Lege Artis Medicinae

[How Psychiatrists Relate to Pharmaceutical Industry Companies – Part of the Problem or the Solution?]

THOMAS R. Insel

SEPTEMBER 20, 2010

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2010;20(09)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Laymen’s Gymnastics Movement – Establishment of the National Gymnastics Club]

KÖLNEI Lívia

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[Gustav Klimt and the Early Viennese Secession, 1895-1905]

NEMESI Zsuzsanna

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Identity of Psychiatrists – a Criticism of Psychiatry by Thomas Szasz]

KELEMEN Gábor

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[Reform of the Hungarian health care - Where are we now?]

LANTOS Zoltán

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Incretin based therapies from a clinician’s view]

KIS János Tibor

[The incretin based therapies give new and promising opportunities in the care of type 2 diabetic patients. Right now two kinds of incretinmimetics and three incretinenhancers are available in Hungary. There are more and more agents and more industrial products. There are several publications about the advantages of these products, but only a few data can be found about the comparison of them. The author tries to evaluate the incretin based therapies, and tries to help the clinicians choose the right one.]

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We aimed to investigate the association between fluoxetine use and the survival of hospitalised coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia patients. This retrospective case-control study used data extracted from the medical records of adult patients hospitalised with moderate or severe COVID-19 pneumonia at the Uzsoki Teaching Hospital of the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary between 17 March and 22 April 2021. As a part of standard medical treatment, patients received anti-COVID-19 therapies as favipiravir, remdesivir, baricitinib or a combination of these drugs; and 110 of them received 20 mg fluoxetine capsules once daily as an adjuvant medication. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between fluoxetine use and mortality. For excluding a fluoxetine-selection bias potentially influencing our results, we compared baseline prognostic markers in the two groups treated versus not treated with fluoxetine. Out of the 269 participants, 205 (76.2%) survived and 64 (23.8%) died between days 2 and 28 after hospitalisation. Greater age (OR [95% CI] 1.08 [1.05–1.11], p<0.001), radiographic severity based on chest X-ray (OR [95% CI] 2.03 [1.27–3.25], p=0.003) and higher score of shortened National Early Warning Score (sNEWS) (OR [95% CI] 1.20 [1.01-1.43], p=0.04) were associated with higher mortality. Fluoxetine use was associated with an important (70%) decrease of mortality (OR [95% CI] 0.33 [0.16–0.68], p=0.002) compared to the non-fluoxetine group. Age, gender, LDH, CRP, and D-dimer levels, sNEWS, Chest X-ray score did not show statistical difference between the fluoxetine and non-fluoxetine groups supporting the reliability of our finding. Provisional to confirmation in randomised controlled studies, fluoxetine may be a potent treatment increasing the survival for COVID-19 pneumonia.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Second game, 37th move and Fourth game 78th move]

VOKÓ Zoltán

[What has Go to do with making clinical decisions? One of the greatest intellectual challenges of bedside medicine is making decisions under uncertainty. Besides the psychological traps of traditionally intuitive and heuristic medical decision making, lack of information, scarce resources and characteristics of doctor-patient relationship contribute equally to this uncertainty. Formal, mathematical model based analysis of decisions used widely in developing clinical guidelines and in health technology assessment provides a good tool in theoretical terms to avoid pitfalls of intuitive decision making. Nevertheless it can be hardly used in individual situations and most physicians dislike it as well. This method, however, has its own limitations, especially while tailoring individual decisions, under inclusion of potential lack of input data used for calculations, or its large imprecision, and the low capability of the current mathematical models to represent the full complexity and variability of processes in complex systems. Nevertheless, clinical decision support systems can be helpful in the individual decision making of physicians if they are well integrated in the health information systems, and do not break down the physicians’ autonomy of making decisions. Classical decision support systems are knowledge based and rely on system of rules and problem specific algorithms. They are utilized widely from health administration to image processing. The current information revolution created the so-called artificial intelligence by machine learning methods, i.e. machines can learn indeed. This new generation of artificial intelligence is not based on particular system of rules but on neuronal networks teaching themselves by huge databases and general learning algorithms. This type of artificial intelligence outperforms humans already in certain fields like chess, Go, or aerial combat. Its development is full of challenges and threats, while it presents a technological breakthrough, which cannot be stopped and will transform our world. Its development and application has already started also in the healthcare. Health professionals must participate in this development to steer it into the right direction. Lee Sedol, 18-times Go world champion retired three years after his historical defeat from AlphaGo artificial intelligence, be­cause “Even if I become the No. 1, there is an entity that cannot be defeated”. It is our great luck that we do not need to compete or defeat it, we must ensure instead that it would be safe and trustworthy, and in collaboration with humans this entity would make healthcare more effective and efficient. ]

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Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

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Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

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Chronic form of Pisa syndrome after prolonged exposure to low-dose amisulpride treatment

ERDEM Şimşek Nazan, ÖZKAYNAK Sibel Sehur

Pisa syndrome is a movement problem defined by tonic, sustained lateral flexion with a slight posterior rotation of the trunk. It seems to be a side effect of antipsychotic medicine in most cases. The clinical duration of Pisa syndrome can be acute, chronic, or recurrent. As far as we know, no reports are available in the literature on the chronic form of Pisa syndrome caused by low-dose amisulpride. A case of refractory tardive dystonia form of Pisa syndrome during treatment with stable low-dose amisulpride is presented in this report. Long-term, low-dosage amisulpride therapy may induce tardive dystonia even in patients with no other risk factors for dystonia.

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[The role of anaerobic bacteria in brain abscesses: a literature review]

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[Brain abscesses are potentially serious, life-threatening diseases that pose a complex diagnostic challenge not only to neurosurgeons but also to clinical microbiologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, infectologists. The etiology of brain abscess is usually polymicrobial, most commonly involving a variety of aerobic and obligate anaerobic bacteria. Epidemiological studies on the anaerobic etiology of brain abscesses are common between the time period of 1960s and 1980s, but today there are very few new publications on the subject. The role of anaerobic bacteria in this disease was presumably underdiagnosed for a very long time, as many laboratories did not have the adequate laboratory capabilities for their cultivation and identification. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available literature on the etiology of obligate anaerobic bacteria in brain abscesses, including their prevalence and current therapeutic recommendations.]