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Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Possibilities and limitations. Dietary difficulties of chronic renal failure in childhood]

REUSZ György, SZABÓ Adrienn

[In chronic kidney disease (CKD), the role of the kidney in assuring homeostasis is gradually deteriorating. Besides fluid, electrolyte and hormonal disturbances, detoxification and control of blood pressure is insufficient without external help. In children, in addition to achieving equilibrium it is also essential to ensure optimal physical and cognitive/psychological development. Adequate calorie intake is a major determinant of growth during infancy. Among the therapeutic options it is essential to ensure a proper diet. In addition to reflecting the special needs of renal failure in its composition, it must be palatable for the child. Children with kidney disease should have a normal energy diet. Protein intake should not be reduced from the baseline recommendation, but lower phosphorus and high bioavailability should be preferred. A low sodium and potassium diet is recommended for a significant proportion of patients and is based on dietary advice. Further, diet planning may be problematic if the child has special dietary requirements and is in need of nasogastric tube feeding. Because diet planning is a complex task, it is difficult to achieve optimal protein supply and mineral restriction along with high energy intake. In such cases, enteral nutrition with special formulas/ drinks developed for pediatric nutrition may provide a solution.]

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Molecular subtypes and the evolution of treatment decisions in metastatic colorectal cancer]

RODRIGO Dienstmann, RAMON Salazar, JOSEP Tabernero

[Colorectal cancer (CRC) has clinically-relevant molecular heterogeneity at multiple levels: genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics and microenvironment features. Genomic events acquired during carcinogenesis remain drivers of cancer progression in the metastatic setting. For example, KRAS and NRAS mutations defi ne a population refractory to EGFR monoclonal antibodies, BRAFV600E mutations associate with poor outcome under standard therapies and response to targeted inhibitors in combinations, while HER2 amplifi cations confer unique sensitivity to double HER2 blockade. Multiple rare gene alterations driving resistance to EGFR monoclonal antibodies have been described with signifi cant overlap in primary and acquired mechanisms, in line with a clonal selection process. In this context, sequential analysis of circulating tumor DNA has the potential to guide drug development in a treatment refractory setting. Rare kinase fusion events and complex alterations in genes involved in DNA damage repair have been described, with emerging evidence for targetability. On the other hand, transcriptomic subtypes and pathway activation signatures have also shown prognostic and potential predictive value in metastatic CRC. These markers refl ect stromal and immune microenvironment interactions with cancer cells. For example, the microsatellite instable (MSI) or POLE ultramutant CRC population is particularly sensitive to immune checkpoint inhibitors, while tumors with a mesenchymal phenotype are characterized by activation of immunosuppressive molecules that mandate stratifi ed development of novel immunotherapy combinations. In this manuscript we review the expanding landscape of targetable oncogenic alterations and signatures in metastatic CRC and discuss the clinical implementation of novel molecular diagnostic tests.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018

[Differential diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia]

NÉMETH Zsófia, DEÁK György

[Hyponatraemia (serum sodium concentration < 136 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality that inceases the risk of both in-hospital, and outpatient mortality. Antidiuretic hormone action or low glomerular fitration rate or low excretable osmoles or their combination are involved in its pathogenesis. Differential diagnosis is based on medical and medication histories, serum- and urine osmolality and urine sodium concentration. Measurement of fractional excretions of urea and uric acid help identifying low effective circulting volume, renal hypoperfusion. Symptomatic hyponatraemia or an acute decrease of serum sodium concentration exceeding 10 mmol/l should be treated with 3% NaCl to avoid impending threat to life. The principles of the treatment of chronic hyponatraemia are restriction of water intake and elimination of etiologic factor(s) (eg. medications - most often thiazides). In case of contracted axtracellular volume, isotonic saline should be given. In case of euvolaemia, restriciton of water intake is fundamental. In case of expanded extracellular volume, (heart failure, liver cirrhosis, nephrosis), water and NaCl intake should be restricted along with aldosteron antagonist and loop diuretic therapy. In chronic hyponatraemia, the rise of serum sodium concentration should not exceed 10 mmol/l during the first 24 hours and 8 mmol/l/day thereafter. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 14, 2018

[Role of ketoanalogue amino acids and diet in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease]

