Search results

LAM KID

DECEMBER 10, 2012

[The effects of targeted therapies on bones]

SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[Arthritis is associated with local as well as generalised bone loss. It is likely that similar inflammatory/immunological factors contribute to both types of bone loss. Today, the main targets of arthritis therapy are proinflammatory citokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, in the future IL-17) and the inhibition of B and T cells. All biological therapies have been proved to slow down the development of focal joint destruction. TNF-inhibitors in particular have been demonstrated to have a beneficial effect on generalised osteoporosis. In ankylosing spondylitis, generalised osteoporosis and locally increased bone formation occur at the same time, creating a controversial situation. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the effects of targeted therapy on bones.]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 08, 2012

[The interpretation of metabolic syndrome]

KÉKES Ede, KISS István

[The significant increase of the splanchnic ectopic fat, the disturbance of carbohidrate metabolism, atherogenic dyslipidemia and high blood pressure creates the syndrome so called deadly quartet. These components promote the early appearance of cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease, etc.) as well as the enormous growth of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It was thought, that the ectopic fat is the only background of the syndrome and the insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia as well as the disruption of associated endocrine regulatory balance system and elevated sympathetic drive explain jointly the clinical events. We now know that cytokines released by ectopic fat issue (CRP, TNF-α, IL-6 etc.) launch processes in our organism, which contribute to the development of vascular remodelling, endothelial dysfunction and in the end to that of atherothrombotic processes. The diagnostic criteria of the syndrome were changed continuously parallel growing theoretical knowledge till 2009, when on the Harmony Conference the important components of the syndrome were accepted, but some laboratory and other parameters do not enter into everyday praxis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 20, 2012

[Rivaroxaban in prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation]

SIMONYI Gábor, MEDVEGY Mihály

[Atrial fibrillation (AF) is well established risk factor for cardioembolic stroke. With thromboprophylatic treatment we can reduce the risk of stroke in patients with AF. Oral vitamin K antagonists (VKA) such as warfarin and acenocoumarol are effective for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. VKAs are associated with several limitations including very narrow therapeutic range, several factors (diet, drugs, alcohol consumption) affecting the effect of VKA and excessive bleeding may occur if INR value not controlled successfully. New oral anticoagulant direct Xa factor inhibitor rivaroxaban has a good therapeutic efficacy in prevention (primary and secondary) of stroke in AF patients. Its advantages are including no need for monitoring, fixed oral dose, not affected by meal, age and body weight, all of them can improve patient adherence. In ROCKET AF trial in patients with AF, rivaroxaban was noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism. There was no significant between-group difference in the risk of major bleeding, although intracranial and fatal bleeding occurred less frequently in the rivaroxaban group.]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 22, 2011

[Association between sleep disorders and inflammation among kidney transplant recipients]

FORNÁDI Katalin, LINDNER Anett, CZIRA Mária Eszter, SZENTKIRÁLYI András, LÁZÁR S. Alpár, ZOLLER Rezső, TURÁNYI Csilla, VÉBER Orsolya, NOVÁK Márta, MUCSI István, MOLNÁR Miklós Zsolt

[In patients on dialysis, the results of studies examining the association of sleep disorders and inflammation are controversial. We assessed the association between inflammatory markers and different sleep disorders in a large sample of kidney transplant recipients. In the cross-sectional study 100 randomly selected kidney transplanted patients underwent one-night polysomnography [“SLeep disorders Evaluation in Patients after kidney Transplantation (SLEPT) Study”] to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and periodic limb movement is sleep (PLMS). Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) was used to assess the prevalence of insomnia. Socio-demographic information, data on medication, comorbidity and laboratory parameters were collected. Inflammatory markers such as Creactive protein (CRP), serum albumin, white blood cell count, interleukine-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured. The mean age was 51±13 years (43% female) and the prevalence of diabetes 19%. We found no significant difference in the levels of inflammatory markers between patients with OSA and PLMS versus (vs) patients without such disorders. Apnea-hypopnea index showed a significant association with white blood cell count (rho=0.23), and weak, non significant correlations with the other inflammatory markers (rho<|0.15|). PLM index showed weak, non significant correlations with all markers of inflammation (rho<|0.15|). The serum IL-6 level was significantly higher in patients with insomnia (AIS≥10) than in non-insomniacs [median (IQR): 3.2 (2.6-5.1) vs. 1.7 (1.2- 2.9) ng/l; p=0.009]. The levels of other inflammatory markers were similar between insomniacs and non-insomniacs. We did not find any association between the presence of objectively assessed sleep disorders and inflammatory markers in kidney transplant patients.]

LAM KID

DECEMBER 23, 2011

[The pathogenic and clinical significance of the RANK-RANKL-osteoprotegerin system in rheumatoid arthritis]

SZENTPÉTERY Ágnes, VÁNCSA Andrea, SZABÓ Zoltán, SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by increased local and generalised bone resorption, which manifests in the develoment of marginal erosions and generalised osteoporosis, respectively. An increasing number of data suggest that lymphocytes, proinflammatory cytokines and other mediators involved in inflammation contribute to arthritic bone resorption. Therefore, the term ‘osteoimmunology’ has also become widely used. In RA, Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor kappa B (RANK) and its ligand (RANKL) play a crucial role in bone resorption. These proteins, which belong to the tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-a) receptor and TNF ligand superfamilies, respectively, activate osteoclasts while interacting with T cells, synovial fibroblasts and other cytokines (e.g. IL-1, IL-17), which results in bone resorption. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a decoy receptor that also belongs to the TNF receptor family and inhibits RANK-RANKL interactions. There is increased RANKL production and decreased OPG production in RA. The interaction of RANKL with IL-17 is particularly important. Regarding therapy, sulfasalazine, methotrexate and biological agents, especially TNF inhibitors suppress RANKL-mediated bone resorption and thus the development of joint erosions. RANKL-RANK interaction can be directly inhibited by recombinant OPG or anti-RANKL antibody (denosumab). Among these agents, denosumab gave promising results in experiments performed in animal models of arthritis. These were followed by a phase II human RA trial, which proved that denosumab decreased MRI erosion scores in RA.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

