Lege Artis Medicinae

[Is Unacceptable Acceptable? – Michael Haneke: Love ]

SOPSITS Árpád

JANUARY 20, 2019

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2019;29(01-02)

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Further articles in this publication

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Musings of the Guest Editor-in-Chief]

PUREBL György

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Our stubborn misbeliefs on ageing ]

RAJNA Péter

[Stressing the continuous increase of elderly population, the author demonstrates the negative impact of technical development on everyday routines of old population. It can explain that members of younger generations often create false ideations on mental and cognitive abilities of older ones, and consequently some stubborn misbeliefs are existing here. He deals with the following four of them in details: (1) Young age means worth, while old age is equal to deficit, (2) Every old person becomes demented, (3) Elderly people loose their interest and social sensitivity, (4) Old people means ballast for younger ones. The author emphasizes, that even the elderly persons are able to fall into these traps of misbeliefs. In addition to complex refutations, he states that the “spacecraft-model” described by L. Hayflick offers efficient solutions to preserve an adequate quality of life both for old people and their society. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Biological rhythms and ageing ]

PUREBL György

[Biological rhythms plays key role in maintaining health and preventing diseases. The changes of rhythms are normally associated to aging. Biological rhythms become more fragile along with the age and therefore they are connected to various age-related health problems. The interest about the strategies aiming to maintain or restore biological rhythms is increasing. There are evidences about the beneficial effect of rhythm restoration therapies in dementia and depression, but future studies are needed to clarify the general health promoting and also geroprotecting effect of these interventions. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Eight questions and answers about anxiety in the elderly in family practice ]

CSATLÓS Dalma, VAJDA Dóra, MOHOS András, GONDA Xénia

[Anxiety is one of the most common psychological disorders in the elderly. Physical illnesses contribute to its development, but the opposite is also true: anxiety adversely affects the prognosis of many somatic illnesses, thus significantly enhancing morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the recognition and adequate treatment of anxiety disorders in the elderly are especially important in family practice, too. With the increase of life expectancy, the problems and illnesses of the elderly receive more and more attention in medical practice and anxiety cannot be ignored either, because the early detection of its symptoms improves the quality of life and reduces the chance of bad prognosis. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Early detection of patients with dementia in Primary Care ]

OSTORHARICS-HORVÁTH György, TORZSA Péter

[Mental decline is becoming more and more frequent in the elderly these days. The symptoms of dementia may be best detected early in family practice. Physicians may detect the symptoms of mental decline of different levels. General practitioners play an important role in the early detection of patients with dementia. General practitioners keep contact and communicate with the caretaker of the patient regularly. If necessary General Practitioners visit the dementia patients in their own home environment, they can assess their patients’ circumstances and needs and if needed, they can prescribe home care. ]

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of the Brief Scales for Coping Profile in Textile Workers

ORNEK Koseoglu Ozlem, TEMEL Yavuz Guler

The aim of this study is to adapt the BSCP (Brief Scales for Coping Profile) scale to Turkish and to investigate its psychometric properties among textile workers. Methods: This a psychometric study with cross-sectional design. After translation procedures, the BSCP was administered to workers. Content validity of the BSCP was investigated with the CVI index and reliability was investigated with Cronbach’s Alpha. The construct validity was investigated with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Results: The psychometric properties of the original BSCP were supported by the Turkish version of the BSCP. According to the exploratory factor analysis, the BSCP had six subscales. The reliability of the BSCP subscales’ values were 0.692, 0.712, 0.661, 0.756, 0.786, and 0.777 respectively. Conclusion: The Turkish version of the BSCP showed acceptable reliability and validity which is the first adapted scale in Turkey for evaluating workers’ coping profiles. The scale will be a good option to provide basic data about workers’ coping profiles which may be used for prolonging stress management skills and health promotion programs by occupational health and psychiatric nurses, physicians, psychologist and safety experts.

Clinical Oncology

[Geriatric oncology]

TELEKES András

[Geriatric oncology has an increasing role since in several types of cancer the median age at diagnosis is above 60 years of age. The treatment of elderly patients are frequently set back by prejudice, stereotypes and lack of information. All these lead to the fact that even in well-developed countries elderly cancer patients often do not receive the necessary treatments. This is even more true in poor-countries, where the fi nancial defi cit accumulated in health care is often attempted to be reduced by the treatment of elderly. If a paediatric oncology patient does not get suffi cient cancer treatment there is a fi erce protest, but everybody is silent if this occurs in the case of an 80 years old patient. For this unacceptable situation both authorities (fi nancing) and professional bodies (treatment, education) are responsible. Clinical data show that elderly cancer patients get the same benefi t of active oncology treatment, as younger ones. Age on its own does not contraindicate any cancer treatment. The aim of this review is to prove by data, that elderly cancer patients should also get active oncology treatment. The questions of assessment include frailty, the relationship of cancer development and ageing, and other problems related to the oncology treatment of elderly patients are also discussed.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Hungarian experiences with the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale

CZEGLÉDI Edit, SZABÓ Kornélia

Background and purpose - Sociocultural influences regarding bodily appearance and their psychological consequences play a considerable role in the development and maintenance of body image disturbance and eating disorders. The purpose of the study was to explore the psychometric properties of the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised and its correlates among young adults in Hungary. Methods - In our cross-sectional online study, participants were 18-35 years old (N=820, 40% male). Measures: self-reported anthropometric data, Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised, Eating Disorder Inventory, SCOFF questionnaire, Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3, and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Results - The exploratory factor analysis showed that the fit indices of the three-factor solution are acceptable (c2(171)=5124.8, p<0.001, CFI=0.944, TLI=0.918, RMSEA=0.054, SRMR=0.030). Along the original ‘Importance of being thin’ and the ‘Importance of being fit’ factors, a third factor emerged, namely the ’Life fulfilment aspect of attractiveness’ factor. Internal consistency and construct validity of the scales were confirmed. Among those who were at risk of developing an eating disorder, all of the measured beliefs were significantly greater than among those who were not at risk (thin: Z=6.501, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.63, fit: t(818)=-4.749, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.41, and life fulfilment: t(239)=-5.702, p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.53). Conclusion - The Hungarian version of the Beliefs About Attractiveness Scale-Revised is a reliable, valid measure and we suggest its introduction into Hungarian research. Relationships between beliefs about attractiveness and self-esteem, body image and eating disorders suggest intervention opportunities in with regards to prevention and treatment of eating disorders.

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[How it all started: Untold Chapters of Nursing History in Hungary as testified by foxed Documents Part 1.]

SÖVÉNYI Ferencné, PERKÓ Magdolna, FEDINECZNÉ Vittay Katalin

[The article elaborates on the untold chapters of nursing history in Hungary, based on research in archives. The situation of nursing in Hungary in the first half of the 20th century is described, when nursing and nursing education became issues of outstanding importance and secular nursing appeared alongside faith based nursing. Several nursing organisations worked to address the unacceptable situation of nursing and strove to raise the status of nursing so as to allow this self-sacrificing vocation to take its rightful place in society. The tools to achieve this goal included providing professional education and training, creating professional literature and safeguarding nurses’ interests. The Hungarian National Association of Female and Male Nurses that came into being as a grass-root organisation in 1902, and its president, József Michalicza, an unreasonably forgotten figure in Hungarian secular nursing were instrumental in pursuing these goals. The article also mentions several dedicated figures in Hungarian nursing history, due to whose commitment Hungarian nurses were represented in the International Council of Nurses from 1933 until the interference of politics. ]