Lege Artis Medicinae

[Treatment of the sexually transmitted diseases]

TELEGDY László

JULY 14, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(06-07)

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Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[A Street Child’s Way to the Nobel Prize]

KÖVES Péter

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Errors and complications from the surgeon’s point of view]

GAÁL Csaba

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Polycystic ovary syndrome – in 2008]

PETRÁNYI Gyula

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Knowledge Kept Up-to-Date]

ECKHARDT Sándor

Lege Artis Medicinae

[UNSOLVED THERAPY - COMPLEX TREATMENT OF BUERGER’S DISEASE]

SZOMJÁK Edit, DÉR Henrietta, KEREKES György, VERES Katalin, DEZSŐ Balázs, TAKÁCS István, TÓTH Judit, MÓZES Péter, SOLTÉSZ Pál

[INTRODUCTION - Buerger’s disease is a nonatherosclerotic, segmental, inflammatory, progressive obliterative disease of the blood vessels that most commonly affects the small and medium-sized arteries and also the veins of the lower limb. It is strongly associated with tobacco use. CASE REPORT - A 37-year-old heavy smoker forest worker presented with severe gangrenous changes on the fingers as the upper limb manifestations of Buerger’s disease, which required acral amputation. After complex medical treatment, pharmacological sympathectomy on the left side and surgical sympathectomy on the right side, bilateral conserving necrectomy, cessation of smoking and 2 cycles of cyclophosphamid, the patient's status significantly improved, his pain diminished and, although to a limited extent, he could use both hands. CONCLUSIONS - Buerger’s disease is a disorder with unclear aethiology and is difficult to diagnose. Despite of a good prognosis, a causal treatment is not yet possible, so any antithrombotic, haemorheological, vasodilator or immunosuppressive therapy that have been reported to have beneficial effect should be considered for treatment.]

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Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

Cyanocobalamin and cholecalciferol synergistically improve functional and histopathological nerve healing in experimental rat model

ALBAY Cem, ADANIR Oktay, AKKALP Kahraman Asli, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GULAEC Akif Mehmet, BEYTEMUR Ozan

Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

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