Lege Artis Medicinae

[Netherlands-Netherlands]

OCTOBER 30, 1991

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1991;1(16)

[This summer, thanks to a Tempus scholarship, I was able to spend a good part of my summer at the Free University of Amsterdam. Medical training there is in many ways different from that at home, more liberal and broader. I thought it was important to publish some of its characteristics, so that everyone can think about them as they wish.]

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[Problems of organ transplantation - donor care]

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