Search results

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

[A visual based proto-consciousness model of human thinking]

SZŐKE Henrik, HEGYI Gabriella, CSÁSZÁR Noémi, VAS József Pál, KAPÓCS Gábor, BÓKKON István

[Background and objectives – Here we present our results of many years of research on the visual (pictorial) representation model expanded with some new ideas in a simplified form. Our goal is to make available our new pictorial model for a broader scientific community and to point to its possible importance in the future. Method – Own scientific publications, selective literature analysis and preliminary experiments. Results – Our several scientific publications and preliminary experiments were presented outlining our new molecular visual representation model as brain might be able to generate internal images by regulated biophotons in early V1 retinotopic visual regions. We also proposed that some of symptoms and characteristics of autism and savantism may suggest that visual (pictorial) thinking might be a possible cognitive model in the case of healthy people as well. Our model can present a uniform molecular basis for many visual related phenomena. Conclusions – It is possible that a so-called visual proto-consciousness might be developed in evolution, which is directly related to the retinotopic visual areas, and which has a different cognitive ability from verbal abilities. If our model can be exactly proved it presents a common molecular basis for various visual phenomena such as visual perception and imagination, phosphenes ect. and might open new ways in several fields of science such as visual prosthesis for the blind, artificial intelligence, visual neuroscience, cognitive and autism research.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

[Systemic thrombolysis and endovascular intervention in postpartum stroke]

BERECZKI Dániel Jr., NÉMETH Beatrix, MAY Zsolt, SZAKÁCS ZOLTÁN, GUBUCZ István, SZIKORA István, SZILÁGYI Géza

[Introduction - There are no previously published cases about intravenously applied recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke during puerperium. Case presentation - We report a 40-year-old woman with postpartum acute ischemic stroke caused by multiple cervical artery dissections treated by systemic thrombolysis and endovascular intervention. Discussion - There are only limited data regarding thrombolytic treatment in acute stroke during pregnancy and puerperium. Current acute stroke treatment guidelines - while considering pregnancy as a relative exclusion criterion - do not deal with the postpartum state. Conclusion - As the condition is rare, randomized controlled trials are not feasible, therefore further reports on similar cases could eventually help us suggest guidelines or at least propose recommendations for the acute thrombolytic treatment of strokes occurring in pregnancy and puerperium.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[Sleep disordered breathing and epilepsy: relationships and therapeutic considerations]

FALUDI Béla, BÓNÉ Beáta, KOMOLY Sámuel, JANSZKY József

[The importance of the sleep related breathing disorders (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, central sleep apnea, and Cheyne-Stokes breathing) in the pathophysiology crebro- and cardiovascular disorders is well known. The relationship of sleep related breathing abnormalities and epilepsy is also important but underestimated in the daily practice. The relation is bidirectional. The breathing abnormalities in sleep may play important role in generating epileptic seizure, but the adverse effect of seizure and antiepileptic therapy (generation of apneas and hypopneas) may worsen the seizure control. The effect of new therapies (vagal nerve and deep brain stimulation) on the sleep architecture and sleep disordered breathing must be examined and discussed. Here we present a brief case of epileptic patient with deep brain stimulation therapy on sleep as well. The examination of the sleep related breathing abnormalities in epilepsy patient may help improve the effectiveness of antiepileptic therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

[Endoscopic removal of tuberculum sellae meningeoma through endonasal transsphenoidal approach]

FÜLÖP Béla, BELLA Zsolt, PALÁGYI Péter, BARZÓ Pál

[Experiences acquired in our department with endoscope assisted microsurgical transsphenoidal pituitary surgery encouraged us to expanded the endoscopic approach to skull base lesions. The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach proved to be less traumatic to the traditional microsurgical approaches, yet very effective. The endoscopic transsphenoidal technique was applied in a patient havin anterior skull base tumor. The patient was a 49-year-old woman with several months history of left visual defect. The magnetic resonance (MR) scans of the skull revealed a midline anterior fossa space-occupying lesion measuring 21×16×22 mm located on planum sphenoidale, tuberculum sellae and intrasellar. The tumor compressed both optic nerves and optic chiasm. Total resection of the tumor was achieved by use of endoscopic transnasal, transsphenoidal technique. This is the first reported case of an anterior fossa meningeoma being treated by an endoscopic transsphenoidal technique in Hungary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[Novel strategy in the radiotherapy of metastatic brain tumors: simultaneous whole brain radiotherapy and integrated stereotactic radiosurgery]

