Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE LONG ACTING INSULIN ANALOGUE DETEMIR IN THE DIABETOLOGICAL PRACTICE: EVIDENCE AND POTENTIALS]

TAMÁS GYULA1,2, KERÉNYI ZSUZSA1,3

APRIL 21, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(04)

[Insulin detemir is a neutral, soluble, long-acting insulin analogue in which the amino acid threonineB30 has been removed and the LysB29 acylated with a 14-carbon fatty acid. The fatty acid modification allows insulin detemir to dihexamerisate and reversibly bind to human albumin upon administration. This brand new principle (self association and albumin binding) ensures slow absorption and a prolonged and consistent metabolic effect without a marked peak for up to 24 hours in patients both with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results of large clinical trials have shown that detemir can be efficiently used as basal insulin, supplemented with human regular insulin or aspart insulin taken before the main meals, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Available data clearly demonstrate that the use of this insulin is associated with decreased variability of the fasting blood glucose values. In some of the studies the risk of (mostly nocturnal) hypoglycaemic episodes also dropped. It is important to note that patients using insulin detemir gained less or no weight compared to the group of patients treated with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin. Evaluation of long-term and wide-spread application of detemir needs further observations. Such trials are being conducted worldwide.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Diabétesz Gondozási Nemzeti Központ
  2. Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, I. Sz. Belgyógyászati Klinika, Diabétesz Részleg
  3. Csepeli Egészségügyi Szolgálat, Diabetológia

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