Lege Artis Medicinae

[The vulnerable point]

KARDOS Piroska

APRIL 20, 2001

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2001;11(04)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[Conclusions of a 1980 year long-term health care prognosis]

FORGÁCS Iván

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[New oral antidiabetic agents - New aspects in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus]

GERŐ László

[During the past years several new oral antidiabetic agents have become available and more new drugs of this type are expected to appear on the market. New products appeared in both groups of insulin sensitizers and insulin secretagogues. Modern insulin secretagogues are characterized by immediate and short action. As a consequence, insulin secretion will approach the physiological secretory pattern. The rapid, short-term insulin output prevents the abnormal increase of postprandial glucose level and - at the same time - the danger of late hypoglycemia will decrease. The combination of insulin sensitizers with the new insulin secretagogues provides the possibility to apply the basisbolus therapeutical principle to type 2 diabetic patients treated with oral agents.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Consensus or chaos?]

GRÉTSY Zsombor

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Postgraduate training for diabetologists - Report]

GYIMESI András

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[History of Doctors’ Circle]

KAPRONCZAY Károly

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[The Great Acceleration]

BRYS Zoltán

Clinical Neuroscience

Validation of the Hungarian PHQ-15. A latent variable approach

STAUDER Adrienne, WITTHÖFT Michael, KÖTELES Ferenc

Somatic symptoms without a clear-cut organic or biomedical background, also called “medically unexplained” or “somatoform” symptoms, are frequent in primary and secondary health care. They are often accompanied by depression and/or anxiety, and cause functional impairment. The Patient Health Question­naire Somatic Symptom Scale (PHQ-15) was developed to measure somatic symptom distress based on the frequency and bothersomeness of non-specific somatic symptoms. The study aimed to (1) evaluate the Hungarian version of the PHQ-15 from a psychometric point of view; (2) replicate the bifactor structure and associations with negative affect described in the literature; and (3) provide the Hungarian clinical and scientific community with reference (normal) values split by sex and age groups. PHQ-15, depression (BDI-R), and subjective well-being (WHO-5) scores obtained from a large (n = 5020) and close to representative community sample (Hun­garostudy 2006) were subjected to correlation analysis and linear structural equation modeling. The PHQ-15 showed good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.810; McDonald’s ω = 0.819) and moderate to strong correlation with the BDI-R (rs = .49, p < 0.001) and WHO-5 (rs = -.48, p < 0.001). Fit of the bifactor structure was excellent; in independent analyses, the general factor was strongly associated with depression (β = 0.656±0.017, p < 0.001) and well-being (β = -0.575±0.015, p < 0.001), whereas the symptom specific factors were only weakly or not related to these constructs. The PHQ-15 score was higher in females and showed a weak positive association with age. The Hungarian PHQ-15 is a psychometrically sound scale which is positively associated with depression and ne­gatively related to subjective well-being. The bifactor structure indicates the existence and meaningfulness of a gene­ral factor representing the affective-motivational component of somatic symptom distress. The Hungarian version of the PHQ-15 is a brief and usable tool for the pre-screening of somatization disorder (DSM-IV) or somatic symptom disorder (DSM-5). The reported reference values can be used in the future for both clinical and research purposes.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Disease burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and their caregivers]

PÉNTEK Márta, HERCZEGFALVI Ágnes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit, SZŐNYI László Pál, KOSZTOLÁNYI György, PFLIEGLER György, MELEGH Béla, BONCZ Imre, BRODSZKY Valentin, BAJI Petra, SZEGEDI Márta, POGÁNY Gábor, GULÁCSI László

