Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Janus-faced Princess, or the Secret of Ghosts Emerging from the Depth of the Soul ]

GEREVICH József

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2018;28(08-09)

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[Differential diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia]

NÉMETH Zsófia, DEÁK György

[Hyponatraemia (serum sodium concentration < 136 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality that inceases the risk of both in-hospital, and outpatient mortality. Antidiuretic hormone action or low glomerular fitration rate or low excretable osmoles or their combination are involved in its pathogenesis. Differential diagnosis is based on medical and medication histories, serum- and urine osmolality and urine sodium concentration. Measurement of fractional excretions of urea and uric acid help identifying low effective circulting volume, renal hypoperfusion. Symptomatic hyponatraemia or an acute decrease of serum sodium concentration exceeding 10 mmol/l should be treated with 3% NaCl to avoid impending threat to life. The principles of the treatment of chronic hyponatraemia are restriction of water intake and elimination of etiologic factor(s) (eg. medications - most often thiazides). In case of contracted axtracellular volume, isotonic saline should be given. In case of euvolaemia, restriciton of water intake is fundamental. In case of expanded extracellular volume, (heart failure, liver cirrhosis, nephrosis), water and NaCl intake should be restricted along with aldosteron antagonist and loop diuretic therapy. In chronic hyponatraemia, the rise of serum sodium concentration should not exceed 10 mmol/l during the first 24 hours and 8 mmol/l/day thereafter. ]

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[A short chronicle of three decades ]

KAPRONCZAY Katalin

[Hungarian professional periodicals started quite late in European context. Their publish­ing, editing and editorial philosophy were equally influenced by specific historical and political situations. Certain breaking points of history resulted in termina­tion of professional journals (War of In­de­pendence 1848-1849, First and Se­cond World Wars), however there were pe­riods, which instigated the progress of sciences and founding of new scientific journals. Both trends were apparent in years after the fall of former Hungarian regime in 1990. The structure of book and journal publishing has changed substantially, some publishers fell “victim” others started successfully as well. The latters include the then-established publishing house Literatura Medica and its own scientific journal, Lege Artis Me­di­cinae (according to its subtitle: New Hun­garian Medical Herald) issued first in 1990. Its appearance enhanced significantly the medical press market. Its scientific publications compete with articles of the well-established domestic medical journals however its philosophy set brand-new trends on the market. Concerning the medical community, it takes on its problems and provides a forum for them. These problems are emerging questions in health care, economy and prevention, in close interrelation with system of public health institutions, infrastructure and situation of those providing individual health services. In all of them, Lege Artis Medicinae follows consequently the ideas of traditional social medicine.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[Changes in infectology over the past two decades]

SZALKA András

[Infectious diseases and various infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developing as well as in industrialised countries. Despite the advances in the past decades in our understanding of microbes, efficient treatment of diseases and preventive approaches, more than 13 million people die every year due to infectious diseases. In the past two decades, more and more new pathogens and infections diseases have been emerging and old diseases that were almost forgotten have re-emerged. There are many new diseases for which we do not have or have hardly any efficient antimicrobial drugs and no efficient vaccines. Despite an increasing frequency of multi- and panresistant microbes, the development of new antibiotics to be used against these infections is unlikely to occur in the near future. The big pharmaceutical companies have stopped the research of antibiotics. In this situation, the only option we have is to use antibiotics rationally and to take prevention and control of infections seriously, both in the outpatient system and in hospitals. Preserving the effectiveness of currently used antibiotics is in everyone’s interest and is everyone’s responsibility]

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[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Clinical Oncology

[Actual place and role of communication in Hungarian oncology]

MUSZBEK Katalin, GAAL Ilona

[The move to shared decision model from the patriarchal model of doctor-patient relationship is a communication challenge for doctors and patients as well. Communication is extremely important in Oncology, because the suggestive effect of every action of doctors and nurses is outstanding in this fi eld of healthcare. This burden has to urge professionals to self-improvement. One of the most important success of the Doctor-Patient Relationship program of the Hungarian Hospice Foundation since its launch in 2014 is the statement of two clinical centres on the importance of communication skills in everyday praxis, and engaging themselves in self-improvement. The successful cooperation also depends on patients and their care-givers not just on professionals. To gain all the necessary information is a learning process for them; even as to fi nd out the depth of information and decision level they wish. The patient who is satisfied with his or her own communication in healthcare is less distressed than the one who feels like adrifting. That gives the sense of achievement to professionals as well.]

Clinical Oncology

[How to evaluate clinical trials?]

TORDAY László, VÉGH Éva

[Data from a clinical study should be always viewed with great care, and is recommended to examine and evaluate the data in-depth. First of all should be determined the evidence level of the trial’s results and what recommendations can be made based on them. The study’s type and the study design, the number of participating patients, statistical power, randomisation, stratifi cation, the balance between study arms, the endpoints and the adequacy of follow-up time should be examined. In addition the importance of the observed statistical signifi cance, the clinical relevance of the data and the real magnitude of the detected differences, and the time-dependent variables are worth to consider because these factors can determine the impact of the given clinical trial on the every-day clinical practice. In the era of the “creative study plans” a critical attitude is necessary to be convinced that the study does not contain any typical bias that could infl uence the real value and actual results of the trial.]