Lege Artis Medicinae

[Oral carcinoma and its preblastomatoses: the role of papillomavirus infection and the prospects of early diagnosis]

DECSI Gábor, TARNAI Zsófia, ZSEDÉNYI Ádám, BUZÁS Krisztina, NAGY Katalin, SONKODI István, MINÁROVITS János

MARCH 20, 2014

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2014;24(03)

[The high incidence of oral carcinoma in Hungary is attributed primarily to tobacco and alcohol use. Recently, however, a series of publications suggested a role for humán papillomavirus in the development of oral carcinoma. For this reason we reviewed the literature regarding the associations of human papillomavirus with oral carcinoma and its preblastomatoses. We also overviewed research aiming to develop reliable methods for early diagnosis that are also suitable for screening. Early diagnosis and treatment may significantly improve the prospects of the patient. In addition, the addition of already available human papilloma virus vaccines into national vaccination programs and the extension of vaccination for both sexes may decrease the prevalence of oral carcinoma associated with human papillomavirus infection that primarily affects younger populations.]

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