Lege Artis Medicinae

[Performance funding: dream or reality? Part II]

AJKAY Zoltán1

JANUARY 31, 1994

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1994;4(01)

[Within the institutions, the transition to the new funding system creates a completely new situation. At the same time as the contracts were signed, the inpatient institutions also received the first data on the number and proportion of HBCS cases in each unit, ward or department in the month. This created a database for the analysis of inpatient morbidity in institutions, a continuous possibility to identify the underlying causes of cost overruns and to make comparisons within institutions. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Országos Korányi Tbc és Pulmonológiai Intézet

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Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Influence of alcohol on the nervous system]

BARACZKA Krisztina

[Prevention and treatment of addictions such as alcoholism require a multidisciplinary approach. Sociological and social psychiatric studies have revealed many factors which may play a part in the development of alcoholism, however biological studies increasingly indicate an organic origin of alcoholism. The aim of the present comprehensive study was to summarise the clinical manifestations of alcohol toxicity based on biological alterations. The results of genetic and immunological studies are summarized. Some aspects of the investigations in the field of biogenic amines are presented. The primary toxic, long lasting withdrawal effects are discussed, from the clinical point of view.]

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[Contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging in clinical practice]

FÁBIÁN Lajos

[The author's main goal is to introduce the generally available contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging. After a brief survey of this topic, the principal agents are classified into three main subgroups. The four Ti-type contrast agents are compared and discussed on the basis of the available data in the literature. Finally, the possible future direction of contrast media research in MRI is discussed. ]

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[Correspondence - The doctor's relationship with patients]

RÁCZ Egon

[It's been a decade since I read in a Hungarian medical journal about the doctor's behaviour, his attitude, his relationship with the patient, his colleagues, his co-workers. Based on my decades of medical practice (and my frequent illness - which has only prevented me from practising my profession in the last two years), I will try to summarise what the patient's expectations of the doctor are, and how well the doctor can meet them.]

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[The present and future of radiology]

HARKÁNYI Zoltán

[Conversation with Professors Charles Gooding and Gretchen Gooding]

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[EEG mapping in focal cerebral disorders]

NIKL János, KUKOR Gyula

[EEG mapping is a new method which serves for processing the data of the quantitative analysis of the brain electrical activity. In its final form it is a neuroimaging technique. The present study was designed to examine the localization reliability and clinical utilization of the mapping. 103 patients with focal cerebral disorders were investigated: 70 patients with cerebrovascular diseases, 33 patients with tumour, epilepsy, migraine, meningoencephalitis, subdural haematoma, subarachnoid cyst. The EEG mapping, the routine EEG and the CT were performed and their findings were compared. In comparison with the traditional EEG, the mapping has the advantage that it can detect the alpha asymmetry. It shows the focal, functional damages more correctly than the EEG does. The mapping provides information about the ischemic lesions before the CT can visualize the tissue hypodensity. In comparison with the CT, the mapping has a good localization reliability although there are some sources of error in the method. It can detect minimal cerebral damages. It is applicable for follow-up studies on transient ischemic attacks. ]

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We aimed to investigate the association between fluoxetine use and the survival of hospitalised coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia patients. This retrospective case-control study used data extracted from the medical records of adult patients hospitalised with moderate or severe COVID-19 pneumonia at the Uzsoki Teaching Hospital of the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary between 17 March and 22 April 2021. As a part of standard medical treatment, patients received anti-COVID-19 therapies as favipiravir, remdesivir, baricitinib or a combination of these drugs; and 110 of them received 20 mg fluoxetine capsules once daily as an adjuvant medication. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between fluoxetine use and mortality. For excluding a fluoxetine-selection bias potentially influencing our results, we compared baseline prognostic markers in the two groups treated versus not treated with fluoxetine. Out of the 269 participants, 205 (76.2%) survived and 64 (23.8%) died between days 2 and 28 after hospitalisation. Greater age (OR [95% CI] 1.08 [1.05–1.11], p<0.001), radiographic severity based on chest X-ray (OR [95% CI] 2.03 [1.27–3.25], p=0.003) and higher score of shortened National Early Warning Score (sNEWS) (OR [95% CI] 1.20 [1.01-1.43], p=0.04) were associated with higher mortality. Fluoxetine use was associated with an important (70%) decrease of mortality (OR [95% CI] 0.33 [0.16–0.68], p=0.002) compared to the non-fluoxetine group. Age, gender, LDH, CRP, and D-dimer levels, sNEWS, Chest X-ray score did not show statistical difference between the fluoxetine and non-fluoxetine groups supporting the reliability of our finding. Provisional to confirmation in randomised controlled studies, fluoxetine may be a potent treatment increasing the survival for COVID-19 pneumonia.

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Alexithymia is associated with cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson’s disease

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Cognitive dysfunction (CD) is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Alexithy­mia is a still poorly understood neuropsychiatric feature of PD. Cognitive impairment (especially visuospatial dysfunction and executive dysfunction) and alexithymia share com­mon pathology of neuroanatomical structures. We hypo­thesized that there must be a correlation between CD and alexithymia levels considering this relationship of neuroanatomy. Objective – The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between alexithymia and neurocognitive function in patients with PD. Thirty-five patients with PD were included in this study. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale–20 (TAS-20), Geriatric Depression Inventory (GDI) and a detailed neuropsychological evaluation were performed. Higher TAS-20 scores were negatively correlated with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) similarities test score (r =-0.71, p value 0.02), clock drawing test (CDT) scores (r=-0.72, p=0.02) and verbal fluency (VF) (r=-0.77, p<0.01). Difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was negatively correlated with CDT scores (r=-0.74, p=0.02), VF scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04), visual memory immediate recall (r=-0.74, p=0.01). VF scores were also correlated with difficulty describing feelings (DDF) scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04). There was a reverse relationship bet­ween WAIS similarities and DDF scores (r=-0.70, p=0.02), and externally oriented-thinking (r=-0.77,p<0.01). Executive function Z score was correlated with the mean TAS-20 score (r=-62, p=0.03) and DDF subscale score (r=-0.70, p=0.01) Alexithymia was found to be associated with poorer performance on visuospatial and executive function test results. We also found that alexithymia was significantly correlated with depressive symptoms. Presence of alexithymia should therefore warn the clinicians for co-existing CD.

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[The importance of patient reported outcome measures in Pompe disease]

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