Lege Artis Medicinae

[HIJ - CREATE]

MATOS Lajos

JANUARY 20, 2010

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2010;20(01)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[The bell is cracked]

BONDÁR Éva

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The effect of chronic stress on defense mechanisms chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis]

MOLNÁR Ildikó

[During stress, the activation of the hypothalamus- pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic, sensory nervous system leads to an increased production of glucocorticoids, catecholamines and other active peptides. The specific receptors on immunocompetent and tissue cells for glucocorticoid, corticotropin-releasing hormone and histamine, substance-P, norepinephrine, calcitonin gene-related peptide can modify the cytokine production of macrophages, lymphocytes and tissue cells. Local hormonal effects have a role in the degranulation of mast cells and thus in histamine release and neurogenic inflammation. Long-term, chronic inflammations promote carcinogenesis, in which the tumourassociated macrophages have an important role. Carcinogenesis is associated with disturbed cooperation between the neuronal immune and endocrine systems.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Recognize Ourselves in our Dependencies! – A Discussion with Toxicologist Gábor Zacher]

NEMESI Zsuzsanna

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[The effect of bisphosphonates on bone fracture risk]

TAKÁCS István

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Vitality generators]

BAGDY Emőke

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[How does the brain create rhythms?]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Connection was found between rhythmic cortical activity and motor control. The 10 Hz μ-rhythm and the 20-30 Hz bursts represent two functional states of the somatomotor system. A correspondence of the central μ-rhythm of the motor cortex and the physiological hand tremor (8-12 Hz) is presumed. The precise tuning of the motor system can be estimated by the frequency of repetitive finger movements. In complex tapping exercise, the index finger is the most skillful, the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers keep rhythm with less precision. It was found that the organization of mirror movements depends on the cortical representation of fingers. Mirror finger movements are more regular if the subject begins the motor action with the 5th (small) finger. Concerning cortical regulation of finger movements, it was suggested that there are two time-keeping systems in the brain; one with a sensitivity above and another with a sensitivity below the critical frequency of 3 Hz. The preferred meter which helps to maintain synchronous finger movements is the cadence of 4/4 and 8/8. We observed that the unlearned inward-outward sequential finger movement was equally impaired in nonmusician controls and patients with Parkinson-disease. In movement disorders, the ability of movement and the “clock-mechanism” are equally involved. The polyrhythmic finger movement is not our inborn ability, it has to be learned. The “timer” function, which regulates the rhythmic movement, is presumably localised in the basal ganglia or in the cerebellum. The meter of the music is built on the reciprocal values of 2 raised to the second to fifth power (1/12, 1/22, 1/23, 1/24, 1/25). The EEG frequencies that we consider important in the regulation of cons-cious motor actions are approximately in the same domain (4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Hz). During music performance, an important neural process is the coupling of distant brain areas. Concerning melody, the musical taste of Europeans is octavebased. Musical ornaments also follow the rule of the gothic construction, that is: pursuit of harmony towards the single one rising from the unification of 8-4-2 classes. Leibnitz concerned music as the unconscious mathematics of the soul. Movement-initiating effect of music is used in rehabilitation of patients with movement disorders. The meter and rhythm have superiority over the melody. It is possible that rhythmic movements can be generated also in the absence of sensory input and the central oscillators can produce “fictive motor patterns”.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[BASICS OF MRI MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING]

MARTOS János

[Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a young, developing technology used to create images with extraordinary detail of body tissue or the brain by applying nuclear magnetic resonance phenomena. The MRI technique uses a pulse of radio-frequency energy to excite the hydrogen nuclei, the protons. The distribution of hydrogen nuclei of water and fat in the body depends on the tissue type and whether or not the tissue is healthy or diseased. The image brightness is a complex function of properties in the region of interest, which include parameters of protons density and the relaxation times of the protons. Manipulating these properties is accomplished by varying the experiment (pulse sequence) used at the time of examination to yield images that contains different contrast. Although MRI is normally a noninvasive technique, contrast agents can be administered to a subject to enhance a region of interest. There are now more than 22,000 MR systems in use worldwide. MR is one of the best diagnostic exams for imaging many types of soft-tissue including: the brain, the spine, the heart, aorta and coronary arteries, the organs of the upper abdomen and the pelvis as well as the joints.]