DECEMBER 15, 2011

[ANTIHYPERTENSIVE THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH COPD - THE SIGNIFICANCE OF NEBIVOLOL]

FARSANG Csaba

[The occurrence of hypertension associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing. Recognising COPD is important in order to choose the appropriate antihypertensive drugs. Antihypertensive drugs that can be used to treat patients with hypertension and COPD include diuretics, ACE-inhibitors, angiotensine receptor blockers (AT1 receptor antagonists) and calcium antagonists, as well as cardioselective beta blockers, as these drugs decrease total and cardiovascular mortality. Of these agents, the importance of the most cardioselective one, nebivolol should be stressed, as this drug has no clinically significant effect on parameters of respiratory function, and, through its additional effects (namely by increasing the synthesis of NO), it has a beneficial effect on COPD-related deterioration of respiratory functions, haemodynamic alterations (cor pulmonale) and local factors that participate in the respiratory inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 20, 2011

[Antihypertensive therapy in patients with COPD - the significance of nebivolol]

FARSANG Csaba

[The occurrence of hypertension associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing. Recognising COPD is important in order to choose the appropriate antihypertensive drugs. Anti-hypertensive drugs that can be used to treat patients with hypertension and COPD include diuretics, ACE-inhibitors, angioten-sine receptor blockers (AT1 receptor antagonists) and calcium antagonists, as well as cardioselective beta blockers, as these drugs decrease total and cardiovascular mortality. Of these agents, the importance of the most cardioselective one, nebivolol should be stressed, as this drug has no clinically significant effect on parameters of respiratory function, and, through its additional effects (namely by increasing the synthesis of NO), it has a beneficial effect on COPD-related deterioration of respiratory functions, haemodynamic alterations (cor pulmonale) and local factors that participate in the respiratory inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 20, 2011

[Antihypertensive therapy in patients with COPD 699 - The significance of nebivolol]

FARSANG Csaba

[The occurrence of hypertension associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing. Recognising COPD is important in order to choose the appropriate antihypertensive drugs. Antihypertensive drugs that can be used to treat patients with hypertension and COPD include diuretics, ACE-inhibitors, angiotensine receptor blockers (AT1 receptor antagonists) and calcium antagonists, as well as cardioselective beta blockers, as these drugs decrease total and cardiovascular mortality. Of these agents, the importance of the most cardioselective one, nebivolol should be stressed, as this drug has no clinically significant effect on parameters of respiratory function, and, through its additional effects (namely by increasing the synthesis of NO), it has a beneficial effect on COPD-related deterioration of respiratory functions, haemodynamic alterations (cor pulmonale) and local factors that participate in the respiratory inflammation and endothelial dysfunction.]

Hungarian Immunology

MARCH 20, 2006

[Familial autoinflammatory syndromes]

ORBÁN Ilonka, BALOGH Zsolt

[A group of rare inherited disorders, the familial autoinflammatory syndromes are characterised by attacks of seemingly unprovoked inflammation without significantly elevated autoantibody and autoreactive T cell levels. The rare diseases are present from infancy to lifelong, with periodic fever attacks and usually are accompanied by recurrent systemic inflammatory symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhoea, rash, arthralgia, polyarthritis, polyserositis, ocular disorders are separated by symptom-free intervals. Referred to as hereditary periodic fever syndromes appear by spontaneous crisis attacks and reveal a severe acute-phase response during the fever. In their pathogenesis there are no evidence neither of infection nor the common characteristics for autoimmune diseases: the production of high-titer auto-antibodies and antigenspecific T cell activation. The basic disease mechanism consists of the recently identified mutations in genes enconding important proteins: pyrin, cryopyrin, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) receptor and other mediators of apoptosis, inflammation and morbid citokine processing. The differential diagnosis of the diseases is not easy, their treatment is not resolved, although in same cases the biological treatment may be efficacious.]

Clinical Neuroscience

APRIL 20, 2002

[Regulatory mechanisms in focal cerebral ischemia. Perspectives in neuroprotective treatment]

NAGY Zoltán, SIMON László, BORI Zoltán

[Permanent or temporary disruption of cerebral blood flow rapidly depletes brain regions of their limited energy reserves (glycogen, glucose, oxygen, ATP) leading to an energy crisis. Tissue damage occurs due to the energy crisis. The central part of the damage, the ischaemic “core” region is surrounded by zones of the shell-like penumbra. Necrotic, as well as apoptotic cell death could be identified in the penumbra. Going away from the ischaemic core different neurochemical processes are occuring by space and time.“Immediate early response” genes (c-fos, fos-B, c-Jun, krox 20, 24) are activated, heatshock proteins (hsp 70, 72, HSF, HSE, HIF), cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β), inflammatory factors (COX), adhesion and glial factors (ICAM-1, ELAM-1, P-selectin), vasoactive factors (IL -6, -10, PAF), reactive oxigen radicals and connected factors (O2, OH, NO, NOS, SOD) are produced within minutes and hours. Cell deaths, necrosis and apoptosis due to the activation of calpains, caspases and nucleases occur in days. In parallel, growth factors and plasticity proteins (BDNF, NGF, TGF-β, VEGF, PDGF, GAP-43) are activated as a basis of functional rehabilitation.]