Lege Artis Medicinae

[The effect of chronic stress on defense mechanisms chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis]

MOLNÁR Ildikó

JANUARY 20, 2010

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2010;20(01)

[During stress, the activation of the hypothalamus- pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic, sensory nervous system leads to an increased production of glucocorticoids, catecholamines and other active peptides. The specific receptors on immunocompetent and tissue cells for glucocorticoid, corticotropin-releasing hormone and histamine, substance-P, norepinephrine, calcitonin gene-related peptide can modify the cytokine production of macrophages, lymphocytes and tissue cells. Local hormonal effects have a role in the degranulation of mast cells and thus in histamine release and neurogenic inflammation. Long-term, chronic inflammations promote carcinogenesis, in which the tumourassociated macrophages have an important role. Carcinogenesis is associated with disturbed cooperation between the neuronal immune and endocrine systems.]

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