Lege Artis Medicinae

[“Vires unitae agunt” - way of the unification: medical professionalization in 18-19. centuries Hungary]

SIMON Katalin

JUNE 20, 2018

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2018;28(04-05)

[European and Hungarian medicine and its representatives changed a lot between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. The varied ’medical market’ altered significantly from the eighteenth century. The acts of the enlightened absolutism, which were attentive to the health of the citizens and the public, set up those processes, which led to modern medical education and medical professionalization. During this process, some kind of healers were raised out of craftsmen, folk healers (such as surgeons, pharmacists, midwives, veterinarians), others were supplanted (for Example sellers of essential oils). After the initiation from above, doctors of medicine and masters of surgery became self-conscious in the Hungarian Reform Era, first forms of self-organization, as so the demand of professional retraining and discussions appeared via the new journals, associations and assemblies. The biggest question was the liquidation and the unification of the dual education of doctors of medicine and masters of surgery, which descended from the Middle Ages, but became obsolete, thanks to the new achievements of the medicine and surgery. The two were united in 1872, when the title doctor medicinae universalis set up. The Public Health Act of Hungary in 1876 (Art. XIV) and the independent la­bour organizations of doctors (for Example the Associations of Doctors in Budapest and in the countryside, which were established in 1897) promoted the formation of the modern medical profession. ]

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