Lege Artis Medicinae

[MEDICINAL HERBS IN THE TREATMENT OF LIVER DISEASES]

SCHULLER János

MAY 21, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(05)

[Today, alternative medicine is increasingly popular among patients. Patients with liver diseases surprisingly often use complementary treatment, mainly medicinal herbs, with or without the knowledge of their physician. This is one of the reasons why doctors may not ignore alternative medicine. Another reason is that twenty to thirty percent of medicaments now used in conventional therapy were originally produced from herbs. This means that some of the herbal medicines now applied in alternative therapy may become a conventional drug in the future. This paper reviews publications of evidencebased medicine on herbal medicines most often used in the treatment of liver diseases, including silymarin, glycyrrhizin, phyllantus amarus, CH- 100, LIV.52, sho-saiko-to, bin-gan, compund 861 and oxymatrine. It is important for physicians to be also knowledgeable about potentially hepatotoxic medicinal herbs.]

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