Lege Artis Medicinae

[Their Song is for Eternity]

VAS József Pál

JANUARY 22, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(01)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[Honest information?]

dr. HEGEDŰS Katalin, ROZSOS Erzsébet, dr. TIBOR, Jakab

Lege Artis Medicinae

[“WHAT DO YOU THINK HAPPENS TO THOSE WHO RARELY GO OUTDOORS?”]

PLUHÁR F. Zsuzsanna, KOVÁCS Szilvia, PIKÓ Bettina, UZZOLI Annamária

[INTRODUCTION - The surrounding environment plays an important role in the development of psychosomatic symptoms. This study examines what children think of the consequences of not going outdoors for long periods. METHODS - Data were collected using the “draw-and-write” technique that besides the written answers allows children to express their thoughts in drawings. The questionnaire contained open-ended questions both on sociodemographic data and on the children’s notion of the relationship between environment and health or illness. Questionnaire submission was voluntary and anonymous. The study subjects were 9 to 11-year-old pupils (n=448, 44.6% boys, 55.4% girls) from six primary schools, two in Budapest, and one each in Pest, Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok, Csongrád and Békés counties. The primary schools were selected so as to represent various environmental locations, such as urban, town, suburban residential, area of blocks of flats. RESULTS - We found that all children agreed in that those who don't go outdoors for a long time will, in one way or another, get sick. Illnesses mentioned in the answers were classified in two categories, physical and mental. Physical health problems were further divided into four subcategories: symptoms (e.g., anaemia, pallor, fever, weak joints or bones); diseases; obesity; death. Mental health problems were divided into two subcategories: actual psychiatric diseases (e.g., depression) and symptoms, such as unhappiness, sadness, anger. CONCLUSIONS - We conclude that children in this study sample reckon the close connection between staying indoors for prolonged periods and the development of symptoms and disease.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Errors of the Amended Version]

dr. KALÓ Zoltán

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Most recent data on drug-eluting stents]

FÜLÖP Gábor, BERTA Balázs, MERKELY Béla

Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES IN HUNGARY AFTER THE MILLENNIUM]

VOKÓ Zoltán, SZÉLES György, KARDOS László, NÉMETH Renáta, ÁDÁNY Róza

[INTRODUCTION - Here we present the descriptive epidemiology of stroke in Hungary including mortality, morbidity, functional limitation and inpatient care based on the most recent health statistical data. METHODS - Mortality data were analysed by direct and indirect standardisation, and geographical mapping based on empirical Bayesian smoothing. Morbidity data were obtained from the General Practitioners’ Morbidity Sentinel Station Program and the National Health Surveys. The latter also provided data on functional limitation. Data on inpatient service were taken from the European Hospital Morbidity Database of WHO. RESULTS - Hungarian stroke mortality continued to decrease in recent years, and the slope of the decrease was larger than in Western Europe. Stroke mortality was highest in the Northern- Hungarian Region, and in Somogy and Zala counties. The incidence of stroke was 1.5-2 times higher than in the developed countries in most age groups. Over 64 years of age, a decline of stroke incidence was observed, especially in men. In this age group approximately 10% of men and 7% of women had already had a stroke. Of these patients more than 10% needed assistance to get out of the bed, dress up, or eat. Hospitals reported more than 60 000 stroke cases in 2005. CONCLUSION - Despite the promising trends in stroke mortality and now also in morbidity, both indices are still rather high in Hungary compared to those in Western-Europe. The relatively favourable epidemiological changes, however, may be overridden by the increased stroke burden resulting from the aging of the population.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Cyanocobalamin and cholecalciferol synergistically improve functional and histopathological nerve healing in experimental rat model

ALBAY Cem, ADANIR Oktay, AKKALP Kahraman Asli, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GULAEC Akif Mehmet, BEYTEMUR Ozan

Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Clinical neurophysiological methods in diagnosis and treatment of cerebrovascular diseases]

