Lege Artis Medicinae

[In the focus: oncology - Readers’ questions answered by dr. Olga Ésik]

ÉSIK Olga

JUNE 21, 2006

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2006;16(06)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[The 41st Congress of The European Society of Hepatic Research - 26-30 April, 2006. Wien]

LOMBAY Béla

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Therapy Culture]

BÁNFALVI Attila

Lege Artis Medicinae

[AUTOIMMUNE PANCREATITIS - AN UNDERDIAGNOSED DISEASE?]

CZAKÓ László

[Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently recognized type of chronic pancreatitis that is clearly distinct from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Its clinical symptoms include jaundice, abdominal pain, weight loss and diabetes mellitus. It may be associated with other autoimmune diseases. IgG levels are elevated and autoantibodies can be detected. Pancreatic imaging reveals a diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct. The characteristic histological features are lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis. Autoimmune pancreatitis responds dramatically to steroid therapy, in contrast to other types of chronic pancreatitis, which hardly respond to any of the various therapies. It is important to be aware of this disease because it may be mistaken for other forms of chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer, which leads to pancreatic resection when steroid treatment would be sufficient. This review discusses the clinical, laboratory, histological and imaging findings that are seen in autoimmune pancreatitis with particular focus on diagnosis. With the improvement of the diagnostic work-up less unnecessary pancreatic resections are expected to happen in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[WAYS OF PREVENTION OF SEPTIC COMPLICATIONS IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS]

OLÁH Attila

[Similarly to other acute inflammatory responses, the mortality curve of acute pancreatitis has two distinct peaks. The first one, which coincides with a hyperinflammatory phase, is due to the development of an overwhelming systemic inflammatory response syndrome and subsequent multi-organ failure. The second peak of mortality is detected much later, after 14 days from the onset of the disease, when the compensatory antiinflammatory phase results in the infection of the necrotising pancreatic glandular substance. Since no therapy has been shown to efficiently prevent the activation of inflammatory and proteolytic cascades that evoke and sustain the disease, the treatment of acute pancreatitis is basically symptomatic. Beside adequate fluid and volume replacement and pain relief, medical and mechanical support may become necessary if organ failure develops. Recent studies suggest that there are ways to decrease the incidence of infection in pancreatic necrosis, which is usually due to bacterial translocation from the gut. The results of attempts to decrease the frequency of septic complications are controversial. A number of studies support the need of antibiotic prophylaxis but the evidence is weak. Furthermore, the increasingly observed infections by multi-resistant strains of Gram-positive bacteria and Candida species are due to long-term antibiotic use, which strongly questions the grounds for prophylactic antibiotic treatment. Recently, various clinical studies aimed to decrease bacterial translocation in other ways, including probiotic use and enteral feeding. This paper provides a systematic review of the data available in the evidence-based literature on the use of antibiotics and the role of alternative and adjuvant therapy in the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Personality Protection in Medical Research]

ALEXIN Zoltán

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Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

The methylation status of NKCC1 and KCC2 in the patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy

UNAL Yasemin, KARA Murat, GENC Fatma, OZTURK Aslan Dilek, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin, KAYNAR Taner, TOSUN Kursad, KUTLU Gülnihal

Purpose - Methylation is a key epigenetic modification of DNA and regarding its impact on epilepsy, it is argued that “DNA methylation may play an important role in seizure susceptibility and maintenance of the disorder”. DNA methylation status of KCC2 (SCL12A5) and NKCC1 (SCL12A2) associated with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy was investigated in our study. Materials and methods - Thirty-eight patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who were diagnosed by video EEG monitoring and 32 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Twenty-three patients in TLE group were men and the remaining 15 were women. Among them, 27 had unilateral temporal focus (9 with right; 18 with left) and 11 patients had bilateral TLE. We analyzed promoter region methylation status of the KCC2 (SCL12A5) and NKCC1 (SCL12A2) genes in the case and control groups. Gene regions of interest were amplified through PCR and sequencing was accomplished with pyro-sequencing. Results - We found a significant relationship between TLE and methylation on the NKCC1. However, there was no association between TLE and methylation on the KCC2 gene. Also, we found no association between right or left and unilateral or bilateral foci of TLE. There was no relationship between TLE and methylation on the NKCC1and KCC2 genes in terms of mesial temporal sclerosis in cranial MRI, head trauma or febrile convulsions. Conclusion - The methylation of NKCC1 can be a mecha­nism of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. There are limited findings about DNA methylation in TLE. Therefore, further studies with large sample sizes are necessary.

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[Family planning in multiple sclerosis: conception, pregnancy, breastfeeding]

RÓZSA Csilla

[Family planning is an exceptionally important question in multiple sclerosis, as women of childbearing age are the ones most often affected. Although it is proven that pregnancy does not worsen the long-term prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, many patients are still doubtful about having children. This question is further complicated by the fact that patients – and often even doctors – are not sufficiently informed about how the ever-increasing number of available disease-modifying treatments affect pregnancies. Breastfeeding is an even less clear topic. Patients usually look to their neurologists first for answers concerning these matters. It falls to the neurologist to rationally evaluate the risks and benefits of contraception, pregnancy, assisted reproduction, childbirth, breastfeeding and disease modifying treatments, to inform patients about these, and then together come to a decision about the best possible therapeutic approach, taking the patients’ individual family plans into consideration. Here we present a review of relevant literature adhering to international guidelines on the topics of conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding, with a special focus on the applicability of approved disease modifying treatments during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians involved in the care of MS patients with up-to-date information that they can utilize in their day-to-day clinical practice. ]

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[Medical use of marihuana especially in oncology]

VÉGH Éva

[The medical use of marijuana has gained a considerable attention among wide range of cancer patients lately in Hungary. Consequently, oncologist sare facing questions related to cannabinoids more and more in their clinical practice. This article aims to clarify some basic concepts and to give a brief introduction on the current international and national legislation on their accessibility. Numerous publications have dealt with the application of marijuana in various indications. Among the tumour related indications, the concerned studies mainly refer to chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, chronic pain, sleep disorders, anorexia and cachexia. The article also to uches upon on knowledge connected to the causal treatment of malignant tumours, which are currently limited to glioblastoma. Information on the carcinogenic potential of cannabis and information on the popularity and attitudes of American oncologists can be found in this article. This paper gives a literature review in the above mentioned themes.]