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Clinical Neuroscience

JUNE 20, 2003

[Asymptomatic ischemic cerebrovascular disorders and neuroprotection with vinpocetine]

HADJIEV Dimiter

[The asymptomatic ischemic cerebrovascular disorders (AICVD) is an early manifestation of cerebrovascular disease. It is also known as latent insufficiency of the cerebrovascular circulation or as asymptomatic cerebrovascular disorders. Recently, the term subclinical disease, detected noninvasively, has been introduced by American Heart Association. The diagnosis is based on the following criteria: evidence of vascular risk factors; episodic nonspecific complaints without any focal cerebral symptoms; mild cognitive deficit, detected by neuropsychological tests; carotid ultrasonography often shows intimal-medial thickening, atherosclerotic plaques and carotid stenosis; CT and MRI occasionally reveal silent cerebral infarctions, white matter hyperintensities or cerebral atrophy; regional hypoperfusion above the ischemic threshold is also seen by rCBF measurements. Treatment of the AICVD, modifying the vascular risk factors and using neuroprotective agents, should be the cornerstone of primary prevention of ischemic stroke and cognitive decline, caused by cerebrovascular disorders. Vinpocetine has been found to interfere with various stages of the ischemic cascade: ATP depletion, activation of voltagesensitive Na+- and Ca++-channels, glutamate and free radicals release. The inhibition of the voltage-sensitive Na+- channels appears to be especially relevant to the neuroprotective effect of vinpocetine. Pronounced antioxidant activity of the drug could also contribute to the neuroprotection. PET studies in primates and man showed that 11C labelled vinpocetine passes the blood-brain barrier rapidly. Heterogeneous brain distribution of the compound was observed mainly in the thalamus, basal ganglia, occipital, parietal and temporal cortex, regions which are closely related to the cognitive functions. PET studies in chronic ischemic stroke patients revealed favourable effects of vinpocetine on rCBF and glucose metabolism in the thalamus, basal ganglia and primary visual cortex. It seems, vinpocetine, affecting the multiple mechanisms of the AICVD, could be of benefit for the treatment in this early stage of cerebrovascular disease. Vinpocetine may also become a new therapeutic approach to prophylactic neuroprotection in patients at high risk of ischemic stroke.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 20, 2005

[CALPAIN-3 GENE DEFECT CAUSING LIMB GIRD MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY IN A HUNGARIAN FAMILY]

HORVÁTH Rita, WALTER C. Maggie, LOCHMÜLLER Hanns, HÜBNER Angela, KARCAGI Veronika, PIKÓ Henriett, TÍMÁR László, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Limb gird muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary diseases with autosomal recessive trait, characterized by progressive atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limb muscles. The authors present clinical, histological, immunohistochemical and immunoblot results of two sisters suffering from so far unclassified autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Haplotype analysis for genes possibly involved in autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies was performed in the genetically informative family. All of the results pointed to a molecular genetic defect of the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. Direct sequencing of the CAPN3 gene revealed compound hetereozygous state for two mutations previously described in association with limb girdle muscular dystrophy, proving pathogenity. The authors would like to emphasize the importance of the above described combined strategy in diagnosing limb girdle muscular dystrophies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

OCTOBER 20, 2002

[Kennedy’s syndrome - bulbo-spinal muscular atrophy]

SZABÓ Antal, MECHLER Ferenc

[Kennedy syndrome is a late-onset, bulbar-spinal type of muscular atrophy, with X-linked recessive inheritance. The characteristic features of the disease become prominent in the 4-5th decades: proximal muscle wasting and weakness, bulbar signs, fasciculations in skeletal muscles, subtle signs of endocrine dysfunction, such as gynaecomastia or testicular atrophy. The electrophysiological examinations are the keypoint to the diagnosis. Electroneurography shows normal conduction velocity in peripheral nerves, but the sensory nerves usually show axonal degeneration, which causes only very mild or subclinical neurological deficits. Electromyography shows chronic anterior horn cell degeneration in skeletal muscles. Molecular genetic diagnosis was introduced in 1991, when an abnormal expansion of CAG repeat was found in the first exon of the androgen receptor gene on chromosome X with a frequency of 100% in the affected population. Since the progression is very slow and these patients can expect a normal life span, it is essential to distinguish this syndrome from other, often more severe diseases, such as ALS. There is no proven therapy for Kennedy's disease yet. This is the first case of Kennedy's disease published in Hungary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2007

