Lege Artis Medicinae

[Prevention of invasive meningococcal infection, recognition and first treatment of the disease in primary care]

KOVÁCS Ákos, KULCSÁR Andrea, KALABAY László, TORZSA Péter

MAY 20, 2017

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2017;27(04-05)

[In this article, based on a short case report, the authors summarise what you must do and must not do as a primary care physician when suddenly meeting a young patient suspected of having meningococcus infection. Neisseria meningitidis, the meningococcus, is a Gram-negative diplococcal bacterium that is only found naturally in humans. The meningococcus is part of the normal microbiota of the human nasopha-rynx and is commonly carried in healthy individuals. In some cases systemic invasion occurs, which can lead to meningitis and/or septicemia. Invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis is potentially de­vastating, with a high case fatality rate and high rates of significant sequelae among survivors after septicaemia or meningitis. Between 2006 and 2015 every year there were 34 to 70 cases of the registered invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis, the morbidity rate being 0.02-0.07‱. Half of the diseases (50.7%) were caused by serotype B N. meningitidis, 23.2% were serotype C. ]

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