KISS István, HARIS Ágnes, DEÁK György

[Low protein diet is an important component of the non-pharmacological treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Along with the diet it is important to maintain appropriate energy intake to avoid malnutrition. It is recommended to supplement low protein diet (0.6-0.7 g protein/kg body weight/day) with essential amino acids and their ketoanalogues (ketoacids) in a dose of 1 tablet/8-10 kg body weight if there is a threat of protein malnutrition (eg. vegan diet). Very low protein diet (0.3-0.4 g protein/kg body weight/day) should be supplemented with ketoacids in a dose of 1 tablet/5 kg body weight. Low protein diet is recommended for patients with CKD stage 3 and progressively declining renal function, or nephrotic syndrome; in diabetic nephropathy; in CKD stage 4 and non-dialyzed CKD stage 5. Nephroprotective effect of very low protein diet is primarily expected is patients with an eGFR below 20-25 ml/min/1.73 m2 and good compliance. Dietary protein restriction may diminish acidosis and proteinuria, slow the progression of CKD and delay initiation of dialysis. Diets reduced in protein supplemented with appropriate energy intake and ketoacids are nutritionally safe. Dietary education and guidance of patients by qualified dietitians are of great importance in nephrology clinics. We illustrate the main points of our review with case reports.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 20, 2018

[Dietary treatment of dialysis patients]

ZAKAR Gábor

[Adequate nutritional indices and intake are the corner stone of long term success of renal replecement therapies (hemo- and peritoneal dialysis, transplantation) characterized by favourable survial rates and a good quality of life. There has been no major change in basic principles of nutritional prescription (protein, energy, fluid intake, restriction of sodium, potassium and phosphorous), increasing emphasis has been placed on the reduction of calcium load and ”native” vitamin-D therapy in these patients. Less avareness has been put however in the past ten years (according to recent metaanalyses) on the role and replacement of the full scale of vitamins, in spite of their occasionally altered metabolism and replacement-requirements in ESRD patients. Usually there is a need for their replacement, but some of them are represented in abundant, sometimes toxic amounts in commercially available multivitamin preparates. With in the scope of general aspects of nutrition in ESRD patients, the article gives a detalied overview of their multivitamin recommendations and alternatives of a specified substition.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2018

A case with angiographic demonstration of isolated anterior spinal artery occlusion

DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, KARA Batuhan, SELCUK Hatem Hakan, DIRICAN Ceyhan Ayten, KOKSAL Ayhan

Anterior spinal artery syndrome (ASAS) is a rare syndrome which occurs due to thrombosis of anterior spinal artery (ASA) which supplies anterior two thirds of the spinal cord. A 27-year-old female patient was admitted to emergency clinic with sudden onset neck pain, sensory loss and weakness in proximal upper extremities which occurred at rest. Thrombophilia assessment tests were negative. Echocardiography was normal. Serum viral markers were negative. In cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination, cell count and biochemistry was normal, oligoclonal band was negative, viral markers for herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-1 and type-2, Brucella, Borrellia, Treponema pallidum, Tuberculosis were negative. Diffusion restriction which reveals acute ischemia was detected in Diffusion weighted MRI. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed. Medical treatment was 300mg/day acetilsalycilic acid. Patient was discharged from neurology clinics to receive rehabilitation against spasticity.

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 10, 2017

[The role of PET in clinical oncology]

LENGYEL Zsolt

[Positron emission tomography (PET) has earned an important role in clinical imaging, where it is used almost exclusively as hybrid modality such as PET/CT and PET/MR. The driving force behind the development of the method and the increasing clinical penetration of PET in the past two decades was clearly its use in Oncology. The most used tracer in PET is the 18 F-labeled fl uoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG). With the help of this molecule malignant tumors and their metastases, in which anaerobic glycolysis is typically increased, can be identifi ed with high sensitivity in the total body volume. However, FDG is not a tumor specifi c tracer, thus both false positivity and false negativity may occure which reduces the diagnostic accuracy. Indications of FDG PET studies in Oncology continuously evolved, owing to scientifi c publications, large scale national programs and even health-economic considerations. This publication describes the well-established indications of FDG PET/CT(MR) tests in cancer diagnostics and furthermore discusses more recent new PET tracers already being applied as well as those expected to be used in the future.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

FEBRUARY 28, 2017

[Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: how we screen and diagnose?]

