Lege Artis Medicinae

[NEW WAYS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS IN HUNGARY]

GERGELY Péter, POÓR Gyula

OCTOBER 21, 2007

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2007;17(10)

[Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune rheumatic condition of unknown origin. Due to its high prevalence, incompletely solved therapy, significant impact on mortality and morbidity, and the psychological and economic burden it puts on the patient, family and society, rheumatoid arthritis has a major public health significance. Although its importance is still underestimated both by the public and the medical community, today an improving tendency can be observed. The past decade has seen important breakthroughs in terms of increased recognition of the significance of the disease, as well as in its pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy. The introduction of new diagnostic and prognostic markers and early aggressive treatment, the establishment of early arthritis clinics, and, most importantly, the successful use of biological therapy have revolutionized the management of rheumatoid arthritis. The paper reviews the modern therapy of the disease, touching on the options available in Hungary.]

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