Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Identity of Psychiatrists – a Criticism of Psychiatry by Thomas Szasz]

KELEMEN Gábor

SEPTEMBER 20, 2010

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2010;20(09)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Laymen’s Gymnastics Movement – Establishment of the National Gymnastics Club]

KÖLNEI Lívia

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[Gustav Klimt and the Early Viennese Secession, 1895-1905]

NEMESI Zsuzsanna

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[How Psychiatrists Relate to Pharmaceutical Industry Companies – Part of the Problem or the Solution?]

THOMAS R. Insel

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[Reform of the Hungarian health care - Where are we now?]

LANTOS Zoltán

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Incretin based therapies from a clinician’s view]

KIS János Tibor

[The incretin based therapies give new and promising opportunities in the care of type 2 diabetic patients. Right now two kinds of incretinmimetics and three incretinenhancers are available in Hungary. There are more and more agents and more industrial products. There are several publications about the advantages of these products, but only a few data can be found about the comparison of them. The author tries to evaluate the incretin based therapies, and tries to help the clinicians choose the right one.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

The etiology and age-related properties of patients with delirium in coronary intensive care unit and its effects on inhospital and follow up prognosis

ALTAY Servet, GÜRDOGAN Muhammet, KAYA Caglar, KARDAS Fatih, ZEYBEY Utku, CAKIR Burcu, EBIK Mustafa, DEMIR Melik

Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[History of Daytime Hospital of the Department of Psychiatry in the University of Debrecen ]

ÉGERHÁZI Anikó, CSERÉP Edina, MAGYAR Erzsébet

[In Hungary, there was a ward related psychotherapy already since the 1960s, yet without any national network to the 1980s. In Debrecen the spreading of the psychotherapeutic approach started in the psychiatric facilities since the 1990s. Daytime Hospital was founded first in the County Hospital and later on in the Department of Psychiatry of the University. The latter option was provided by separating the psychiatry from neurology. This study presents the development of the day care at the Psychiatric Department along the opportunities and shows the structure of the actually functioning system finally reports on our future plans respectively. Initially started the occupational therapy, gymnastics, community cooking and walking, which did not require any separate rooms. The 22-bed psychotherapeutic unit was established 2014 with its joined capacity for 11 persons in the Daytime Hospital. The County Hospital is engaged primarily in socio-therapy of psychotic psychiatry pa­tients, however the Psychiatric Department is rehabilitating mainly patients with affective spectrum disorders. Patients are treated in socio-therapy and psychotherapy small groups for a half or one year. Afterward they enter the outpatient program, may join the Patient Club or decide for therapeutic occupation aiming the best way of recovery. According to the feedback, there is a long-term change in the mental state of the patients leading to improvement in their quality of life, which we plan to prove by an efficacy research program. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurophobia]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Neurophobia is the fear of neurological diseases. Its main symptom is that medical students and young doctors are not able to utilize their basic neurological knowledge at the bedside. According to statistics, every second student suffers from neurophobia. This attitude could explain why in the last two decades less and less young doctors wanted to become neurologist. Medical students complain that they receive no instructions, and are afraid of loosing their interest and of facing the failure of their competency. The hardship of neurology was explained by the insufficient knowledge of anatomy and the infrequent encounter with patients. Even general practitioners have anxiety about neurological patients. The loss of interest in neurosciences seems to associate with insensitivity of human-centered culture and corruption of empathic thinking. The burnout syndrome of medical doctors and students can be explained by stress, loss of respect, permanent competition, independency that interferes with responsibility, stiff hierarchy of medical society, fear of diagnostic failures and of economical difficulties. The scores of depression in female students were higher than in male. The idea of the “good neurologist” has been changed. The business oriented care, the shortage of time, and the financial restrictions corroded the conventional practice and ceased the vocational idealism. At present, personal teaching is going to transform into impersonal multimedia learning. Because of the drastic change of values, the age of inner-oriented professionals has terminated also in the medicine. Medical doctors follow even less the traditional troll of professional behavior, but according the social demands, they choose their specialization for subsistence. The highly esteemed social status of neurologists and psychiatrists is going to sink in Europe. To reduce neurophobia it would be desirable 1. to introduce neurology training in the early years of medical school; 2. to teach neurology in all semesters, 3. to assure the effective teaching of neuro-anatomy and physiology, 4. to organize more one-to-one teacher-student communication. In the United States, residents participate in teaching during their residency training. To master neurology dedicated teachers are necessary whom neurology residents ought to meet personally with optimal frequency. However, these requirements seem to fail because of the chiefly technical characters of the actual reforms.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Depression in medical practice - the possibilities of diagnosis and treatment]

OSVÁTH Péter

[Nowadays, there is an increasing incidence of depressive mood disorders, so we have more and more depressed patients in everyday clinical practice. Unfortunately, in many cases, this is not recognized and thus the treatment of depressed patients is not adequately addressed. Untreated depression not only increases the burden of the patient and his environment, but leads to serious and dangerous psychic and somatic complications. However, with modern and complex psychopharmacological, psychotherapeutic and sociotherapeutic methods, depressive mood disorders can be effectively treated. In this paper I review the etiologic background, the characteristics of depressive mood disorders and the most important steps of making diagnosis, as well as the state of the art therapeutic options. Rapid recognition and effective treatment of depressive symptoms has important therapeutic and preventive significance, so today, besides psychiatrists, there is an increasing role for general practitioners and other specialists (internists, neurologists, etc.).]