Clinical Oncology

[Angiogenesis – antiangiogenesis]

PAKU Sándor, SEBESTYÉN Anna, KOPPER László

[Tumor growth requires vascularization to be supplied by oxygen and nutritients. The vascular network could be different between tumors, even during the development of the same tumor (local and systemic spreading), from the occupation of already present vessels to the real angiogenesis (i.e, proliferation of endothelial cells). Moreover, the tumor cells can create channels, mimicking the normal vessels. This spectrum in morphology should be refl ected in the therapeutic response, in the effectiveness of antiangiogens, but the how is unknown. It is sure that acceptable clinical activity can be achieved only with combinations, both with traditional cytotoxic and targeting drugs. The clinical advantage can be hampered by increased toxicity, demanding supportive actions. One of the key decisions is to select the proper therapy considering the patient and the tumor characteristics (today increasingly at molecular level) and predict the response to the therapy. Such (bio)markers are still missing, although intensive research trying the best. Since the main target of antiangiogenic drugs (today and tomorrow) the VEGF/R family, a useful marker is expected from them. The inhibition of angiogenesis is a logical step against the solid tumors and these steps slowly but steadily can improve the patients life-time, as well as their quality of life.]

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[Committed physicians, emotional resonance for a better physician-patient relationship]

LAZÁNYI Kornélia, SZLUHA Kornélia

[With the advent of holistic medicine in the second half of the 20th century, the range of behavioural patterns that are expected from healthcare workers has also changed. Nowadays, numerous references in literature put emphasis on the potential positive impact of personal interactions between physician and patient on the healing process and overall well-being of patients. However, it does not come naturally to all workers with caring professions to seek personal interactions with their patients or display appropriate emotions. Some will have to make deliberate efforts, perform emotional labour, to achieve that goal. A healthcare worker’s commitment to healing and caring may make it easier for him/her to perform emotional labour. Emotional labour and commitment of 84 healthcare workers involved in oncology, and organizational factors with impact thereupon, were studied to explore the potential relationship between commitment and emotional labour. PANAS-X questionnaires were used to quantify emotional labour, while commitment and influencing factors were surveyed by means of explicative questions. Our findings confirmed a correlation between commitment and genuine acting as corroborated by literaure data. It was demonstrated that committed healthcare workers’ spontaneous emotions were more in compliance with what their patients expected them to display, and even their behavioural patterns were more in tune with the patients’ expectations. Confirmation as an organizational factor and colleague/ patient attitudes were found to have the strongest impact on commitment. It is essential that selection criteria for healthcare workers include examination for an altruistic caring attitude. Even more importantly, operators and managers of healthcare institutes should make efforts to create a good working environment and offer regular confirmative feedbacks for improved commitment by their employees.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Evaluation of cystic renal masses with MDCT]

BATA Pál, MIKUSI Regina, KARLINGER Kinga, BÉRCZI Viktor, SZENDRŐI Attila, ROMICS Imre

[Modern CT and MRI scanners can give an exact and rapid diagnosis in the case of most cystic renal masses. Dilemma in their diagnosis is whether or not the changes need surgical intervention. The question of follow-up is decided with the use of the Bosniak classification. To characterize the cystic changes excellent quality, multiphasic MDCT examination is necessary with the following parameters: 80-120 mls. of non-ionic iodinated intravenous contrast material given with an injector at 3 ml/sec flow-rate with saline flush technique, unenhanced and post-contrast scans obtained at 35 and 70 seconds, with more scans at 120-300 seconds, as deemed necessary. A collimation of 16x1.5 mm with an overlap of 50% should be aimed for. Through the primary data we perform a reconstruction of 2 mm, with an option to create volume-rendered image sin the post-processing phase, as necessary. With the help of this CT protocol we can measure the different criterions of Bosniak classification in the cystic masses like minimal, smooth or irregular wall thickening, with or without enhancement. We can recognize hairline thin or thickened septa, fine or irregular (thick or nodular) calcifications, solid component with or without contrast enhancement. Using these criteria each cystic mass can be assigned to a Bosniak cystic category (I, II, IIF, III and IV)]