Lege Artis Medicinae

[Healthcare in developed countries - what will be the main changes in the 1990s?]

NICK Bosanquet1

JANUARY 31, 1994

Lege Artis Medicinae - 1994;4(01)

[The aim of my thesis is to assess what changes are to be expected in the health sector in the 1990s. In my summary I have outlined some possible lessons for Eastern Europe. Will Eastern Europe learn from the mistakes of other countries and be able to go beyond Western European practice by adopting wiser health policies? Where would this kind of wisdom lead?]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Professor of Health Policy St. Mary's Hospital Medical School, Imperial College, University of London

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