Lege Artis Medicinae

[Leaving Paradise – Or the Hidden Curative Effects of Pomegranate]

BECHER Péter, PATAI Árpád, MÁJER Katalin

FEBRUARY 20, 2011

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2011;21(02)

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Clinical Neuroscience

Electrophysiological investigation for autonomic dysfunction in patients with myasthenia gravis: A prospective study

NALBANTOGLU Mecbure, AKALIN Ali Mehmet, GUNDUZ Aysegul, KIZILTAN Meral

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of neuromuscular transmission. Autonomic dysfunction is not a commonly known association with MG. We conducted this study to evaluate autonomic functions in MG & subgroups and to investigate the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. This study comprised 30 autoimmune MG patients and 30 healthy volunteers. Autonomic tests including sympathetic skin response (SSR) and R-R interval variation analysis (RRIV) was carried out. The tests were performed two times for patients who were under acetylcholinesterase inhibitors during the current assessment. The RRIV rise during hyperventilation was better (p=0.006) and Valsalva ratio (p=0.039) was lower in control group. The SSR amplitudes were lower thereafter drug intake (p=0.030). As much as time went by after drug administration prolonged SSR latencies were obtained (p=0.043).Valsalva ratio was lower in the AchR antibody negative group (p=0.033). The findings showed that both ocular/generalized MG patients have a subclinical parasympathetic abnormality prominent in the AchR antibody negative group and pyridostigmine has a peripheral sympathetic cholinergic noncumulative effect.

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Vaccines against COVID-19 pandemic]

FALUS András, SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[The rapidly spreading SARS-CoV2 respiratory virus has evoked an epidemic with serious aftermath around the world. In addition to the health effects, the global economic damage is actually unpredictable. At the same time, the pandemic has launched a series of unprecedented collaborative scientific research, including the development of vaccines. This study summarizes up-to-date information on vaccines, immune memory, and some emerging clinical effects.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Risk of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Focus on aceclofenac]

FARSANG Csaba

[Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently used pharmaceuticals. Nevertheless, a number of studies emphasized that NSAIDs were damaging not only the gastrointestinal (GI), but also the cardiovascular (CV) system, could increase the blood pressure, the frequency of coronary events (angina, myocardial infarction) and stroke incidence, as well as they might deterio­rate renal functions. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) did not find evidence that administering NSAIDs could increase the risk of developing COVID-19 or worsened the condition of COVID-19 patients. However, unwanted effects of specific drugs differ substantially in their occurrence and seriousness as well. It seemed to be for a long time that the NSAIDs provoked higher GI-risk was closely related to the COX1/COX2 selectivity, like the cardiovascular (CV) risk to the COX2/COX1 selectivity, however, the recent data did not prove it clearly. Based on the available literature while pondering the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular adverse events, among all NSAIDs the aceclofenac profile seemed to be the most favourable.]

Clinical Neuroscience

A cross-sectional study on the quality of life in migraine and medication overuse headache in a Hungarian sample: understanding the effect of headache characteristics

MAGYAR Máté , KÖKÖNYEI Gyöngyi , BAKSA Dániel, GALAMBOS Attila, ÉDES Edit Andrea , SZABÓ Edina , KOCSEL Natália , GECSE Kinga , DOBOS Dóra , GYÜRE Tamás , JUHÁSZ Gabriella , ERTSEY Csaba

Previous studies using generic and disease specific instruments showed that both migraine and medication overuse headache are associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The aim of our study was to assess HRQoL differences in migraineurs and in patients with MOH and to examine how headache characteristics such as years with headache, aura symptoms, triptan use, headache pain severity and headache frequency are related to HRQoL. In this cross-sectional study 334 participants were examined (248 were recruited from a tertiary headache centre and 86 via advertisements). The Comp­rehensive Headache-related Quality of life Questionnaire (CHQQ) was used to measure the participants’ HRQoL. Data showed normal distribution, therefore beside Chi-squared test parametric tests (e.g. independent samples t-test) were used with a two-tailed p<0.05 threshold. Linear regression models were used to determine the independent effects of sex, age, recruitment method, headache type (migraine vs. MOH) and headache characteristics (presence of aura symptoms, years with headache, headache pain severity, headache frequency and triptan use) separately for each domain and for the total score of CHQQ. Significance threshold was adopted to p0.0125 (0.05/4) to correct for multiple testing and avoid Type I error. Independent samples t-tests showed that patients with MOH had significantly lower scores on all CHQQ domains than migraineurs, except on the social subscale. Results of a series of regression analyses showed that triptan use was inversely related to all the domains of HRQoL after correction for multiple testing (p<0.0125). In addition, headache pain severity was associated with lower physical (p=0.001) and total scores (p=0.002) on CHQQ subscales. Based on the results, different headache characteristics (but not the headache type, namely migraine or MOH) were associated with lower levels of HRQoL in patients with headache. Determining which factors play significant role in the deterioration of HRQoL is important to adequately manage different patient populations and to guide public health policies regarding health service utilization and health-care costs.