Lege Artis Medicinae

[UNSOLVED THERAPY - COMPLEX TREATMENT OF BUERGER’S DISEASE]

SZOMJÁK Edit, DÉR Henrietta, KEREKES György, VERES Katalin, DEZSŐ Balázs, TAKÁCS István, TÓTH Judit, MÓZES Péter, SOLTÉSZ Pál

JULY 14, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(06-07)

[INTRODUCTION - Buerger’s disease is a nonatherosclerotic, segmental, inflammatory, progressive obliterative disease of the blood vessels that most commonly affects the small and medium-sized arteries and also the veins of the lower limb. It is strongly associated with tobacco use. CASE REPORT - A 37-year-old heavy smoker forest worker presented with severe gangrenous changes on the fingers as the upper limb manifestations of Buerger’s disease, which required acral amputation. After complex medical treatment, pharmacological sympathectomy on the left side and surgical sympathectomy on the right side, bilateral conserving necrectomy, cessation of smoking and 2 cycles of cyclophosphamid, the patient's status significantly improved, his pain diminished and, although to a limited extent, he could use both hands. CONCLUSIONS - Buerger’s disease is a disorder with unclear aethiology and is difficult to diagnose. Despite of a good prognosis, a causal treatment is not yet possible, so any antithrombotic, haemorheological, vasodilator or immunosuppressive therapy that have been reported to have beneficial effect should be considered for treatment.]

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