ANNUS János, CSATLÓS Dalma, SZAKÁCS ZOLTÁN

[The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is known to cause obstructive apneas and hypopneas mostly with desaturations and/or arousals caused by repetitive collapse of the upper airway system during sleep. The disorder negatively affects sleep efficacy and daytime neurocognitive functions as well as increases cardiovascular risks. The typical clinical presentation is excessive daytime sleepiness and loud snoring interrupted by brief pauses of breathing. Its prevalence is 2-4% in the general population. It may be a causative factor in some disorders such as therapy resistant hypertension, nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias, stroke, cognitive decline or depression. Significance of the disorder is highlighted by the fact that its risk must be evaluated by the family doctors during the examination of medical suitability for driving licence in Hungary. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2017

[A családorvosok alvási apnoéval kapcsolatos ismeretei és attitűdjei. Megvalósul-e az OSAS szűrése a járművezetők egészségi alkalmasságának vizsgálata során?]

CSATLÓS Dalma, FERENCI Tamás, KALABAY László, LÁSZLÓ Andrea, HARGITTAY Csenge, MÁRKUS Bernadett, SZAKÁCS ZOLTÁN, TORZSA Péter

[Objective - Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) without treatment can cause serious cardiovascular, cardiorespiratory, neurological and other complications. Family physicians have an important role in recognizing the disease. The aim of the study is to assess the knowledge and attitude of family physicians related to sleep apnea. Whether OSAS screening is realized during the general medical checkup for drivers. Methods - In the cross-sectional study we used a validated OSAKA questionnaire in mandatory continuous medical education courses, supplemented with four additional questions. Results - 116 family physicians and 103 family medicine residents filled out the questionnaire. Hungarian family physicians, especially male doctors lack the adequate knowledge of sleep apnea. The average score of female physicians was significantly higher than that of males (13.4±1.8 vs. 11.7±2.6, p=0.005). The more sprecializations the doctor has, the higher the score. Zero or one special examination holders reached 12.5±2.3 points, two special examination holders 12.7±2.2 points. three or four special examination holders reached 14.0±2.1 (p=0.05). Residents’ average score was 12.1±2.4 points, which is higher than that of family doctors (p=0.012). Female residents also had higher average points than male residents (12.6±2.0 vs. 11.3±2.7; p=0.008). The size, location and type of the practice or the doctor’s age did not show any statistically significant correlation with the number of points achieved. According to our regression analysis, corrected to variables in the model, we found correlation between gender and medical knowledge, but there was no correlation between age, number of specialities, body mass index and the theoretical knowledge of the doctors. In terms of attitude female GPs had higher average scores than male GPs (3.5±0.6 vs. 2.9±0.6, p<0.001). Despite the modification of the 13/1992 regulation only 39% of the practices carried out regularly the required OSAS screening as part of the medical examination for a driving licence. Conclusions - Despite the high prevalence and clinical importance of OSAS, GPs often do not recognize sleep apnea and they have difficulty in treating their patients for this problem.]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 10, 2016

[Hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy]

MATOLTSY András

[Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is defined as an increase in the mass of the left ventricle. In addition to the absolute increase in mass, the geometric pattern of LVH also may be important. LVH can be secondary to an increase in wall thickness, an increase in cavity size, or both. LVH as a consequence of hypertension usually presents with an increase in wall thickness. This increase in mass predominantly results from a chronic increase in afterload of LV caused by the hypertension, although there is also a genetic component. A significant increase in the number and/or size of sarcomeres is the main pathologic mechanism, but hypertension may also result in interstitial fibrosis. The estimation of mass is commonly derived from measurements obtained by echocardiography. LVH is associated with increased incidence of systolic and/or diastolic dysfunction, heart failure, myocardial infarction, ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, aortic root dilatation, and a cerebrovascular event. The cardiovascular risk is directly related to the degree of mass. The regression of LVH is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular risk and improved cardiac function. Regression of LVH is associated with weight loss, dietary sodium restriction, and use of ACE inhibitors, ARBs, some calcium channel blockers, and some sympatholytic agents.]