormalities and epilepsy is also important but underestimated in the daily practice. The relation is bidirectional. The breathing abnormalities in sleep may play important role in generating epileptic seizure, but the adverse effect of seizure and antiepileptic therapy (generation of apneas and hypopneas) may worsen the seizure control. The effect of new therapies (vagal nerve and deep brain stimulation) on the sleep architecture and sleep disordered breathing must be examined and discussed. Here we present a brief case of epileptic patient with deep brain stimulation therapy on sleep as well. The examination of the sleep related breathing abnormalities in epilepsy patient may help improve the effectiveness of antiepileptic therapy.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

AUGUST 30, 2019

[The effect of an alternative training method on the pelvic floor muscle]

ARANYNÉ Molnár Tímea, SZABÓ Kinga, RÁZSÓ Katalin, DOMJÁN Andrea, SZŰCS Mónika, SURÁNYI Andrea, BÓDIS József

[Aim: In our study we analysed an alternative training method alone or in combination with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) with deep abdominal muscle strengthen the PFM better. Material and Methods: The study was conducted on women (n=5, mean age ±SD: 51,8 years, ±9,23 years). The Callanetics® gymnastics consisted of training sessions of 2x1 hours (10 weeks only Callanetics® exercises, 10 weeks in combined with PFM contractions). The subjects completed a questionnaire (risk factors, symptoms) and to measure the body parts’ circumference at 0. and 20. weeks. The measurement of the conditional capacitance of the PFM was performed by EMG before the gymnastics, then at weeks 10 and 20. We used R Statistics Software. Results: Significant decreseing were observed in the circumference of extremities and on isometric contraction improves (p=0.036). The dynamic strength showed an increasing tendency. Conclusion: The alternative training method significantly increased the maximum contractions of the PFM.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

AUGUST 30, 2019

[The effect of whole body electrostimulation for the pelvic floor muscles ]

ARANYNÉ Molnár Tímea, NAGY Edit, DOMJÁN Andrea, FEKETE Zoltán, SURÁNYI Andrea, BÓDIS József

[The aim of the study: Few studies research the effects of trunk stabilizer muscle strengthening on pelvic floor dysfunctions. We assessed a new core strengthening method on the pelvic floor muscles. Material and method: Female patient (70 years) with stressincontinence and low back pain received the Whole Body Electric Muscle Stimulation for 10 weeks (2x25 minutes/week). The EMG (for the conditioning ability of pelvic floor muscle such as maximal isometric contraction, dynamic endurance and relaxation values), urodynamic assessment, introitus and the transabdominal ultrasound were used before and after training. Results: The patient’s the stressincontinence, low back pain and the conditioning ability of pelvic floor muscles improved. The urodynamic and ultrasounds values showed improvement in functions of the bladder neck and deep abdominal muscle. Conclusion: This method would increase the trunk stabilization and pelvic floor muscle strength of the eldery age group, which might decrease the prevalence of urinary incontinence.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

[Correction of the physiological artefacts at pre-surgical clinical functional MR]

KISS Máté, GÁL Andor Viktor, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, MARTOS János, NAGY Zoltán

[Introduction/aim of the study - Pre-surgical functional MRI (fMRI) is an important modality of examinations before brain surgery. There are several artefacts (e.g. motion, susceptibility) which may hinder the evaluation of fMRI data. Physiological artefacts (breathing, pulsation) also affect the sensitivity and specificity of anatomical localization. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the efficiency of physiological artefact identification and removal methods for presurgical evaluation. Materials and methods - Siemens Magnetom Verio 3T MRI scanner was used to collect data. The physiological parameters (breathing, pulse) were recorded with the MRI system’s built-in devices. Data from fourteen patients - with primary brain tumour - were evaluated with SPM12 utilizing the RETROICOR/RVHR tool to detect and decrease the effect of physiological artefacts. We compared the statistical maps obtained with and without the physiological correction using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, and ROI analyses. Results - Significant differences were found in the mean ROI values (p<0.0016) and the extensions of eloquent activations (p<0.0013), when using the physiological correction (RETORICOR/RVHR) based on convolution method. On the other hand, no significant differences were found between the ROIs’ standard deviations (F=0.28). The RETROICOR/ RVHR method helps to define the precise localisation of eloquent areas (p<0.009). The number of irrelevant (non-significant) voxels were increased (p<0.001). Conclusions - Minimising of physiological artefacts in fMRI data calculations, the (RETROICOR/RVHR) method based on convolution has been successfully adapted. This algorithm could be helpful before neurosurgical intervention. The activity pattern became more reliable. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

Neurocognitive functions in patients with hepatitis C infection

HORVÁTH Gergely, KELETI Teodóra, MAKARA Mihály, UNGVARI S Gabor, GAZDAG Gábor

Background - With improving treatment options, more attention is being paid to the neurocognitive symptoms related to hepatitis C infection (HCI). While HCI-related neurocognitive impairments are frequently subclinical, they can influence patients’ quality of life and fitness to work. Objective - The aim of this study was to assess HCI patients’ neurocognitive functions and explore the correlations between disease variables and neurocognitive symptoms. Method - The study was conducted between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2015. All patients with HCI were included in the study who were registered at the Hepatology Outpatient Clinic of Szent István and Szent László Hospitals, met inclusion criteria and volunteered to participate. Patients’ sociodemographic data and medical history were recorded in a questionnaire designed for the study. The 21-item Beck Depression Inventory was used to detect depressive symptoms. Six computerized tests were used to evaluate patients’ neuropsychological functions. Results - Sixty patients participated in the study. In comparison with general population standards, patients demonstrated poorer performance in several neurocognitive tests. Neuropsychological performance was correlated with age, sex, length of time since HCI diagnosis, Fibroscan score and the number of previous antiviral treatments. Conclusions - The study’s main finding is that compared to general population standards, patients with hepatitis C virus-related disease exhibit impaired neuropsychological functioning in visuomotor and visuospatial functions, working memory, executive functions, and reaction time. Executive functions and reaction time were the most sensitive indicators for the length and severity of disease. Deterioration in these functions has a major negative effect on work performance particularly in certain occupations.