Lege Artis Medicinae

[Infectiosus diseases - Past, present, future]

SZALKA András1

JUNE 01, 2000

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2000;10(06)

[The complex interactions between microorganisms and humans include the well known, traditional infectious diseases and also the symbiotic relationship with the human endogenous normal flora. Forty years ago everybody was convinced that medicine would soon be able to eradicate most of the infectious diseases. Perception of victory over infectious diseases has been blunted in recent years by nosocomial infections and by the new and re-emerging diseases. The spectrum of infectious diseases is expanding and many of those once thought conquered are increasing in numbers. Moreover, the problems of infection are present in all aspects of medicine and with the field turning more and more complex its challenge for practitioners has become increasingly demanding. It is now clear, that at the dawn of the new millennium infectious disease remains the number one killer in the world. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Fővárosi Szent László Kórház VI. Belgyógyászati Osztály, Budapest

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[Practical aspects of screening for microalbuminuria in diabetic patients]

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[INTRODUCTION - The importance of measuring microalbuminuria is well established, however, controversy still exists regarding the type of urine specimen to be used for detecting early renal impairment of diabetic patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS – To evaluate practical aspects, albumin concentration and albumin to creatinine ratio of first void urine samples as well as urinary albumin excretion in timed specimens were determined by immunoturbidimetric method 3 times within 3 weeks in 192 adult diabetic patients (136 men, 56 women; type 1/type 2: 90/102; age: 51.4=10.8 years; duration of diabetes: 15.3+9.1 years; body mass index: 27.9+4.6 kg/m2; HbA1c: 8.5+1.5 %; actual blood pressure: 13814/82+8 mmHg; serum creatinine: 94+20 umol/l; x+SD). RESULTS - According to the urinary albumin excretion values, one third of patients (31.2%-30.7%-34.4%) were normoalbuminuric (<30 mg/24 hours), more than half of the patients (55.8%-57.3%-53.6%) proved to be microalbuminuric (30-300 mg/24 hours), while the remaining group of patients (13.0%-12.0%–12.0%) was macroalbuminuric (>300 mg/24 hours). Comparing the results of successive measurements good correlation was found between the same laboratory values (urinary albumin excretion: K=0.64; K=0.67; urinary albumin concentration: K=0.60; K=0.62; albumin to creatinine ratio: K=0.54; K=0.61; first vs. second and second vs. third measurements, respectively). The percentage of patients being in the same range of albuminuria (i.e. normo-, micro-or macroalbuminuria) at successive measurements was 79.7-81.2% with urinary albumin excretion values, 77.1-77.6% with urinary albumin concentration and 74.5-78.6% with albumin to creatinine ratio. Good correlations were found between urinary albumin excretion and urinary albumin concentration (K=0.54; 0.54; 0.57) and nearly the same correlations were observed between urinary albumin excretion and albumin to creatinine ratio (K=0.49; 0.47;0.54) at different series. Using values of urinary albumin excretion for comparison at all measurements, 79.3% sensitivity and 69.5% specifity were found for urinary albumin concentration whereas 74.6% sensitivity and 68.8% specifity were documented for albumin to creatinine ratio. CONCLUSION - Beside the standard measurement of urinary albumin excretion in timed urine samples, the use of the more convenient morning urinary spot collection could also provide useful results (urinary albumin concentration or albumin to creatinine ratio) for detecting early renal involvement in diabetic patients. ]

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[Complete and long lasting loss of coronary circulation results in myocardial cell death (ischemic necrosis). Short lasting ischemia (few minutes) is well tolerated and it may bring certain protection against recurrent ischemia (ischemic preconditioning). Contractile force promptly diminishes following the onset of ischemia and the changes in the intracellular ATP or Ca2+ concentration do not explain this phenomenon. With the progression of ischemia, myocardial relaxation ceases and hypertonic muscle activation appears (ischemic contracture). During myocardial reperfusion following short-term ischemia, arrhythmias often develop and pump function is regularly depressed transiently (myocardial stunning). Permanent reduction in coronary blood supply results in sustained ventricular dysfunction (hibernation). It has been established, that pathologic processes leading to ischemic injury are distinct from those of reperfusion injury. Cellular events are complicated (Ca2+-overload, free radical injuries, activation of proteolytic processes, energy loss, membrane damage, hypercontracture, etc.), and complete understanding of the background of ischemic/reperfusion disorders is still awaited. ]

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