Lege Artis Medicinae

[Risk to the fetus in the light of new data]

BODA Domokos

SEPTEMBER 10, 2001

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2001;11(08-09)

[Extensive research efforts based on principles of evidence-based medicine have helped lately to accumulate large amount of information on the risks to the fetus during pregnancy. As a result, the standpoints concerning risks to the fetus have become more precise in many respects. A number of earlier assumptions have been proven to be exaggerated or unfounded and the range of cases at risk has been narrowed down. This paper presents the most important data on potential risks to the fetus originating from hereditary factors, infections, maternal diseases, drugs, irradiation and special gestational anomalies. The data presented highlight the necessity of identifying the fetal damage during the pregnancy unequivocally, based exclusively on evidence of probative force and with realistic appraisal of the danger of any existent fetal damage.]

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