[A CASE OF FRONTOTEMPORAL LOBAR DEGENERATION WITH UBIQUITIN-POSITIVE INTRANEURONAL INCLUSIONS]

LEEL-ŐSSY Lóránt, RÉVÉSZ Tamás, ALMÁSI Kálmán, SZŰCS Iván, SZABÓ Éva

[The case of a 57 year-old-man is reported who has been treated several times because of his relatively expedite mental decline which has begun four years before his death. His first complaints were forgetfulness, mild changes in his behaviour, confusion and difficulty in speech. The neuropsychiatric examinations displayed a mild difficulty in naming and sometimes comprehension of words, although his speech was gramatically correct. Furthermore the patient presented a very severe decrease in short term memory with dementia and confusion. These symptomes together with the results of CT and test examinations established the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Finally pneumonia afflicted the patient during the last hospitalization and he died. Histopathological examinations of the brain showed a severe, mainly temporofrontal atrophy caused by an extensive cortical neuronal loss and gliosis without neurofibrillar degenerations and senile plaques which characterize the Alzheimer's disease. Tau-positivity Pick- and Lewy-bodies may not be found. The loss of neurons associated in some places with spongiosity of laminar form. The ubiquitine-positive intracytoplasmic inclusions proved to be the most characteristic feature in the swollen neurons. These mainly occurred in the gray matter of the mediobasal part of the temporal lobe. The positivity of GFAP immunocytochemistry revealed a definite astrocytosis in the affected parts of the gray matter. In the temporal and frontal cortex scattered ballooned cells (achromatic or Pick cells) were seen in αB-crystallin immunohistochemistry. These findings confirmed the diagnosis of the case of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive intraneuronal inclusions (FTLD-U) without tau-positivity. The separation of the different forms in the group of the frontotemporal dementias is recommended by means of the modern immunocytochemical examinations.]

Clinical Neuroscience

AUGUST 20, 2003

[Two cases of frontotemporal dementia]

SZABÓ Erzsébet, SZABÓ Mihály

[Frontotemporal dementias represent the third most common cause of primer degenerative dementias next to Alzheimer’s disease and Lewy body disease. Frontotemporal dementia constitutes 10-20% of all praesenilis dementias. The authors present the results of the 10 years' clinical, neuropsychological, neuropathological examinations and brain imaging with the examples of two cases. At the early stage of frontotemporal dementia changes of personality and social conduct are prominent, whereas cognitive functions are relativelly well preserved. The usual dementia tests are not sufficiently sensitive to disclose noncognitive symptoms. Clinical diagnosis as well as differentiation from functional psychiatric disorders can be difficult. Brain imaging present the frontal and the anterior temporal lobe atrophy and selective hypometabolism in these areas. The typical onset is between at the age 50 and 65 years. It is very rare under the age of 30. The symptoms of two patients started at the age of 42-44. The first diagnosis was post traumatic stress disorder. Later stereotyped behaviour, mental rigidity, hyperorality, irritability, progressive reduction of speech and vegetative dysfunctions appeared. Besides the affecting of the irresistibly worsening symptoms and the medical care requiring strength and inventiveness, the authentic informing of the relatives is also a challenge. The caregivers have special relationship with the patients and their relatives.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 21, 2004

[PRIMARY TUBULOINTERSTITIAL NEPHRITIS]

