Lege Artis Medicinae

[Efficacy and safety of sitagliptin during long term treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes]

HIDVÉGI Tibor

SEPTEMBER 20, 2010

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2010;20(09)

[Due to the progressive nature of the type 2 diabetes mellitus and treatment requires prolonged lifestyle and/or pharmacologic management, the long term efficacy, durability and safety of newer antihyperglycemic agents are important considerations. Metformin is the most common prescribed oral antihyperglycemic agent (OHA) for initial therapy. Often, initial single oral agent is not sufficient to maintain good glucose control, combination of OHA are usually required to manage patients with type 2 diabetes. Incretinbased therapies (e.g. dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) inhibitors and analogues of glucagon like peptide 1) are newer compounds available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Sitagliptin is a once-daily OHA with a novel mechanism of action that targets the incretin axis. Addition of sitagliptin to ongoing metformin therapy was well tolerated and resulted in significant glycemic improvement after 30-104 weeks of treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes.]

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