Lege Artis Medicinae

[LATE EFFECTS OF TREATMENT FOR DECREASING CARDIOVASCULAR RISK “CARDIOMETABOLIC THERAPEUTIC MEMORY” - A HYPOTHESIS]

JERMENDY György

JULY 14, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(06-07)

[In several randomised, controlled clinical studies conducted to decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, there was long-term observational follow-up after the termination of the double-blind phase. There is evidence that the beneficial effect of the therapeutic intervention in the active study phase was maintained in the follow-up period. This phenomenon was observed both for life-style modification and for pharmacological intervention, including the use of ACE-inhibitors, statins, fibrates and intensive insulin treatment. This fact suggests the possibility that even after several years, the body “remembers” the beneficial effects of the cardiovascular risk reduction achieved years earlier. The phenomenon may be called “cardiometabolic therapeutic memory”.]

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