Lege Artis Medicinae

[Primary haemostasis in atherothrombotic processes]

UDVARDY Miklós

JULY 10, 2001

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2001;11(06-07)

[It is now generally accepted, that the majority (>90%) of acute coronary and carotid syndromes are caused by thrombosis secondary to atheromatous plaque disruption, and approximately 75% of stroke cases are also of thrombotic origin. The prothrombotic changes in blood coagulation and in the primary haemostatic system may contribute substantially to the risk of occlusive arterial thrombotic events. The imbalance in the endothelium-platelet interaction seems to play crucial role in vessel wall response to injuries. Careful and complex analysis of platelet and clotting alterations may result in better understanding of arterial thrombotic processes and also in greater success of primary and secondary prevention by accelerating the development of better antithrombotic drugs.]

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