Lege Artis Medicinae

[Mummy – A Miraculous Drug Used for Millennia]

BECHER Péter, PATAI Árpád, MÁJER Katalin

MARCH 22, 2012

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2012;22(03)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[What is the doctor like, if female? - Female doctors’ ideal image based on empirical studies]

MOLNÁR Regina, GIRASEK Edmond, CSINÁDY Adriána, BUGÁN Antal

[The aim of our study was to examine thestereotypes about female doctors and howdo the female medical students perceivethe working female doctors whom are theirrole models. In the first study (247 from theAlbert Szent-Györgyi Medical and Pharma-ceutical Centre at the University of Szegedand 256 from the Medical and HealthScience Centre of the University ofDebrecen) the female medical students’professional socialization was compared tothe male counterparts’. In the second study(from University of Szeged, 214 femalemedical students, 132 female jurist stu-dents) female medical and jurist students'professional socialization was comparedincluding the comparison of stereotypes inconnection with working female doctorsand jurists. Female medical students’ professionalsocialization is different that of male coun-terparts in several aspects: being morealtruistic, more family centered, gettingcommited to the profession earlier, havingmore ambiguous carrier planes, and asmaller percentage of their parents’ has adegree or is a medical doctor, then for malemedical students. The female medical doc-tor has positive, idealistic, altruistic charac-ters according to both female studentgroups’ opinions. The female doctor’simage is more often associated with char-actersitics implying problems by femalemedical students then jurists. The unfold-ing image of these stereotypes is a femaledoctor who is willing to help, however,faceing lots of hardnesses during work.If the female medical students’ image of theproblematic life of these idealistic femaledoctors’ is known, it provides an opportu-nity to prepare them for the hardnessesthey’ll face avoiding role conflicts andhealth problems in the future.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The new British recommendations for the treatment of lower back pain on the basis of the new NICE guidelines - comparison with the Hungarian therapeutic practice]

VERECKEI Edit, PALKONYAI Éva, SIMONCSICS Eszter, APÁTHY Ágnes, TEMESVÁRI I. Péter

[The new NICE guidelines on lower back pain emphasise the importance of clinical assessment. Radiological imaging methods are used primarily to exclude severe diseases, such as tumour, infection, trauma or inflammation. It’s crucial to inform patients and encourage them to use self-management and stay active. Pain management is guided by the analgesic ladder. A complex physical and psychological treatment is used, which involves a structured exercise programme, manual therapy and acupuncture, taking into account the preferences of the patient. Depending on the aetiology, surgical intervention should be considered in therapy-resistant cases. Finally, the authors compare the above guidelines with the Hungarian practice in this field.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The History of Research on Human Subjects and its Regulations from an Ethics Perspective]

KOVÁCS József

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Xerostomy - about the background of an unpleasant symptome]

GERLINGER Imre

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Bacterial contamination and irritable bowel syndrome]

NOVÁK János

[Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal condition, which affects 10-15% of adults in developed countries. Recent observations have raised the possibility that disturbances in the gut microbiota and/or the accompanying low-grade inflammatory state might contribute to the etiology and symptomatology of irritable bowel syndrome. Some studies indicate that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), as confirmed by hydrogen breath tests (HBT), is more prevalent in patients with irritable bowel syndrome than in matched controls without IBS. Although the data are conflicting, this observation has led to the hypothesis that bacterial contamination was the primary cause of IBS. As a consequence of this hypothesis, a lot of therapeutic options have found their way into the armamentarium of those who treat patients with IBS. These agents include probiotics, prebiotics, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents. This paper describes the various mechanisms by which changes in the gut flora might contribute to IBS and also discusses the efficacy and safety of antibiotic therapies, especially rifaximin, for treating IBS/SIBO symptoms.]

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[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

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MAHMUT Atum, ERKAN Çelik, GÜRSOY Alagöz

Introduction - Our aim is to present a rare case where a child had delirium manifestation after instillation of cyclopentolate. Case presentation - A 7-year old patient was seen in our outpatient clinic, and cyclopentolate was dropped three times at 10 minutes intervals in both eyes. The patient suddenly developed behavioral disorders along with gait disturbance, and complained of visual hallucinations 20-25 minutes after the last drop. The patient was transferred to intensive care unit and 0.02 mg/kg IV. physostigmine was administered. The patient improved after minutes of onset of physostigmine, and was discharged with total recovery after 30 minutes. Conclusion - Delirium is a rare systemic side effect of cyclopentolate. The specific antidote is physostigmine, which can be used in severely agitated patients who are not responding to other therapies.

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Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing/short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with cranial autonomic features (SUNCT/SUNA) is a rare severe headache. At the time of an attack, it can hinder a patient from eating and requires acute intervention. The sphenopalatine ganglion is an extracranial parasympathetic ganglion with both sensory and autonomic fibers. Sphenopalatine ganglion block has long been used in the treatment of headache, particularly when conventional methods have failed. Here, we present a patient who was resistant to intravenous lidocaine, but responded rapidly to sphenopalatine ganglion block during an acute episode of SUNCT/SUNA.

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[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

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[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]