Lege Artis Medicinae

[High dose short term thrombolytic therapy in pulmonary embolism]

KÁLI András1, VÉRTES András1, KOLONICS István1, SEIDNER Judit1, SZENTE András1

MARCH 30, 1994

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1994;4(03)

[A new thrombolytic method for rapid and safe therapy of pulmonary embolism is presented. Three cases of successful thrombolytic treatment of pulmonary embolism are discussed. In each case high dose, short term streptokinase therapy was used (3 million U/2"), followed by rapid anatomical, haemodynamical and clinical improvement without bleeding side effects. The authors recommend this type of therapy for pulmonary embolism. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Országos Kardiológiai Intézet Budapest

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