NAGY Ildikó, FABÓ Dániel

[Neurophysiological methods are gaining ground in the diagnosis and therapy of cerebrovascular disease. While the role of the EEG (electroencephalography) in the diagnosis of post-stroke epilepsy is constant, quantitative EEG para-meters, as new indicators of early efficiency after thrombolysis or in prognosis of patient’s condition have proved their effectiveness in several clinical studies. In intensive care units, continuous EEG monitoring of critically ill patients became part of neurointenzive care protocols. SSEP (somatosesnsory evoked potencial) and EEG performed during carotid endarterectomy, are early indicative intraoperativ neuromonitoring methods of poor outcome. Neurorehabilitation is a newly discovered area of neurophysiology. Clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. Brain computer interface mark the onset of modern rehabi-litation, where the function deficit is replaced by robotic tehnology. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

GABRIELLA BALÁS, ISTVÁN KOMOLY, SÁMUEL DÓCZI, TAMÁS JANSZKY, JÓZSEF ASCHERMANN, ZSUZSANNA NAGY, FERENC BOSNYÁK, EDIT KOVÁCS

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Paradigmal changes in renal replacement therapy. Dialysis and drug therapy of quality in chronic renal patients - Optimal and adequate opportunities of dialysis therapy]

KISS István, SZEGEDI János, FODOR Erzsébet, BARABÁS Noémi, REMPORT Ádám, AMBRUS Csaba, KULCSÁR Imre

[Researches over the past thirty years, many results have been related to acute and chronic renal failure pathophysiology, clinical characteristics and therapy. Can be more than just the uremic toxins and their characteristics of the regulation of salt and water balance, renal anemia treatment, uremic metabolic disorders, calcium phosphate and lipid metabolism dysfunction. Improve the quality of treatment and reduce mortality and options can be influenced by factors come to, therefore, execution and technique of dialysis therapy. We know the primary concern of the treatment period for reducing mortality. This is best for intermittent treatments increased (4.5-6 hours) treatment will help. Narrow scope is optional for the treatment several times a week treatment, the daily 8-hour long nightly therapy. The mortality of the patient significantly influenced by age, gender, co-morbidities, fluid balance and the CaxPO4. The technical side is the key factor influencing the dialysis fluid purity and membrane properties. The use of high-flux membranes is clearly improving the quality of treatment, the additional benefit of hemodiafiltration therapy, the mortality for those still controversial. For optimal dialysis adequacy, complexity may result in reducing mortality and improving the quality of life in chronic dialysis patients.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[SELF-PERCEIVED HEALTH AND PSYCHOSOCIAL WORK ENVIRONMENT. - STUDY AMONG HEALTH CARE STAFF IN SUBOTICA, SERBIA]

PIKÓ Bettina, PICZIL Márta

[INTRODUCTION - Studies have shown that work environment has a significant impact on workers’ health status and their reactions to stress, which may contribute to the development of illness, or, among health care staff, to burnout syndrome. The goal of the present study was to look at the relationship between psychosocial work environment and self-perceived health in a sample of health care staff living in Szabadka (Subotica, Serbia). METHODS - There were 253 health care workers in the study group. The majority were registered nurses, head nurses and assistants (together, 80.1%). Self-reported data were collected using a questionnaire on self-perceived health, frequency of psychosomatic symptoms, work shift pattern, and psychosocial work environment (e.g., the frequency of emotionally provoking situations or the level of dissatisfaction with work). RESULTS - Health care workers reported frequent experience of emotionally provoking situations. However, they often lack a connection network that would provide effective social support in these situations. In addition to the frequent occurrence of emotionally provoking situations and the lack of social support, voluntarily chosen extra work, shift work, and the low level of work satisfaction influence negatively their self-perceived health. CONCLUSIONS - The psychosocial work environment has a significant impact on the health care workers’ self-perceived health and the occurrence of psychosomatic symptoms. It would be necessary for health care workers to learn skills and techniques that help them cope with emotionally hard situations.]