Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE PRESENT STATE AND CURRENT PROBLEMS OF HUNGARIAN PSYCHIATRY]

TÚRY Ferenc, HARMATTA János

OCTOBER 18, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(10)

[The changes in attitude that occurred in general medicine 2 to 3 decades ago had a fundamental impact on psychiatry by giving it a greater emphasis due to the wider acceptance of the bio-psycho-social model. In parallel with this change an English-speaking professional dominance took over the former German-French traditions. Hungarian psychiatrists keep pace with the development of psychiatry, with remarkable achievements in some areas. In everyday patient care and clinical practice, however, severe difficulties are encountered. The paper reviews the trends in practice, education, research, and also the development of professional organizations. Certain ethical implications of the sociocultural changes and future trends of national psychiatry are also summarized.]

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