Lege Artis Medicinae

[EVIDENCE BASED ORAL ANTIDIABETIC THERAPY]

JERMENDY György

JANUARY 20, 2005

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2005;15(01)

[Oral antidiabetic drugs are used in type 2 diabetic patients when diet and physical exercise have failed. The oral antidiabetic drugs available in Hungary can be classified according to their main effect. In this regard, antihyperglycaemic drugs with no hypoglycaemic potential (alfaglucosidase inhibitors, biguanides, thiazolidinedions) and drugs with a potential of insulin secretion (sulfonylureas, prandial glucose regulators) can be distinguished. Acarbose is mainly used in order to decrease the postprandial glucose excursion. Metformin is the drug of choice for obese, insulin resistant diabetic subjects while buformin is not preferable anymore since the availability of metformin. Rosiglitazone, the only thiazolidine-dion derivative in Hungary, can be used in combination therapy in diabetic subjects with clinical characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. The list of sulfonylureas contains five drugs in Hungary which enables differential therapeutical strategies to be performed. The prandial glucose regulators can be used either in monotherapy or in combination with other drugs at the relatively early stage of the disease. At present, the recommendations for treating diabetic patients with oral antidiabetic drugs can be based on clinical evidences.]

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[After cholecystectomy, recurrent biliary-like pain, alone or in association with a transient increase in liver enzymes may be the clinical manifestation of the sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). Most of the clinical information concerning SOD refers to postcholecystectomy patients who have been classified according to clinical presentation, laboratory results and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) findings as: biliary type I, biliary type II, and biliary type III. The prevalence of SOD has been reported to vary from 9 to 11% in unselected patients having postcholecystectomy syndrome up to 68% in a selected group of patients without organic disorder and complaining of postcholecystectomy pain. Diagnostic work-up of postcholecystectomy patients for suspected SOD includes liver biochemistry and pancreatic enzyme levels plus negative findings of structural abnormalities. Usually this would include transabdominal ultrasound, gastroscopy and ERCP. Depending on the available resources, endoscopic ultrasound and magnetic resonance cholangiography may precede endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in specific clinical conditions. In SOD patients, the endoscopic sphincter of Oddi manometry is the gold-standard diagnostic method to evaluate the abnormal motor function of the sphincter of Oddi. Quantitative evaluation of bile transit with cholescintigraphy is valuable in the decision whether to perform sphincter of Oddi manometry or to treat. The standard treatment for SOD is sphincterotomy. In biliary type I patients, the indication for endoscopic sphincterotomy is straightforward without the need of additional investigations. Slow bile transit on cholescintigraphy in biliary type II patients is an indication to perform endoscopic sphincterotomy without sphincter of Oddi manometry. Positive Nardi or Debray evocative test in biliary type III patients is an indication to perform sphincter of Oddi manometry. Medical therapy with nitrosovasodilatators, Ca-channel blockers, theophyllin compounds, β2 receptor agonists and anticholinerg drugs can be useful in biliary type II and type III patients preceding endoscopic sphincterotomy. If medical therapy fails, one might proceed to perform ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy but only in patients with abnormal SO manometry results.]

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Image challenge

What do you see on the feet of the diabetic patient?