KALINCSÁK Judit, LÁSZLÓ Zoltán, SEBESTYÉN Zsolt, KOVÁCS Péter, HORVÁTH Zsolt, DÓCZI Tamás, MAGNEL László

[Background and purpose – Treatment of central nervous system (CNS) tumors has always played an important role in development of radiotherapy techniques. Precise patient immobilisation, non-coplanar field arrangement, conformal treatment, arc therapy, radiosurgery, application of image fusion to radiation planning or re-irradiation were first introduced into clinical routine in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods – A modern multifunctional radiation instrument, Novalis TX has been installed at the University of Pécs two years ago. New methods, such as real time 3D image guided therapy, dynamic arc therapy and ultra-conformity offer further progress in treatment of CNS tumors. Whole brain irradiation and simultaneous fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery or integrated boost seem to be an optimal method in the treatment of not only soliter or oligo, but even a higher number (4-9) and not typically radiosensitive brain metastases. The new treatment strategy is illustrated by presentation of four case histories. Results – Treatment protocol was completed in all cases. Treatment period of 1.5 to 3 weeks, and treatment time of only a few minutes were not stressful for the patients. A quite remarkable clinical improvement as to general condition of the patients was experienced in three cases. Follow-up images confirmed either remission or a stable disease. Conclusions – Simultaneous whole brain radiotherapy and integrated stereotactic radiosurgery is a reproducible, safe method that offers an effective irradiation with delivery of definitive dosage even in cases with radio-insensitive brain metastasis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

[Antecedents to the commencement and history of the West- Pannonic neurological forum]

GARZULY Ferenc, GRUBITS János, NIKL János

[Introduction - Numerous professional groups and sections for the medical specialities have been organized since 1953 in the West-Transdanubian region of Hungary, but such association of neurologists had not occured. Establishing the West-Pannonic Neurological Forum - The lack of regional collaboration among neurologists was related to several factors, among which the most important factor was the lack of a regional medical university, which could coordinate the professional activities. This severe gap necessitated in 1998 the organization of a professional group, that has become a driver for case-consulting conferences and different postgraduate trainings for the physicians specialized in neurology, neurosurgery and neurorehabilitation in counties of Győr-Moson-Sopron, Vas, Veszprém and Zala. The functioning of the Forum - Meetings are organized twice a year for physicians and paramedical staff (nurses, hospital attendants, physiotherapists) on Thursdays afternoons in different towns of the region, in two sections. The lectures are followed by a buffet, after which everyone can get home before too late. Ocasionally guest-lecturers are invited to present scientific topics from Hungarian universities or abroad. However, the main form of the presentations is defined as case discussion. Conclusions - The numbers of platform and other presentations in the physicians’s section have exceeded half a thousand, while in the paramedical section reached the threehundreds. At the 38. meeting of the Forum in January of this year, the number of participants was more than twohundreds, reflecting that both physicians and their coworkers are greatly interested in this form of interactions.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[Hyperglycaemic hemiballismus: implications from connectivity analysis for cognitive impairments]

KINCSES Tamás Zsigmond, VADÁSZ Dávid, NÉMETH Dezsõ, JANACSEK Karolina, SZABÓ Nikoletta, DÉZSI Lívia, BABOS Magor, VÖRÖS Erika, VÉCSEI László

[Hyperglycaemia induced movement disorders, such as hemiballism are rare disorders. The syndrome is characterised by the triad of hemiballism, contralateral T1-hyperintense striatal lesion and non-ketotic hyperglycaemia. Here we report a patient with untreated diabetes presenting with acute onset of hemiballism. MRI revealed T1 hyperintensity of the head of the caudate nucleus and the anterior putamen. The patient also had acantocytosis. Based on the detailed examination of the neuroradiological results and earlier findings we will imply on the pathomechanism. Based on previous findings microhemorrhages, extensive mineralisation, gemistocytic astrocytosis might play role in the development of the imaging signs. The connectivity pattern of the striatal lesion showed extensive connections to the frontal cortex. In coexistence with that the most severe impairment was found on the phonemic verbal fluency task measuring frontal executive functions. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy related inflammation: is susceptibility weighted imaging the clue for diagnosis?

