Lege Artis Medicinae

[Results and perspective of gene therapy in the treatment of primary immunodeficiency]

SÓFI Gyula1, MARÓDI László1

OCTOBER 28, 1992

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1992;2(10)

[During the last decade research has been directed toward gene-replacement therapy of genetic disorders, including primary immunodeficiencies. Efficient methods for gene transfer were developed to correct the gene defect in adenosine desaminase deficiency, leukocyte adhesion deficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Somatic gene therapy in a patient with ADA deficiency was performed two years ago. This paper summaries inicial clinical applications of gene transfer and gene therapy in primary immunodeficiency and the future prospects of gene therapy in cohort of patients. ]

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  1. Debreceni Orvostudományi Egyetem Gyermekgyógyászati Klinika

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