FERENCZI Sándor

[Primary tubulointerstitial nephritis is characterised by an inflammatory infiltrate of tubulointerstitial space. The infiltrate consists of T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, neutrophyl and eosinophyl granulocytes in varying degree. It is associated with interstitial oedema and different level of tubular damage. The disease exists in acute and chronic form. The main causes of this condition are: drugs, infection, systemic diseases, malignancy and in some cases the disease is idiopathic. The pathogenesis in most cases is immune-mediated. The secondary form of tubulointerstitial nephritis can occur in primary glomerular and vascular disease and is characterised by tubulointerstitial fibrosis and tubulus atrophy. The morphological alterations are major determinants of the progression of chronic renal disease. In both forms of tubulointerstitial nephritis the development of renal insufficiency is often observed.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JUNE 02, 2009

[99-mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography examinations in genetically determined neurometabolic disorders]

ARANKA László, AMBRUS Edit, VÖRÖS Erika, SVEKUS András, KÓBOR Jenõ, BEREG Edit, PALATKA János, PÁVICS László

[The aim of our study was to determine regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in different types of enzymopathies. Patients and methods - Among the patients with genetically determined enzymopathies 3 patients had aminoacidopathies, and 11 had different types of encephalopathies, from which 10 had mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MEMP), and 1 patient had hyperuricaemic encephalopathy. Besides the mentioned 14 patients, 1 had ceroid lipofuscinosis and another patient had tuberous sclerosis. The further distribution of the MEMP patients’ group was the following - 5 patients had MEMP with lactic acidosis, 5 had Leigh’s disease (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy), from which 1 had cytochrome-c-oxidase deficiency (COX). Additionally in all patients were performed cerebral MRI and SPECT examination 10 min. after intravenous administration of 20 Mbq/kg 99 mTc-HMPAO. Results - Fourteen out of 16 SPECT findings were pathologic, showing decreased focal frontal/temporal/temporoparietal cerebral blood perfusion. Aminoacidopathic group - all the 3 patients revealed pathologic signs from the aminoacidopathic patients’ group. Among them the ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) heterozygous female patient with left-sided hemiparesis caused by hyperammonemic stroke at 10 month-age, showed right sided temporoparietal, occipital and left frontal hypoperfusion, nearly 6 years after the cerebral vascular attack. This finding might be resulted because of diaschisis. Mitochondrial encephalo-myopathic (MEMP) group - all the four patients with MEMP and lactic acidosis showed focal hypoperfusion in the temporal region, while the perfusion was normal in the COX deficient patient and in 2 Leigh’s disease (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy) patients. In the remaining 1 Leigh’s patient frontotemporal hypoperfusion was found. In all patients there were non specific structural abnormalities detected by MRI - cortical and subcortical atrophy, and scattered demyelination foci. In the case of ceroid lipofuscinosis the MRI showed cerebral atrophy and cerebellar hypoplasia, and the SPECT showed right frontal and occipital hypoperfusion, bilateral parietal physiological riping process. The patient with tuberous sclerosis showed bilateral temporo-occipital hypoperfusion. Conclusion - 1. SPECT images demonstrated hypoperfusion rCBF changes in 14 out of all 16 patients. 2. Regional cerebral/cerebellar hypoperfusion was detected by SPECT in mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, with lactate acidosis and aminoacidopathies giving high informative value about the cerebral perfusion.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2006

[MULTIPLE SYSTEM ATROPHY: THE BEGINNING OF A NEW ERA IN THE HISTORY OF NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES]

PAPP Mátyás, KOVÁCS Tibor

[Multiple system atrophy (MSA) belongs to the neurodegenerative diseases of the nervous system, but it is different from them in many aspects: it has no familiar form and no genetic factor was identified in the pathomechanism. Its neuropathology is unique too, because oligodendroglial cells are harbouring the main pathological burden. It was described in MSA that there is no elective neuronal degeneration in neurodegenerative disorders: the glial cells show the same patochemical and structural abnormalities as found in the neurones. The discovery of the glial cytoplasmic inclusions, as a pathognostic marker for MSA, has directed attention to the glial cells in other neurodegenerative disorders. As a result of this, there are several neurodegenerative diseases nowadays in which glial inclusions were described, similar to the neuronal inclusions in their structural and biochemical properties and some of them became the diagnostic marker of the disease. In our review we summarize the clinical features, the history and the neuropathology of MSA and we discuss its special features.]