CSÉCSEI Péter, KOMOLY Sámuel, SZAPÁRY László, BARSI Péter

Background - Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri) is characterized by various neurological symptoms such as gradually developing confusion, progressive cognitive decline, seizure or headaches; T2 hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); and neuropathological evidence of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and associated vascular or perivascular inflammation. Although histological confirmation is necessary for accurate diagnosis, in case of typical clinical features and neuroimaging, the diagnosis can be established without biopsy. Case summary - We present the case of a 57-year-old man with a history of hypertension who presented to the emer¬gency department 3-week history of progressive headache and a gradually developing altered mental status. On examination, he was found to have left sided weakness and decreased pscyhomotility. Routine clinical work-up (lab investigations, CT, cerebrospinal fluid analysis) did not show obvious diagnosis, so we performed an MRI. It raised the suspicion of CAA-ri which diagnosis was verified by neuroradiological evaluation. High dose steroid treatment was initiated. The patient rapidly responded to treatment, his focal neurological signs resolved. Control MRI after 1.5 months showed multiple haemorrhagic laesions in the field of previous inflammation which posteriorly supported the previous supposed work-diagnosis. Conclusions - Although histopathology is the gold standard for the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, the typical clinical presentation, good response to steroids and accurate neuroradiological criteria make biopsy unnecessary to diagnose CAA-ri.

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

[Financing of medicines for treatment of rare diseases of the nervous system. orphan drugs in rare neurological diseases]

SZEGEDI Márta, KOSZTOLÁNYI György, BONCZ Imre, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Objectives – Nervous system involvement is expected up to 60-70% in case of rare diseases. This article aims to present the financial methods and expenditures of rare neurological diseases’ orphan medicinal products being financed in the frame of Hungarian social insurance system in 2012. Methods – The subsidized orphan medicines were selected on the Orphanet portal 2012 while orphans financed by compessionate use were provided by the Hungarian National Insurance Fund Administration (OEP) database. Three products exist without orphan designation, however those are intended for the treatment of rare neurological ailments. The medicines were categorized by financial methods and determined by costs. Results – Numerically, out of 36 pieces of subsidized orphan or orphan criteria fulfilled medicines 17 were authorized for the treatments of rare neurological diseases in the year of 2012. Most of the drugs (14 pieces) were to be financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system. The cost amount of social insurance for 387 rare neurological disease patients reached more than 4.5 billion HUF (1.4% of the total pharmaceutical budget in outpatient care). Conclusions – In Hungary half of the subsidized orphans are intended for the treatments of rare neurological ailments. 30% of the total amount of social insurance for rare diseases’ medicinal treatments were used to subsidizing rare neurological disease patients in 2012. Most of the orphan medicines were to be financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system for outpatient care. Consequently, a great deal of crucial problems occurred in relation with the unconventional subsidizing method. At the end of 2012 new financial methods have been elaborated and introduced in a pilot phase from 1 January 2013. In spite of the high cost commitment, nearly the entire diagnosed rare disease subpopulation have been provided with subsidized treatments in Hungary. In order to facilitate the acces to orphan medicines, collaboration shall be achieved by financing authority and professionals for identificating the descently sustainable, affordable and viable financial method. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

[The diagnostic and management challenges for posterior reversible leucoencephalopathy syndrome]

KILIC COBAN Eda, GEZ Sedat, KARA Batuhan, SOYSAL Aysun

[Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by epileptic seizures, headaches, altered mental status and focal neurological signs. Hypertension is the second most common condition associated with PRES. The 50-year-old-male patient with right-sided hemiparesis and speech disturbances admitted to our clinic. His blood pressure at the emergency service was 220/140 mmHg. A left putaminal hematoma was seen in his CT and MRI. In his brain MRI, FLAIR and T2 –weighted sequences showed bilateral symmetric diffuse hyperintensities in the brain stem, basal ganglia, and occipital, parietal, frontal, and temporal lobes. After the intense antihypertensive drug treatment, his blood pressure came to normal limits within a week. During his hospitalisation he had a recurrent speech disturbance lasting an hour. His electroencephalography was normal. In his repeated diffusion weighted MRI, an acute lacunary infarct was seen on right centrum semiovale. Two months later, the control MRI showed only the previous lacuner infarcts and the chronic putaminal hematoma. We presented a case developping either a cerebral hemorrhage or a lacunar infarction due to PRES. The main reason of the following complications of the disease was delayed diagnosis. Uncontrolled hypertension was guilted for the events. ]