[Background and purpose - Data on the disease burden of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy are scarce in Hungary. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ and their caregivers’ health related quality of life and healthcare utilisations. Methods - A cross sectional survey was performed as part of the European BURQOL-RD project. The EQ-5D-5L and Barthel Index questionnaires were applied, health care utilisations and patients’ informal carers were surveyed. Results - One symptomatic female carer, 50 children (boys 94%) and six adult patients (five males) participated in the study, the latter two subgroups were included in the analysis. The average age was 9.7 (SD=4.6) and 24.3 (SD=9.8) years, respectively. Median age at time of diagnosis was three years. The average EQ-5D score among children and adults was 0.198 (SD=0.417) and 0.244 (SD=0.322), respectively, the Barthel Index was 57.6 (SD=29.9) and 53.0 (SD=36.5). Score of satisfaction with healthcare (10-point Likert-scale) was mean 5.3 (SD=2.1) and 5.3 (SD=2.9). 15 children were hospitalised in the past 12 months for mean 12.9 (SD=24.5) days. Two patients received help from professional carer. 25 children (mean age 11.1, SD=4.4 years) were helped/supervisied by principal informal carer (parent) for mean 90.1 (SD=44.4) hours/week and further family members helped in 21 cases. Correlation between EQ-5D and Barthel Index was strong and significant (0.731; p<0.01) as well as with informal care time (-0.770; p<0.01), but correlation with satisfaction with health care was not significant (EQ-5D: 0.241; Barthel Index: 0.219; informal care: -0.142). Conclusion - Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to a significant deterioration in the quality of life of patients. Parents play outstanding role in the care of affected children. This study is the first in the Central and Eastern European region that provides quality of life data in this rare disease for further health economic studies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy - three Hungarian cases with rare mutations (His88Arg and Phe33Leu)]

CSILLIK Anita, POZSONYI Zoltán, SOÓS Krisztina, BALOGH István, BODÓ Imre, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna

[Introduction - Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy is a rare autosomal dominant progressive systemic disesase of adults caused by endoneural amyloid deposition due to point mutations of the transthyretin gene. It is the most severe form among hereditary polyneuropathies, being fatal within 10 years if left untreated. The disease is underdiagnosed, the late onset forms (above the age of 50) being probably more widespread than previously thought. Early diagnosis is essential as the early introduction of causal therapy (tafamidis) slows progression and prolongs survival. Patients - We report here three non-related Hungarian cases of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy with non- Val30Met mutations (His88Arg in two cases, Phe33Leu in one case). They were all characterized by late-onset, progressive, length-dependent, axonal, sensorimotor polyneuropathy and the simultaneous presentation of severe restrictive cardiomyopathy. In all three cases, clinical and electrophysiological signs of myopathy were also present, suggesting the involvement of skeletal muscles as well. In two cases, high resolution ultrasound of the peripheral nerves was also performed, which showed segmental structural alterations (change or loss of fascicular structure) and some increase of echogenicity of the interfascicular epineurium, without substantial enlargement of the nerves. Conclusion - In Hungary, mainly the rare, non-Val30Met mutation forms of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy are encountered, as in our cases. As opposed to the Val30Met forms, these mutations are characterized by late onset and simultaneous presentation of severe cardiomyopathy. Our report highlights the importance of considering transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy in the differential diagnosis of late-onset, progressive, axonal polyneuropathies of unknown etiology, particularly if associated with cardiac disease.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Epilepsy in coronavirus pandemic]

SZŰCS Anna, HALÁSZ Péter, NARULA Lalit

[We aim to review the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on epilepsy and epilepsy-care. While the virus has no specific link with epilepsy, it may affect the nervous system both directly and indirectly, leading to seizures in several ways. The hyper-coagulable state occurring with the infection may cause strokes leading to seizures. The infection may first manifest in the form of disturbances of consciousness and behaviour, seizures, and even status epilepticus. The interactions of antiviral/antiepileptic drugs need to be taken into account during treatment. The hypercoagulable state induced by COVID-2 infection may cause stroke, which leads to seizures. The infection can occur also as an impaired consciousness of non-epileptic origin. Interactions of antiviral/antiepileptic drugs have also to be taken into account. The pandemic itself as well as quarantines and social distancing may cause anxiety and insomnia, challenge continuous antiepileptic supply; each one carrying the risk of seizing. Young epilepsy patients with learning disabilities and mental health issues are most vulnerable, justifying their hyper-protection. The danger of infection has highlighted the role of telemedicine. Internet-based video communication may ensure full care for chro­nic patients. Those methods favour bes­­ted patients with higher education. Epilepsy does not increase directly the risk of infection, but its comorbidities may worsen the course of the disease. Brain lesions and hypoxia, stress, insomnia and fever joining the infection increase seizure susceptibility. Because the danger of infection ma­de telemedicine an essential tool of pa­tient care, education and better computer supply for those in need is crucial. ]