Clinical Neuroscience

DECEMBER 20, 2003

[HIV infection and neurology - long term follow-up of HIV infected children]

KOLLÁR Katalin, JELENIK Zsuzsanna, HEGELSBERGER Edit

[Objectives - Before the widespread introduction of combined antiretroviral therapy (1995) complications from HIV and AIDS in the central nervous system had been reported in larger proportion in infants and children than in adults: 80-90% versus 60-70%. Particular clinical manifestations tend to occur at different stages during the evolution of HIV infection. The authors review the neurological aspects of HIV infection. Method - First, a summary of the protocol of the neurological examinations and related experience is given. Then authors present the evaluation of neuro-psychological development, prevalence of neurological impairment and neuro-imaging of nine HIV infected children (seven boys, two girls) for the period of ten years (1991-2001). Three/ten children had vertically transmitted HIV, six/nine were infected by a nosocomial route in their early childhood. Children were regularly followed up from the diagnosis of HIV. The median follow up time has been 79 month (range: 18-144 month). Four patients died during the study period. The neurological status, the motor and mental development were examined at three month intervals or monthly under one year of age. EEG was performed every six month and CT/MRI once a year. All patients received combined antiretroviral treatment and immunglobulin therapy continuously. Results - Three/nine children have normal development, one/nine has hyperactive and attention deficit disorder with normal IQ range, two/nine have slight, one/nine moderate and two/nine serious mental retardation. Mild neurological signs were found in two children, various moderate and serious neuro/psychological symptoms were found in four patients, one of them was treated with benign epilepsy too. There was also close correlation between the clinical symptoms and the results of EEG examination (diffuse background slowing) and results of neuroimaging studies (cortical atrophy, calcification of the basal ganglia, toxoplasma abscesses). According to the results of different examinations three/nine children were found to be symptom-free, one/nine case showed the static form, two/nine patients showed the plateau form, two/nine the rapid progressive form and one/nine the progressive infantile form of AIDS encephalopathy. The majority of the patients suffered from adapting problems and difficulties of socialisation since their families lives were damaged by isolation and rejection from the community. Conclusion - The regular neurological and psychological examinations completed with EEG, CT/MRI were very informative to follow the course of neuro-psychological problems of HIV infected children. Symptom-free patients have to face psychosocial problems too, which cause much more damage in their mental progress than HIV itself.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 10, 2008

[DISEASES OF THE EXOCRINE PANCREAS AND DIABETES MELLITUS]

CZAKÓ László

[Exocrine and endocrine pancreas constitutes close anatomical and functional links accordingly, any disease affecting one of these sectors will inevitably affect the other. Acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic surgery, cystic fibrosis and pancreatic cancer are those pancreatic conditions that might cause diabetes mellitus. The development of diabetes greatly influences the prognosis and quality of life of patients with exocrine pancreatic diseases. The lack of glucagon and the impaired absorption of nutrients may cause life-threatening complications, such as hypoglycaemia, and the micro- and macrovascular complications may impair the organ functions. Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor of mortality in those with exocrine pancreatic diseases. Pancreatic diabetes is a distinct metabolic and clinical form of diabetes, requires special treatment. Diet and pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy may be sufficient in the early stages. Oral antidiabetic drugs are not recommended. If the diet proves inadequate to reach the glycaemic goals, regular insulin treatment is demanded. There are special impairments of the exocrine function and the pancreatic morphology at diabetic patients that resemble to chronic pancreatitis. Atrophy of the exocrine tissue may caused by the lack of trophic insulin. Hyperglycaemia can activate the stellate cells that lead to pancreatic fibrosis. The microangiopathy and neuropathy, as well as the lack of islet hormone action - responsible for the exocrine pancreas regulation - will cause further damage on the pancreas glandular tissue. In the event of a proven impairment of the pancreatic exocrine function in diabetes mellitus, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is recommended. This may improve the nutritional condition and decrease the metabolic instability.]